SRJC Course Outlines

7/31/2021 2:10:01 AMCS 5 Course Outline as of Summer 2017

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CS 5Title:  COMPUTER LITERACY  
Full Title:  Computer Literacy
Last Reviewed:8/24/2015

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled1.004 min.Lab Scheduled17.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total4.00 Contact Total70.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 175.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  CIS 5

Catalog Description:
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Designed for the transfer student and/or the person wanting a broad knowledge of computer concepts. No previous experience with computers is required or assumed. This course presents an overview of computers in our world today, how they work, how they are used and their impact on society. Students will be introduced to the Internet and World Wide Web, basic programming concepts and productivity software including word processing, spreadsheet, presentation and database software.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Designed for the transfer student and/or the person wanting a broad knowledge of computer concepts. No previous experience with computers is required or assumed. This course presents an overview of computers in our world today, how they work, how they are used and their impact on society. Students will be introduced to the Internet and World Wide Web, basic programming concepts and productivity software including word processing, spreadsheet, presentation and database software.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1983
Inactive: 
 Area:B
Communication and Analytical Thinking
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1983Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1983Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable

Approval and Dates
Version:07Course Created/Approved: 8/1/1981
Version Created:11/8/2016Course Last Modified:6/5/2021
Submitter:Abe FarkasCourse Last Full Review:8/24/2015
Version Status:Approved Changed CoursePrereq Created/Approved:8/24/2015
Version Status Date:11/28/2016Semester Last Taught:Spring 2021
Version Term Effective:Summer 2017Term Inactive:


COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.   Recognize the capabilities and limitations of computer technology, and the theoretical foundations of computing.
2.   Critically assess the social and ethical implications of computer technology in their daily life.
3.   Improve problem solving and critical thinking through the application of scientific knowledge using hands-on activities.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. Identify the components and function of the hardware used in a computer system.
2. Describe the function of system software.
3. Describe the function of application software.
4. List the steps in systems analysis and design.
5. Describe the popular programming languages and the process of developing computer software.
6. Create a simple computer program.
7. Analyze the impact of computer technology and its ethical implication on society.
8. Demonstrate basic proficiency of productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, database and multimedia software.
9. Demonstrate proficiency in electronic communications technology.
10. Explain basic computer networking concepts and architecture.
11. Use the Internet and World Wide Web to perform research.
12. Create a basic Web page.
13. Demonstrate proficiency in social networking.
14. Discuss computer security and its importance for business and personal use of computers.

Topics and Scope
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 1.  Computer Literacy as a Necessary Skill in the 21st Century
    a.  Becoming a Savvy Computer User and Consumer
    b.  Computers in Today's Careers
    c.  Understanding the Challenges Facing a Digital Society
2.  The History of Computer Technology
3.  Computer Hardware
    a.  Input Devices
    b.  Processing (System Unit)
        i.  Central Processing Unit
       ii.  The Machine Cycle
      iii.   Random Access Memory
    c.  Output Devices
    d.  Storage Devices
4.  Using the Internet and World Wide Web
    a.  Communicating Through the Internet: E-Mail and Other Technologies
    b. Social Networking
    c.  Web Entertainment: Multimedia and Beyond
    d.  Conducting Business over the Internet: E-Commerce
    e.  Managing Malware and Online Annoyances
    f.  Accessing the Web: Web Browsers
    g.  Searching the Web: Search Engines
    h.  The Internet and How It Works
     i.  The Cloud
     j.  The Future of the Internet
5.  Information Technology Ethics
6.  Application Software
    a.  Word-Processing Software
    b.  Spreadsheet Software
    c.  Presentation Software
    d.  Database Software
    e.  Graphics and Multimedia Software
     f.   Web Design Software
7.  System Software
    a.  Operating Systems
    b.  Utility Programs
    c.  File Management
8.  Computer Networking
    a.  Networking Fundamentals
    b.  Network Architectures
    c.  Network Components
    d.  Wireless Networks
    e. Personal Area Networks
9.  Computer Security
    a.  Computer Threats (Hackers, Viruses)
    b.  Computer Safeguards (Antivirus Software and Other Security Measures)
10.  Mobile Computing
    a.  Mobile Computing Devices
    b.  Portable Media Players
    c.  Smartphones and mobile devices
    d.  Notebooks
11.  Software Programming
    a.  The Binary Numbering System
    b.  Low Level Programming Languages
    c.  High Level Programming Languages
12.  Databases and Information Systems
    a.  Database Types
    b.  Data Mining and Data Warehouses
    c.  The Systems Development Lifecycle
    d.  Systems Analysis

Assignments:
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1.  Read approximately 30 pages per week from the textbook.
2.  Written homework and reading reports that review recently-covered topics.
3.  Problem solving exercises requiring the use of spreadsheets and database management software.
4.  Complete laboratory exercises in operating systems and word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and other application software.
5.  Individual and/or team projects may include research and write-up of computer related articles on the web or technology magazines, interviews and reports, writing a basic program, team presentations on current trends in technology.
6.  Quizzes, midterm, and final examinations

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
20 - 65%
Written homework and reading reports
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
5 - 20%
Problem solving exercises
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 20%
Projects
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
20 - 65%
2-4 Quizzes, midterm, and final examination
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Attendance and participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Technology In Action (10th), Evans, Alan. Poatsy, Mary Anne. Martin, Kendall.  Prentice Hall:  2013.
 
Skills for Success Using Microsoft Office 2013, by Townsend, Kris. Gaskin, Shelley. Hain, Catherine. Murrewolf, Stephanie.  Pearson Publishing:  2013.

OTHER REQUIRED ELEMENTS

Student Preparation
 Matric Assessment Required:ERequires English Assessment
 Prerequisites-generate description:NPNo Prerequisite
 Advisories-generate description:AAuto-Generated Text
 Prereq-provisional:NNO
 Prereq/coreq-registration check:NNo Prerequisite Rules Exist
 Requires instructor signature:NInstructor's Signature Not Required
   
BASIC INFORMATION, HOURS/UNITS & REPEATABILITY
 Method of instruction:02Lecture
 04Laboratory
 72Internet-Based, Delayed Interaction
 71Internet-Based, Simultaneous Interaction
 Area department:CSComputer Studies
 Division:72Arts & Humanities
 Special topic course:NNot a Special Topic Course
 Program Status:1Both Certificate and Major Applicable
 Repeatability:00Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
 Repeat group id:  
   
SCHEDULING
 Audit allowed:NNot Auditable
 Open entry/exit:NNot Open Entry/Open Exit
 Credit by Exam:NCredit by examination not allowed
 Budget code: Program:0000Unrestricted
 Budget code: Activity:0701Computer & Information Science
   
OTHER CODES
Disciplines:Computer Information Systems
 Basic Skills:NNot a Basic Skills Course
 Level below transfer:YNot Applicable
 CVU/CVC status:YDistance Ed, Not CVU/CVC Developed
 Distance Ed Approved:YEither online or hybrid, as determined by instructor
 Emergency Distance Ed Approved:YFully Online
Partially Online
Online with flexible in-person activities
 Non-credit category:YNot Applicable, Credit Course
 Classification:YLiberal Arts and Sciences Courses
 SAM classification:CClearly Occupational
 TOP code:0701.00Information Technology, General
 Work-based learning:NDoes Not Include Work-Based Learning
 DSPS course:NNO
 In-service:NNot an in-Service Course
 Lab Tier:21Credit Lab - Tier 1

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