SRJC Course Outlines

12/5/2020 1:33:32 AMEQSCI 25 Course Outline as of Fall 2004

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  EQSCI 25Title:  EQUINE SCIENCE  
Full Title:  Equine Science
Last Reviewed:4/13/2015

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled3.0017.5 min.Lab Scheduled52.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  AG 25

Catalog Description:
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A survey of the equine industry including selection, feeding, breeding, facilities, handling and diseases will be emphasized to ensure scientifically based management decisions.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A survey of the equine industry including selection, feeding, breeding, facilities, handling and diseases will be emphasized to ensure scientically based management decisions.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: AG - AS 116L Equine Science SRJC Equivalent Course(s): EQSCI25

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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The student will be able to:
1.  Review common horse diseases and parasites and their control.
2.  Evaluate horses by live analysis and performance information.
3.  Demonstrate knowledge of horse reproduction as it pertains to sound
   management.
4.  Identify a minimum of eight common breeds of horses and assess their
   differences.
5.  Design horse handling facilities with cost analysis of preparation
   for marketing of equine.
6.  Demonstrate ground safety around horses.
7.  Demonstrate basic health care and grooming.
8.  Have reasonable accommodations made to perform all learning
   objectives regardless of physical and/or learning disabilities.
9.  Identify cultural contributions and ethnic influences on the horse
   industry.
10. Describe career opportunities and requirements for successful
   employment.
11. Describe the values, themes, methods, and history of the discipline
and identify realistic career objectives related to a course of study in
the major.
12. Perform research specific to the discipline and use appropriate
citation style, if different than MLA.

Topics and Scope
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1.  Unit One: History and Development of the Horse Industry
   a. Evolution and domestication of the horse
   b. Historical and cultural uses
   c. Economic importance
2.  Unit Two: Horse Breeds and Classes
   a. Origin and adaptation
   b. Classes
   c. Major uses
3.  Unit Three: Equine Selection
   a. Functional anatomy
   b. Selection
   c. Evaluation of unsoundness
   c. Vices
4.  Unit Four: Breeding and Reproduction
   a. Stallion management
   b. The mare
   c. Gestation
   d. Foal management
5.  Unit Five: Feeding and Nutrition
   a. Digestion and utilization of feed
   b. Nutrient requirements
   c. Pasture management
6.  Unit six: Disease and Parasites
   a. Common equine health problems
   b. Parasite Control
   c. Health programs
7.  Unit Seven: Equine Facilities and Equipment
   a. Ranch lay-out
   b. Facilities
   c. Equipment identification
8.  Unit Eight: Basic Horsemanship
   a. Finances of keeping a horse
   b. Ground safety
   c. Basic horse handling
9. Orientation to the values, themes, methods, and history of the
discipline and identification of realistic career objectives related to a
course of study in the major.
10. Introduction to discipline-specific research tools, including seminal
books, important periodicals, major indexing sources, professional or
trade organizations, standard reference tools, discipline specific tools,
and major web sites.

Assignments:
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Assignments will be taken from periodicals, handouts, and texts.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
20 - 30%
Written homework, Essay exams, Term papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 20%
Lab reports, Quizzes, Exams
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
20 - 40%
Class performances
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Multiple choice, True/false, Matching items, Completion
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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THE HORSE, 3rd Edition, J.M. Kays, Arco Publishing, New York.
HORSES, 2nd Edition, J. Warren Evans, W.H. Freeman & Company.

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