SRJC Course Outlines

8/13/2022 6:12:31 AMHIST 8.1 Course Outline as of Fall 2008

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  HIST 8.1Title:  LATIN AMERICA TO 1830  
Full Title:  History of Latin America from Pre-Columbian to 1830
Last Reviewed:1/28/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
An introductory survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to the independence movements of the early 19th century.  This course will examine the history of Indigenous societies before European colonization, the development of the European colonial system and the complexity of the independence movements from Europe.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An introductory survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to the 1830s.  This course will examine the history of Indigenous societies, the development of the European colonial system and independence movements from Europe.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2008
 D6History  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981Fall 2008
 D5Geography  
 D6History  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981
 4FHistory  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.  Demonstrate critical thinking and analytical skills by utilizing
   methods of inquiry used by historians and other social and
   behavioral scientists.
2.  Utilize and recognize that history is a process of interaction
   between factual sources and those who interpret them.
3.  Integrate  geographical knowledge with cultural and historical
   knowledge to understand the development of modern day Latin
   American countries.
4.  Examine, evaluate, and discuss the experiences, roles, achievements,
   and contributions of the Indigenous and African American people in
   Latin America from the Pre-Columbian era to the 19th-century wars
   of independence.
5.  Examine and evaluate European colonial, social, political, economic,
   and cultural institutions in the shaping of Indigenous, Black,
   Mestizo, and Mulatto communities in Latin America.
6.  Analyze the historical roots of racism, and the impact on
   ethnic conflict in Latin America.
7.  Examine the role of Latin American women in their struggle for
   equality.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
I.    Historical Background
     A.  Introduction to the Indigenous societies - Mexica (Aztec),
         Mayan, and Quechua (Inca) prior to European settlement
     B.  Participation of women in Indigenous societies
II.  Spanish Conquest
     A.  European and Indigenous societies collide
     B.  Establishment of the slave system in the Caribbean
     C.  Hernan Cortez, Mexico, and history of Quetzalcoatl
III.  The Colonial Period
     A.  Development of a caste socio-economic system
     B.  Participation of Mulattoes and Mestizos in
         Colonial Spain and Portugal
     C.  Conversion to Christianity and the destruction of
         Indigenous institutions
IV.   Independence Movements
     A.  Criollo discontent with the economic and political system
     B.  Women's intellectual and societal participation within
         the Indigenous Mestizo, Black, and Mulatto communities
V.    Building New Societies in Latin America
     A.  Internal political and economic conflicts between conservative
         and liberal ruling classes
     B.  Emergence of the Mestizo middle class and the struggle
         for equality

Assignments:
Untitled document
1.  Weekly text reading assignments, approximately 80 pages, or 1-2
   chapters in text and anthologies.
2.  Analysis of text readings, lectures, films, and in-class writing
   exercises.
3.  Participate in discussions as directed by the instructor.
4.  Two in-class essay exams and one final examination.
5.  An assigned book review of 4-6 pages.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 50%
Analytical, expository; reviews, research papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Essay exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Attendance and participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
Untitled document
Brown, Jonathan C., LATIN AMERICA:  A SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE COLONIAL
  PERIOD, 2006.
Carmack, Robert, THE LEGACY OF MESOAMERICA:  HISTORY AND CULTURE OF A
  NATIVE AMERICAN CIVILIZATION, 2006.
De las Casas, Bartolome, A SHORT ACCOUNT OF THE DESTRUCTION OF THE INDIES,
  2004.

Print PDF