SRJC Course Outlines

10/22/2020 5:33:00 PMSUSAG 160 Course Outline as of Fall 2004

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  SUSAG 160Title:  DIRECT FARM MARKETING  
Full Title:  Direct Farm Marketing
Last Reviewed:1/28/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum2.00Lecture Scheduled.5017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled8.75
Minimum2.00Lab Scheduled4.5010 min.Lab Scheduled78.75
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  17.50Total Student Learning Hours: 105.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  AG 270.15

Catalog Description:
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Overview of direct farm marketing. Includes innovative marketing alternatives for the small to medium size grower, proven methods of product development, promotion, pricing and distribution.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Overview of direct farm marketing. Includes innovative marketing alternatives for the small to medium size grower, proven methods of product development, promotion, pricing and distribution.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Not Certificate/Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Compare and contrast direct and conventional marketing practices.
2.  Identify food safety issues related to direct farm marketing of
fresh produce.
3.  Evaluate a variety of direct farm marketing techniques for
effectiveness.
4.  Set up and profitably manage a produce stand.
5.  Evaluate crop suitability for restaurant use.
6.  Differentiate between post-harvest handling techniques for crops
sold to restaurants and at produce stands.
7.  Employ proper harvesting techniques.
8.  Properly handle produce after harvest, based on its intended market.
9.  Establish and maintain productive relationships with customers.
10.  Set up and fulfill subscription produce contracts.
11. Develop pricing structures for various end users.
12. Determine strategies for total utilization.

Topics and Scope
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I. Overview of direct farm marketing
 A. Direct marketing
 B. Conventional marketing
II. Direct marketing techniques
 A. Farmers markets
 B. Roadside stands and U-pick operations
 C. Farm Trails
 D. Selling to restaurants
 E. Mail order and catalog sales
 F. Community supported agriculture
III. Harvest
IV. Post-Harvest handling
 A. Safety
 B. Handling for restaurants
 C. Handling for produce stand
V. Regulations
VI. Marketing Strategies
 A. Pricing
 B. Signage
VII. Total product utilization
 A. Options
 B. Safe and effective donations
   1. where to donate
   2. generating PR
VIII. Relationships with Customers

Assignments:
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Representative assignments:
1. Evaluate crop availability and send a weekly list to staff at the
Culinary Cafe.
2. Receive produce orders, harvest, and pack for delivery.
3. Visit  2 - 4 members of Sonoma County Farm Trails and at least two
farmers markets to observe direct marketing techniques.
4. Write field notes on visits.
5. Assist with Shone Farm harvest and participate in all aspects of
preparation for and execution of SRJC campus produce stand.
6. Reading: 10 - 15 pages per week.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments and skill demonstrations are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
40 - 60%
Field work, Field notes.
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
30 - 40%
Harvest & produce stand.
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Participation.


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Instructor prepared materials.

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