SRJC Course Outlines

4/22/2021 10:27:43 PMAODS 90 Course Outline as of Summer 2010

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  AODS 90Title:  INTRO ALCOHOL/DRUG STUD  
Full Title:  Introduction to Alcohol and Drug Studies
Last Reviewed:10/12/2020

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  HLE 95

Catalog Description:
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This course reviews the field of alcohol and other drug abuse. The course will study the history of alcohol and other drug abuse and its impact on American society and the family. It includes an overview of theories of substance abuse and identification of signs and symptoms, as well as treatment resources and myths of abuse.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course reviews the field of alcohol and other drug abuse. The course will study the history of alcohol and other drug abuse and its impact on American society and the family. It includes an overview of theories of substance abuse and identification of signs and symptoms, as well as treatment resources and myths of abuse.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Spring 1999Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon completion of the course, students will:
 
1.  Identify models and theories of addiction.
2.  Recognize past and present social policy conflicts regarding drug use in American society,
     such as alcohol prohibition and medical marijuana.
3.  Describe the most generally accepted and scientifically supported models of
      treatment in recovery, relapse prevention and other substance-related problems.
4.  Recognize the importance of family, social network and community support in alcohol
      and other drug recovery.

Topics and Scope
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I. Models and theories of addiction
    A. Etiological, moral, disease, and behavioral theories of addiction
    B. Emerging research
II. Social, political and economic context of substance abuse
    A. Core theoretical concepts on beliefs and attitudes about addiction
    B. Roles of counselor in the field of addiction
    C. Gambling, sexual, internet and work addiction; anorexia nervosa
    D. Properties of stimulants (cocaine, amphetamines, narcotics) pharmacology and biology
    E. Properties of legal drugs (alcohol, nicotine, tobacco, caffeine), prescription drugs
III. Social policy regarding drug use - past and present
    A. Historical dimensions: cultural attitudes toward addiction and drug use and everyday life;
          drug consumption profiles and preferences; societal (including legal and criminal justice) responses
    B. Political dimensions: cultural attitudes toward addiction and drug use and everyday life; drug
          consumption profiles and preferences; societal (including legal and criminal justice) responses;
          addiction/drug policy and direct practice/treatment approaches
    C. Addiction in the context of the "War on Drugs"
    D. The regulation of drugs
    E. Current issues and debates in the field of addiction
IV. Overview of current programs and services, including but not limited to:
    A.  Outpatient treatment
    B.  Withdrawal management (detoxification)
    C.  Day treatment
    D.  Residential treatment
    E.  Supportive recovery and other treatment services (transitional living, hospital based
           substance misuse programs, needle exchange and methodone treatment, dual diagnosis
           programs, pregnancy support)
    F.  Family, school and community based prevention programs
    G. Basic principles of abstinence based AA and twelve step addiction treatment
    H. Family members, ALANON
     I. Cognitive therapy
V. Importance of family and community in addiction prevention and treatment
    A. Gender, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity in addiction counseling
    B. Family and friends in addiction recovery
    C. First Nations perspectives on addiction and addiction treatment
    D. Community development, locality development, social planning and social action
    E. Street work and outreach; focused harm reduction
VI. Importance of research in addiction prevention
    A. Substance abuse and mental disorders
    B. Substance abuse and eating disorders
    C. Addiction as a field of practice in social work; differential approaches to practice.

Assignments:
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READING ASSIGNMENTS:
1.  Textbook: 35-40 pages per week.
2.  Three to five outside reading assignments given by the instructor.
WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:
Student will be required to complete three term papers.  Each term paper will be 3-5 pages in length on issues related to substance abuse.  
EXAMS:
Students will be given a midterm and final exam, and at least two additional short exams on material covered in class.  Midterm and final will include essay questions.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 40%
Written homework, Reading reports, Term papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
60 - 70%
Multiple choice, essay
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Substance Abuse Counseling: Theory and Practice, 4/E. Stevens, Patricia and Smith, Robert L.  Prentice Hall: 2008  
 
Drugs, Society, and Human Behavior with PowerWeb(11th Edition). Ksir, Charles J., Hart, Carl L. and Ray, Oakley S. McGraw-Hill: 2006
 
Concepts of Chemical Dependency (7th edition). Doweiko, Harold. Brook Kole: 2009
 
Instructor prepared materials

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