SRJC Course Outlines

5/5/2021 11:22:19 PMENVS 12 Course Outline as of Fall 2008

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ENVS 12Title:  INTRO ENVIRON SCIENCE  
Full Title:  Introduction to Environmental Science
Last Reviewed:1/27/2020

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Introduction to environmental issues from a scientific perspective, focusing on physical, chemical, and biological processes within the Earth system, the interaction between humans and these processes, and the role of science in finding sustainable solutions.  Topics include contemporary environmental issues related to resource use, pollution, and human population growth.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100 or ESL 100. Eligibility for ENGL 1A.

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Introduction to environmental issues from a scientific perspective, focusing on physical, chemical, and biological processes within the Earth system, the interaction between humans and these processes, and the role of science in finding sustainable solutions.  Topics include contemporary environmental issues related to resource use, pollution, and human population growth.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100 or ESL 100. Eligibility for ENGL 1A.
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1985
Inactive: 
 Area:C
H
Natural Sciences
Global Perspective and Environmental Literacy
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 B1Physical ScienceFall 1985
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 5APhysical SciencesFall 2008
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1985Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1985Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.      Summarize the first two laws of thermodynamics and the law of conservation of mass and identify specific ecological and environmental consequences of these laws.
 
2.      Diagram energy flow through an ecosystem and the cycling of matter within an ecosystem and use the resulting models to examine specific environmental issues.
 
3.      Use population and community dynamics to examine specific environmental issues and the sustainability of specific solutions.
 
4.      Utilize demographic data and models to evaluate the relationship between human population dynamics and current/future environmental issues.
 
5.      Identify major environmental legislation and discuss the scientific basis of the legislation.
 
6.      Identify social, economic, and cultural considerations related to specific environmental issues and analyze their effects on solving environmental problems.
 
7.      Analyze personal environmental impact and how specific personal decisions affect resource use and pollution; extrapolate findings to a larger community.
 
8.      Research, evaluate, and cite information from newspapers, magazines, scientific journals, books, websites, and personal communications.
 
9.      Interpret and construct scientific tables, graphs, and figures.  

Topics and Scope
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1. Introduction to Environmental Science
      A. Scientific methodologies
      B. Role of science in solving environmental problems
      C. Interpreting scientific tables, graphs, and figures
      D. Finding and evaluating scientific information
      E. Brief environmental history of the United States
      F. Categories and underlying causes of major environmental issues
      G. Environmental sustainability
2. Ecological Principles
      A. Energy flow through ecosystems      
            1) Energy forms and the laws of thermodynamics
            2)  Food chains
            3)   Bioaccumulation and biomagnifications of contaminants
      B. Cycling of matter within ecosystems
            1) Conservation of mass
            2)   Biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, water)
            3)   Feedback mechanisms
      C. Earth's physical environment
      D. Populations:  evolution, population ecology, human demographics
      E. Biological communities:  species interactions, ecological niche, succession
3. Biodiversity
      A. Scientific basis:  importance, hotspots, endangered and threatened species, invasive species, ecological restoration
      B. Legislation:  Endangered Species Act
      C. Social, economic, and/or cultural impacts/considerations
4. Water
      A. Water as a resource
            1) Properties and importance
            2)  Resource issues:  flooding, drought, groundwater depletion, salinization, wetland loss
            3)  Water conservation and management:  agricultural, industrial, and municipal use;  wastewater reuse; grey-water recycling
            4)  California and Sonoma County water resources and use
            5)  Personal water use
      B. Water Pollution
            1) Types, sources, and effects of water pollution
            2)    Improving water quality
            3)   Wastewater and drinking water treatment
      C. Legislation:  Safe Drinking Water Act, Clean Water Act
      D. Social, economic, and/or cultural impacts/considerations
5. Air
      A. Air as a resource:  properties and importance
      B. Air pollution: types, sources, effects, solutions
      C. Regional and global atmospheric changes:  causes, effects, solutions
            1) Global climate change
            2) Ozone depletion
            3)  Acid deposition
      D. Legislation:  Clean Air Act, Kyoto Protocol, Montreal Protocol
      E. Social, economic, and/or cultural impacts/considerations
6. Energy
      A. Units for energy and power
      B. Conservation and efficiency
      C. Fossil fuels:  types, origin, availability, pros and cons, new technologies
      D. Nuclear energy:  types, pros and cons, safety, radioactive waste
      E. Renewable energy:  types, pros and cons, new technologies
      F. Energy strategies:  national, local, personal
      G. Social, economic, and/or cultural impacts/considerations
7. Solid and Hazardous Waste
      A. Solid waste:  types, sources, disposal methods, environmental impacts
      B. Hazardous waste:  types, sources, disposal methods, environmental impacts
      C. Waste prevention:  reduction, reuse, recycling
      D. Legislation:  Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Superfund Act
      E. Social, economic, and/or cultural impacts/considerations  

Assignments:
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1.  Textbook reading and/or assigned reading from journals, newspapers, websites, and peer-reviewed or popular journals. Reading will vary depending on the topic, but will average approximately 20-30 pages per week (based on a 17.5 week semester)
2.   In class and homework activities.  (e.g.  calculations, model development and use, discussions, debates, research, short answer responses, individual or group presentations.)
3.   Three to five short (2-3 page) writing assignments that focus on summary, analysis, and evaluation.  (e.g. fieldtrip reports, current event analysis, personal ecological footprint, personal carbon budget, energy audit, product life-cycle costs, review of a scientific paper)
4.   Research/analysis paper (4-8 pages) on a local/regional environmental issue.  The paper will require research, analysis, and bibliographic documentation.
5.   Two to five examinations based on reading and lecture material.  Exams may be cumulative or unit exams, and will include a combination of objective and written responses.  
6.   One or two field trips.  Field trips may be scheduled during or outside of class hours.  Students will be given several options to choose from and may work with the instructor to develop additional options.  

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
25 - 50%
Research paper, field-trip reports, current-event reports
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 10%
Calculations, homework problems, model development and use
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Essay exams, objective exams (multiple choice, true/false, matching, short answer)
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 15%
Individual and group presentations, participation in class activities and fieldtrips


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Environment.  Raven, Berg, and Hassenzahl (6th).  Wiley:  2008.
Environmental Science.  Wright, Richard (10th).  Prentice Hall:  2008.
Environmental Science:  Principles, Connections, and Solutions (12th).  Miller and Spoolman.  Brooks & Cole. 2008.
Environmental Science:  A Global Concern (10th). Cunningham and Cunningham. McGraw Hill. 2008.
Students will also read journal and newspaper articles and the websites of local, national, and international government agencies and environmental interest groups.  

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