SRJC Course Outlines

5/5/2021 11:18:38 PMANSCI 171 Course Outline as of Spring 2011

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ANSCI 171Title:  BEHAVIOR & HUMANE MGMT  
Full Title:  Livestock Behavior and Humane Management
Last Reviewed:1/22/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum1.00Lecture Scheduled1.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled17.50
Minimum1.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total1.00 Contact Total17.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  35.00Total Student Learning Hours: 52.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  AG 280.65

Catalog Description:
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Introduction to livestock behavior and the evolution of behavioral traits.  Introduces practical handling concepts and facilities design, to facilitate low-stress methods of livestock management.  Explores the benefits of keeping animals calm, including safer working conditions, higher yields of marketable product, better-quality product, and more humane conditions.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Introduction to livestock behavior and the evolution of behavioral traits.  Introduces practical handling concepts and facilities design, to facilitate low-stress methods of livestock management.  Explores the benefits of keeping animals calm, including safer working conditions, higher yields of marketable product, better-quality product, and more humane conditions.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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The student will:
1)  Recognize and understand basic terms and concepts of livestock behavior, including the history and science of ethology.
2)  Identify and understand the basic processes that shape livestock behavior.
3)  Assess the relevance of livestock behavior to humane handling.
4)  Apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills to develop humane livestock handling systems and facilities.
5)  Acquire the technical skills necessary for humane handling of cattle, sheep, goats, swine and horses in a field setting.

Topics and Scope
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1)      History of ethology
a)      Domestication
b)      Ethics
2)      Benefits of humane handling
a)      Working conditions
b)      Animal Product quality
c)      Quality of Life
3)      Animal Perception
a)      Genetics influences
b)      Learned behavior
i)      Critical periods
ii)      Learning and training
c)      Stress
i)      Perceptions
ii)      Sensations      
4)      Handling Livestock
a)      Predator Prey Patterns
b)      Handling practices that use animal instinct
i)      Gathering
ii)      Movement
iii)      Crowding
iv)      Sorting
v)      Transportation
vi)      Processing
5)      Species Specific Handling Facilities
a)      Cattle Handling
i)      Design
(1)      Location and layout
(a)      Curved systems
(b)      Solid siding
(c)      Corrals
(d)      Footing
ii)      Restraint practices
b)      Swine Handling
i)      Design
(1)      Location and layout
(a)      Curved systems
(b)      Solid siding
(c)      Pens
(d)      Footing
ii)      Restraint practices
c)      Sheep Handling
i)      Design
(1)      Location and layout
(a)      Curved systems
(b)      Solid siding
(c)      Corrals
(d)      Footing
(2)      Restraint practices
d)      Goat Handling
i)      Design
(1)      Location and layout
(a)      Curved systems
(b)      Solid siding
(c)      Corrals
(d)      Footing
(2)      Restraint practices
e)      Horse Handling
i)      Design
(1)      Location and layout
(2)      Restraint practices

Assignments:
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1.  Read periodicals, handouts, and texts (20 to 30 pages per week)
2.  Facilities design
3.  Quizzes, tests, mid-term and final exam
4.  Practical skills exam

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments and skill demonstrations are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 10%
Facilities design
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
40 - 55%
Practical skill demonstrations
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
35 - 50%
Multiple choice, True/false, Matching items, Completion
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Humane Livestock Handling: Understanding livestock behavior and building facilities for healthier animals.  By Temple Grandin  Publisher Storey Publishing (2008).
 
The following texts are classics in the field:
Social Behavior in Farm Animals   By Linda J. Keeling, Harold W. Gonyou. Publisher CABI (2001)
The Ethology of Domestic Animals: an introductory text.   By Per Jensen Publisher CABI (2002)
Animal Domestication and Behavior   By Edward O. Price CABI (2002)
Principles of Animal Behavior  By  Lee Alan Dugatkin  1st edition, 2004

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