SRJC Course Outlines

3/1/2021 7:34:22 PMNRM 63 Course Outline as of Fall 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  NRM 63Title:  ENV ED  
Full Title:  Environmental Education
Last Reviewed:2/22/2021

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled3.008 min.Lab Scheduled52.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  FOR 63

Catalog Description:
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Principles and applied techniques used to explain natural and cultural resources to the park and museum visitor. Exploration and application of most current environmental education curricula.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100 or appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Principles and applied techniques used to explain natural and cultural resources to the park and museum visitor. Exploration and application of most current environmental education curricula.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100 or appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Describe natural and cultural resources to the park and museum visitor.
2.  Apply principles of the most current environmental education curricula.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.  Describe the principles and methods of environmental interpretation.
2.  Accept and develop the role of interpretation and public relations in supporting organizational management objectives.
3.  Plan and present interpretive programs, utilizing audio/visual equipment, photography, and computer graphics.
4.  Interact with organizations and practitioners involved in the field of interpretation.
5.  Evaluate effectiveness of a variety of interpretive services.
6. Explore and apply the most current environmental education curricula.

Topics and Scope
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I.  Roots of and Reasons for Interpretation
   A. History of interpretation
   B. Interpretation defined
   C. Interpreters
II. Values of Interpretation
   A. Principles of interpretation
   B. Clients
III. Practicing  Interpretation
   A. Preparing and presenting a talk
   B. Presenting a guided tour
   C. Using visual aids
     1. Computer generated presentations
     2. Computer generated graphics
     3. PowerPoint
     4. Storyboards
   D. Historic and cultural interpretation
   E. Interpretation for children
   F. Environmental education curricula planning and practice
IV. Interpretive Planning Model
   A. Planning and preparing exhibits
   B. Self-guided tours/trails
V.  Management of Interpretive Programs
   A.  Education
   B.  Organization
   C.  Personnel management

Assignments:
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Representative assignments:
1. Readings in assigned texts and handouts, averaging 15 - 20 pages per week.
2. Class field trips.
3. Interpretation site visits and written evaluations (4 sites and 2-3 pages for each evaluation).
4. Group interpretive technique demonstration (15 - 20 minutes).
5. Midterm and final exam.
6. Final interpretive project: thematic presentation.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 20%
Site visits and written evaluations.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
40 - 60%
Class performances, performance exams
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
20 - 40%
Multiple choice, true/false, matching items, completion, short answer.
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Class and field trip attendance/participation.


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Interpreting Our Heritage. Tilden, Freeman. The University of North Carolina Press, 2008.
Environmental Interpretation. Ham, Sam. Fulcrum Publishers, 1993.
Sharing Nature with Children II. Cornell, Joseph. Dawn Publishing, 1999.
(Textbooks are classics in the field.)

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