SRJC Course Outlines

9/20/2018 1:30:13 AMLIR 10 Course Outline as of Fall 2013

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  LIR 10Title:  INTRO TO INFO LITERACY  
Full Title:  Introduction to Information Literacy
Last Reviewed:5/13/2013

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum1.00Lecture Scheduled1.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled17.50
Minimum1.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total1.00 Contact Total17.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  0Total Student Learning Hours: 0 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  LIR 59

Catalog Description:
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An introductory course to learn and apply the skills needed to conduct research efficiently and effectively.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Course Eligibility for ENGL 1A and Course Completion of CS 101A

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An introductory course to learn and apply the skills needed to conduct research efficiently and effectively.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Course Eligibility for ENGL 1A and Course Completion of CS 101A
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2000
Inactive: 
 Area:I
Information Literacy
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2000Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2001Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
 
1.  Analyze a research need
2.  Find information effectively and efficiently by using a variety of search techniques
3.  Access needed information in multiple publication formats
4.  Evaluate the quality and relevance of information sources
5.  Recognize several ethical and legal issues related to the use of information

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
 
A. Analyze a research question:
 1. Articulate a research need
 2. Determine the scope of a research need
 3. Broaden or narrow a research need to fit the scope of a lower-division undergraduate
     research assignment
 
B. Find information effectively and efficiently by using a variety of search techniques:
 1. Identify various types of information sources, such as reference works, popular periodicals,
     scholarly journals, etc.
 2. Choose appropriate sources based upon the research need
 3. Identify major concepts from the research need to be used as keywords
 4. Use basic search techniques, such as keywords, Boolean operators, search limiters, etc.
 5.  Use advanced search techniques, such as field searching, truncation, wildcards, etc.
 6.  Evaluate search success and modify search strategies accordingly
 
C. Access needed information in multiple publication formats:
 1.  Use the item record to determine the means of access
 2.  Retrieve information from digital sources
 3.  Locate print sources in the library
 
D. Evaluate the quality and relevance of information sources:
 1.  Assess the quality of information sources based upon authority, objectivity, purpose and scope
 2.  Determine the importance of the publication date in the context of the research need
 3.  Determine the appropriateness of information based upon its relevance to a research need
 
E. Identify several ethical and legal issues related to the use of information:
 1.  Describe differences between summarizing, quoting, paraphrasing and plagiarizing information
 2.  Document sources in accordance with an academic style guide (APA or MLA)
 3.  Describe the role of copyright in relationship to sources, including digital media
 4.  Identify elements in a bibliographic citation

Topics and Scope
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Topics will include:
I.  Analysis of a research question
   A.  Context of a research need (personal, academic, discipline-specific, course-
         specific)
   B.  Refinement of a research need
   C.  Scope of a research need
   
II. Finding information effectively and efficiently by using a variety of search techniques
   A.  Types of information resources (popular, scholarly, primary, secondary, tertiary, etc.,
         both online and in print)
   B.  Selection of appropriate resources (reference books, periodicals, monographs.,
          etc., both online and in print)
   C.   Keywords and major concepts
   D.   Basic search techniques (keywords, Boolean operators, search limits, etc.)
   E.   Advanced search techniques (controlled vocabulary, truncation, wildcards,
          nesting, field searching, phrase searching, etc.)
   F.   Modification of search strategies based upon the success of a search (using
          appropriate tools, altering keywords)
 
III. Accessing needed information in multiple publication formats
   A.   Using the item record to determine means of access
   B.   Information retrieval from digital sources
   C.   Locating print resources by using Library of Congress call numbers
 
IV. Evaluating the quality and relevance of information sources
   A.   Authority
   B.   Objectivity
   C.   Scope
   D.   Purpose
   E.   Currency and context of research need
   F.   Relevance
 
V. Identifying several ethical and legal issues related to the use of information
   A.   Summary, quotations, paraphrasing, citing, plagiarism
   B.   In-text citations and works cited/reference list
   C.   Copyright and online sources
   D.   Elements of bibliographic entries

Assignments:
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Representative assignments:
 
1.  1-2 homework assignments to assess the application of skills for each of the
     learning outcomes (5-10 assignments)
2.  1-2 class exercises tied to each of the learning outcomes (5-10 class exercises)
3.  1 term-long project, such as an annotated bibliography, a research journal or similar
     indicator of engagement and skill in the research process
4.  Quizzes, midterm and/or final exam

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
20 - 50%
Written responses to short-answer questions, written summaries of the content of sources, written evaluations of the quality of information sources, written assessment of the research process.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
15 - 30%
Homework assignments and class exercises that call for the development of strategies or plans to solve research problems or resolve ineffective searches.
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 30%
Homework assignments and class exercises to demonstrate search and retrieval skills.
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
15 - 50%
Testing may include quizzes, midterms, and a final. Questions on exams are typically multiple choice, true/false, matching items, short answer and short essay.
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 20%
Attendance and participation.


Representative Textbooks:
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Required reading may consist of handouts and web documents provided by instructor.
Sample texts for required or recommended reading:
The College Student's Research Companion:  Finding, Evaluating, and Citing the Resources
You Need to Succeed.  5th edition.  Quaratiello, Arlene Rodda and Jane Devine. Neal Schuman, 2011.

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