SRJC Course Outlines

8/15/2022 12:38:32 AMPOLS 2 Course Outline as of Spring 2004

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  POLS 2Title:  INTRO/COMPAR GOVT  
Full Title:  Introduction to Comparative Government
Last Reviewed:5/14/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled012 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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A contemporary in-depth study of four nations, examining their historical, economic, social, cultural, and political dynamics and challenges.  The course will compare, contrast and evaluate the following countries: Germany, Japan, China, and Mexico.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A contemporary in-depth study of four nations examining their historical, economic, social, cultural, and political dynamics and challenges.  The course will compare, contrast and evaluate these following countries: Germany, Japan, China, and Mexico.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2012
 D8Political Science, Govt, Legal Instutns  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1991Summer 2012
 D2Economics  
 D4Gender Studies  
 D8Political Science, Govt, Legal Instutns  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981Summer 1991
 D2Economics  
 D4Gender Studies  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981
 4HPolitical Science:Govt and Legal Instutn  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: POLS 130 Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics SRJC Equivalent Course(s): POLS2

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Define, state, and explain the comparative model we will use in
  the course for the purpose of comparing nations to each other.
2. Argue a particular point in connection to the comparative model.
3. Demonstrate communication and analytical skills.
4. Use information learned from the textbook and lectures on exams.
5. Compare and contrast the political cultures, methods of political
socialization, and government institutions of Germany, Japan, China, and
Mexico.
6. Evaluate how the governments and the people interact in each of these
  four countries
7.  Differentiate and critique the various components of the governments
   in each of these four countries.
8. Appraise how the nations we study in comparative government compare
   to the United States.

Topics and Scope
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1.  Introduction to the course.
     A. Scope and purpose of the course.
     B. Review syllabus.
     C. Review textbooks.
2.  The theoretical framework for the course.
     A. How to study comparative government.
     B. The theoretical framework of the course.
     C. An explanation of the methodology.
Part One: Germany.
3.  An Introduction.
     A. The geography.
     B. The people.
     C. The history.
4.  Political Culture and Political Socialization.
     A. A description of Germany's political culture.
     B. A discussion of Germany's political socialization process.
5.  Political Interaction and Articulation Between People and Government.
     A. Voter participation.
     B. Campaigns and elections.
     C. Political parties and interest groups.
6.  Governmental Institutions.
     A. The structure of government.
     B. The function of government.
7.  An evaluation of Germany.
     A. Public policy.
     B. Performance.
     C. The future.
Part Two:  Japan
8.  An Introduction.
     A. The geography
     B. The people.
     C. The history.
9.  Political Culture and Political Socialization.
     A. A description of Japan's political culture.
     B. A discussion of Japan's political socialization process.
10. Political Interaction and Articulation Between People and Government.
     A. Voter participation.
     B. Campaigns and elections.
     C. Political parties and interest groups.
11. Governmental Institutions.
     A. The structure of government.
     B. The function of government.
12. An Evaluation of Japan.
     A. Public policy.
     B. Performance.
     C. The future.
Part Three:  China.
13. An Introduction.
     A. The geography.
     B. The people.
     C. The history.
14. Political Culture and Political Socialization.
     A. A description of China's political culture.
     B. A discussion of China's political socialization process.
15. Political Interaction and Articulation Between People and Government.
     A. Voter participation.
     B. Campaigns and elections.
     C. Political parties and interest groups.
16. Governmental Institutions.
     A. The structure of government.
     B. The function of government.
17. An Evaluation of China.
     A. Public policy.
     B. Performance.
     C. The future.
Part Four:  Mexico.
18. An Introduction.
     A. The geography.
     B. The people.
     C. The history.
19. Political Culture and Political Socialization.
     A. A description of Mexico's political culture.
     B. A discussion of Mexico's political socialization process.
20. Political Interaction and Articulation Between People and Government.
     A. Voter participation.
     B. Campaigns and elections.
     C. Political parties and interest groups.
21. Governmental Institutions.
     A. The structure of government.
     B. The function of government.
22. An Evaluation of Mexico.
     A. Public policy.
     B. Performance.
     C. The future.
23. An Overview of the Course.
     A. A compare and contrast of the four countries.

Assignments:
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1.  Read and study appropriate chapters in textbooks (30-50 pgs. per
   week.)
2.  Regular attendance and extensive notetaking in class is expected
   and assumed.
3.  Preparation for in-class, closed book, no notes essay exams.
4.  Term paper (approx. 5-7 pgs.)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 50%
Term papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
50 - 70%
IDENTIFICATION, ESSAY EXAMS
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Gabriel Almond and B. Powell, COMPARATIVE POLITICS TODAY, 7th ed.,
  Prentice-Hall, 2000.
Charles Hauss, COMPARATIVE POLITICS: DOMESTIC RESPONSES TO GLOBAL
  CHALLENGES, 3rd ed., Wadsworth Publishing, 2000.
Thomas Magstadt, NATIONS AND GOVERNMENTS: COMPARATIVE POLITICS IN
  REGIONAL PERSPECTIVE, 3rd ed., Bedford/St. Martin's Publisher, 1998.

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