SRJC Course Outlines

2/23/2018 11:45:42 PMLIR 30 Course Outline as of Fall 2014

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  LIR 30Title:  INTRO INFO LIT RESEARCH  
Full Title:  Introduction to Information Literacy for Research Projects
Last Reviewed:3/24/2014

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum1.00Lecture Scheduled1.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled17.50
Minimum1.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total1.00 Contact Total17.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  0Total Student Learning Hours: 0 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  LIR 50

Catalog Description:
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The course focuses on research methods and strategies for preparing research projects. Topics include developing search strategies, gathering and evaluating sources, organizing ideas, and using an appropriate citation style.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 OR ESL 100 AND familiarity with basic computer operations.

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
The course focuses on research methods and strategies for preparing research projects. Topics include developing search strategies, gathering and evaluating sources, organizing ideas, and using an appropriate citation style.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 OR ESL 100 AND familiarity with basic computer operations.
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive:Fall 2016
 Area:I
Information Literacy
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:Fall 2016
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2003Inactive:Fall 2016
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
 
1. Recognize specific needs for information.
2. Identify and develop an idea for a topic.
3. Formulate a thesis statement and develop a search strategy.
4. Identify appropriate information sources for defined needs.
5. Use available information tools to locate and retrieve relevant
  information.
6. Critically evaluate information sources using specified information
  competency criteria (e.g. source quality, relevancy, date, etc.) for
  initial appraisal and content analysis.
7. Organize the topic, revise a thesis statement, and develop an outline
  in order to synthesize and integrate new and existing information.
8. Select and apply an appropriate citation and bibliographic style.
9. List and discuss the ethical, legal, and socio-political issues
  surrounding information and information technology.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course students will demonstrate the academic
research process including (a) selecting a topic (b) finding and
evaluating appropriate resources and (c) adhering to proper guidelines for
use and citation of sources.

Topics and Scope
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Topics will include:
 
I. Thesis statement
  A. Importance - orients paper
  B. Form - e.g. if/then; cause and effect, etc.
  C. Structures, ideas, and argument
II. Search methods and search strategies appropriate to a variety of
   specific tools
   A. Thesis statement as basis for locating information within the
      library's various databases
   B. Search features and options
      1. Truncation/wildcards
      2. Boolean operators
      3. Controlled vocabulary and keywords
      4. Search limits and advance features
   C. Evaluating search success and modifying search (broaden, narrow,
      etc.)
   D. Retrieving books, articles and other materials in the library in a
      variety of formats
   E. Options for getting materials not available in the local library.
III. Purpose and use of resources
    A. Reference resources for background information
       1. Biography and directory information
       2. Data and statistics
       3. Dictionaries and handbooks
       4. Bibliographies and indexes
    B. Online catalog (SRJC and remote) access to book records and
       bibliographic elements describing a book
    C. Periodical access through print and online indexes and
       bibliographic (citation) elements for periodicals
    D. World Wide Web (WWW)
       1. Web pages and sites
       2. Subject directories and search engines
       3. Links and bookmarks
IV. Concept Formation
   A. Working from general to specific
   B. Translating ideas into the terminology found in catalogs, indexes,
      and readings
   C. Pursuing bibliographic references and WWW links
V. Resources and effective note taking
  A. Citations for books, periodicals and internet sources
  B. Descriptive, evaluative annotations
  C. Responsible use of copyrighted material
VI. Critically evaluating resources found based on:
   A. Authority of the author
   B. Date, edition, publisher/journal
   C. Evidence about intended audience
   D. Evidence of objective reasoning
   E. Coverage (primary; secondary; scholarly vs. popular;
      extensive vs. marginal; foundation vs. update)
   F. Writing style; references; URLs
   G. Published reviews of the resource
VII. Mechanics of writing a paper
    A. Outline
    B. References, documentation formats, and styles
    C. Annotated bibliography
    D. Permissible uses of intellectual property
       1. Differentiating between "fair use" and plagiarism
       2. Identifying copyrighted information

Assignments:
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1. Written assignments on thesis development, the evaluation of sources, and the selection of relevant sources to support a focused thesis
2. Library tour and/or resource locator worksheets
3. Group or individual written/oral presentations
4. Written outline and/or project with an annotated bibliography
5. Quizzes, final exam and/or midterm

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
15 - 40%
Written homework, short essays, final project
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
35 - 60%
Homework problems, individual or group oral/written presentations
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
10 - 25%
in class research assignment
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
10 - 35%
Multiple choice, true/false, completion, quizzes, final exam
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 15%
Attendance and participation


Representative Textbooks:
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Instructor prepared materials. Check the bookstore.
Supplemental Texts:
 
The College Student's Research Companion:  Finding, Evaluating, and Citing the Resources You Need to Succeed.  5th edition.  Quaratiello, Arlene Rodda and Jane Devine. Neal Schuman, 2011.
 
Concise Guide to Information Literacy. Lansing, Scott. Libraries Unlimited. 2012.

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