SRJC Course Outlines

2/9/2023 12:50:34 AMETHST 73 Course Outline as of Fall 2022

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ETHST 73Title:  INTRO TO ASIAN AMERICAN  
Full Title:  Introduction to Asian American Studies
Last Reviewed:10/11/2021

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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While Asian Americans are often seen as forever-foreigners, they are inextricably woven into the fabric of the United States. Students will learn the diverse and complex experiences and origins of Asian Americans; this course will explore the epistemologies, intersectional identities, histories, and societal impact of Americans of East Asian, Pacific Islander, South Asian, and Southeast Asian descent.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
While Asian Americans are often seen as forever-foreigners, they are inextricably woven into the fabric of the United States. Students will learn the diverse and complex experiences and origins of Asian Americans; this course will explore the epistemologies, intersectional identities, histories, and societal impact of Americans of East Asian, Pacific Islander, South Asian, and Southeast Asian descent.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2022
Inactive: 
 Area:G
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 FEthnic StudiesFall 2022
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2022Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2022Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Not Certificate/Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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1. Critically summarize the diverse epistemologies, experiences, and intersectional identities of Asian Americans.
2. Critically examine significant social and political issues within various Asian American communities.
3. Critically analyze the laws and policies that shaped early Asian American history and continue to impact Asian American communities today.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
In order to achieve these learning outcomes, during the course students will:
1. Describe the impact of exclusionary immigration laws on shaping the early Asian American demographic.
2. Identify the major Asian American communities, their current demographics, push and pull reasons for immigration, US ethnic identity formation, resistance and change, and agency.
3. Analyze the role racism and xenophobia play in Asian American community development.
4. Examine the diverse, intersectional experiences of Asian Americans.
5. Analyze the stereotypes and imagery of Asian Americans.
 
Ethnic Studies Objectives:
1. Analyze and articulate concepts such as race and racism, racialization, ethnicity, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization, sovereignty, imperialism, settler colonialism, and anti-racism as analyzed in Asian American Studies.
2. Apply theory and knowledge produced by Asian American communities to describe the critical events, histories, cultures, intellectual traditions, contributions, lived-experiences and social struggles of those groups with a particular emphasis on agency and group-affirmation. 
3. Critically analyze the intersection of race and racism as they relate to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, language, and/or age in Asian American communities. 
4. Critically review how struggle, resistance, racial and social justice, solidarity, and liberation, as experienced and enacted by Asian Americans are relevant to current and structural issues such as communal, national, international, and transnational politics as, for example, in immigration, reparations, settler-colonialism, multiculturalism, language policies. 
5. Describe and actively engage with anti-racist and anti-colonial issues and the practices and movements in Asian American communities to build a just and equitable society.

Topics and Scope
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Each category below should use writings and theory developed by Americans of East Asian, Pacific Islander, South Asian, and Southeast Asian descent.
 
I. Concepts
    A. Race and racism
    B. Racialization
    C. Ethnicity
    D. Equity
    E. Ethnocentrism
    F. Eurocentrism
    G. White supremacy
    H. Self-determination
    I. Liberation
    J. Decolonization
    K. Sovereignty
    L. Imperialism
    M. Settler colonialism
    N. Anti-racism
II. Asian American Origins in the United States
    A. Immigration history and patterns
    B. Major political and economic policies and impact on Asian Americans
    C. Colonialism and U.S. military occupation
    D. Theoretical perspectives
III. Family and Community
    A. Assimilation pressures
    B. Generational differences
    C. Ethnic enclaves
    D. Theoretical perspectives
IV. Gender & Sexuality
    A. Gender roles and identities
    B. Queer activism
    C. Theoretical perspectives
V. Racism
    A. Model minority myth and stereotypes
    B. Race and ethnic relations in the U.S.
    C. Anti-Asian violence
    D. Media representations
    E. Theoretical perspectives
VI. Social Justice and Identity
    A. Political participation
    B. Social movements
    C. Activism and Agency
    D. Theoretical perspectives

Assignments:
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1. Reading assignments (30-50 pages/week)
2. Exam(s) (1 - 2)
3. Final exam or final project
4. 2 - 3 essays (up to 2500 words total)
5. Additional assignments such as:
    A. Discussion/Class Participation
    B. Community activities/civic engagement project
    C. Presentation(s)
    D. Reading logs or quizzes

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
40 - 60%
Essays or other written assignments
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
30 - 50%
Exam(s); final exam or final project
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Discussion/Class Participation, Community activities/civic engagement project, Presentation(s), Reading logs, or quizzes


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Stand Up: An Archive Collection of the Bay Area Asian-American Movement, 1968-1974. Asian Community Center Archive Group. Berkeley Eastwind Books. 2009 (classic)
 
Asian America: Sociological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives. 2nd ed. Dhingra, P & Rodriguez, R. M. Cambridge Polity Press. 2021.
 
Asian American Feminisms and Women of Color Politics. Fujiwara, Lynn. University of Washington Press. 2018.
 
Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning, One World. Hong, Cathy Park. 2020.
 
The Making of Asian America. Lee, Erika. Simon and Schuster. 2016 (classic)
 
Flashpoints for Asian American Studies. Schlund-Vials, Cathy. Fordham University Press. 2017.
 
Keywords for Asian American Studies. Schlund-Vials, Cathy, Wong, Scott K, & Trinh Vo, Linda (Eds.). NYU Press. 2015 (classic)
 
Strangers from a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans. Takaki, R. NY Back Bay Books. 1998 (classic)
 
Contemporary Asian America: A Multidisciplinary Reader. 3rd ed. Zhou, M. & Gatewood, J. V. (Eds.). New York Press. 2016 (classic)
 
Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People. Zia, Helen. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 2001 (classic)

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