SRJC Course Outlines

9/27/2020 10:23:43 PMNRM 51 Course Outline as of Fall 2017

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  NRM 51Title:  WILDLAND TREE/SHRUB  
Full Title:  Wildland Trees and Shrubs
Last Reviewed:9/12/2016

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.5017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled43.75
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled2.006 min.Lab Scheduled35.00
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total4.50 Contact Total78.75
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  87.50Total Student Learning Hours: 166.25 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  FOR 51

Catalog Description:
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A study of the taxonomy, physiology, community and ecological relationships of trees and shrubs of the United States, with particular emphasis on California species. Analysis of the botanical and anatomical characteristics of these plants. Includes mandatory field trips.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A study of the taxonomy, physiology, community and ecological relationships of trees and shrubs of the United States, with particular emphasis on California species. Analysis of the botanical and anatomical characteristics of these plants. Includes mandatory field trips.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:C
Natural Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 B2Life ScienceFall 1981
 B3Laboratory Activity  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1. Students will be able to:
Identify, classify, compare, and collect various plant genera and species generally found in California and describe the basic ecological requirements.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Identify a wide variety of trees and shrubs based on various morphological features based on
     the binomial method of plant nomenclature.
2. Use a dichotomous plant key and typical field guides effectively to identify specimens.
3. Classify and identify trees and shrubs based on the binomial method of plant nomenclature.
4. Compare and contrast the various plant genera and species within the North Coast Range and
     Sierra Nevada.
5. Evaluate the intrinsic and economic value of trees and shrubs, and the economic impact of the
     non-native/invasive species, and their role in forest sustainability.
6. Distinguish among common forest community types of the Western United States, with
     particular emphasis on California.
7. Determine basic ecological requirements of common forest trees and shrubs.
8. Collect, mount, and identify plants in order to compile a plant collection.

Topics and Scope
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I. Physiology and Morphology of Trees and Shrubs
     A. Plant morphology
     B. Physiology of various plant parts and their function
     C. Morphology and physiology of flowering parts
II. Plant Communities and Succession
     A. Autoecology of plants and its effect upon plant distribution
     B. Synecology and key plant indicators
     C. The effect of the environment on the distribution of plant communities
III. Tree Growth and Function
     A. Photosynthesis and the effect of light upon growth and regeneration
     B. Tree measurements - (Height, diameter, increment growth, etc.)
     C. Dendrochronology
     D. Leaf morphology and characteristics
     E. Physiological Growth Habits of Trees
     F. Climatic effect upon trees and growth habits
     G. Taxonomy
          1. Trees
          2. Branches without leaves
IV. Taxonomy and Physiological Growth Habits of Shrubs
     A. Environmental characteristics of shrub communities
     B. Soil types and moisture effects upon shrubs
     C. Succession in shrub communities following disturbance (ie: fire)
     D. Taxonomy of shrubs
V. Soils
     A. Basic soil composition and type and effects of plant/tree distribution and growth
     B. Moisture and its effects upon distribution of plants
VI. Composition and Distribution of California Ecosystems
     A. Wetlands
     B. Riparian Woodlands
     C. North Coast forest
     D. Klamath Region
     E. Pinyon-Juniper
     F. Sub-alpine forests
     G. Oaks
     H. Chaparral
     I. Redwood forest
     J. Douglas Fir forest
     K. Closed cone forest
     L. Valley Riparian
     M. Foothill woodland
     N. Mixed conifer
     O. Giant Sequoia groves
VII. Species Identification
     A. Plant keys
          1. Introduction to plant taxonomic system and botanical nomenclature
          2. Classification
     B. Compiling a collection
VIII. Plant Collections
     A. Methods of gathering and preserving plant materials
     B. Mounting techniques
     C. Proper labeling of mounted specimens

Assignments:
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Representative assignments:
1. Assigned textbook readings, 15 -20 pages per week
2. Field work: including tree and shrub species identification
3. Compile a plant collection consisting of at least 50 properly identified and labeled specimens
4. Field notes from field trips (4)
5. Six quizzes; three lab plant identification tests; and final exam

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 20%
Field notes
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 15%
Field work; identification
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
10 - 15%
Compile and label plant collection
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
60 - 70%
Quizzes and Exams: True/false, matching items, completion, lab identification
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Attendance and participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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How to Identify Plants. Harrington, H.D. Ohio University Press: 1997 (classic)
Introduction to California Plant Life. Ornduff, Robert and Faber, Phyliis and Wolf, Todd. University of California Press: 2003 (classic)
North American Trees (5th). Preston Jr., Richard and Braham, Richard. Iowa State Press: 2003 (classic)
Familiar Trees of North American, Western Region (Audubon Society Pocket Guides). Franklin, Jerry N. Knopf: 1987 (classic)
Trees and Shrubs of California. Stuart, John and Sawyer, John. University of California Press: 2001 (classic)

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