SRJC Course Outlines

11/18/2019 6:34:55 PMSURV 52 Course Outline as of Summer 2008

Inactive Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  SURV 52Title:  INTRO TO PHOTOGRAMMETRY  
Full Title:  Introduction to Photogrammetry
Last Reviewed:2/9/2004

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  CEST 52

Catalog Description:
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Introduction to the theory and practice of Photogrammetry including image systems and quality, theory of stereo-photography, orientation and design of stereo models.  Design and operating principles of stereo plotting, photogrammetric and orthophoto mapping and project planning.  All students should have a basic understanding of the principles and practices of plane surveying prior to taking this course.  

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
CEST 50B (formerly CET 50B) or equivalent with grade of "C" or better.


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Introduction to the theory and practice of Photogrammetry including image systems and quality, theory of stereo-photography, orientation and design of stereo models.  Design and operating principles of stereo plotting, photogrammetric and orthophoto mapping and project planning.  
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:CEST 50B (formerly CET 50B) or equivalent with grade of "C" or better.
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:
1.  Define and illustrate the general principles and applications of
photogrammetry.
2.  List and define the photographic process as it applies to aerial
mapping.
3.  Identify the types of optics used in aerial cameras.
4.  Determine and calculate the appropriate geometry for various focal
lengths and elevations of cameras relative to terrain conditions.
5.  Define and illustrate stereoscopy and its applications to aerial
mapping.
6.  Identify specific objects and features using aerial photography
interpretation techniques.
7.  Identify and calculate the appropriate stereo plotting equipment and
instruments.
8.  Describe and compute ground control and flight planning for aerial
mapping projects.  

Topics and Scope
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I. History and applications of photographic processes in surveying and
mapping
 A. History of photographic process
   1. film
   2. digital
 B. Applications
   1. topo mapping
   2. planometric mapping
   3. GIS (Geographic Information Systems)
II. Photographic process
 A. Optics
 B. Cameras
III. Photographic geometry in aerial photography
 A. Focal length
 B. Ground coverage
 C. Flying height
IV. Practical applications of stereoscopy
 A. Overlap
 B. Sidelap
V. Photo interpretation applications
 A. Mapping
 B. Orthophoto
VI. Stereo plotting equipment and instruments
 A. Types
 B. Procedures
 C. Use of
VII. Project Planning
 A. Ground control
 B. Flight planning
VIII. Special applications
 A. Analytic photogrammetry
 B. Bridging
 C. Orthophoto  

Assignments:
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1.  List and define the photogrammetric applications in topographic and
planimetric mapping.
2.  Define and calculate the appropriate camera systems for large and
small-scale mapping.
3.  Compute the photographic scales in aerial photography.
4.  Analyze and define objects of vertical aerial photography.
5.  Compute flying heights and altitudes of cameras in aerial
photography.
6.  Compute relief and radial displacement by aerial mapping techniques.
7.  Set up and operate Stereoscopic equipment for stereo viewing.
8.  Compute and layout flight lines and photographic overlap of neat
models.
9.  Prepare a flight plan for an aerial mapping project.
10. Compute and layout ground control for mapping projects.
11. Interpret and define objects in aerial photographs used by
engineers and surveyors.
12. List and define different remote sensing applications and
techniques used in photogrammetry.
13. Textbook reading assignments, approximately 40 - 50 page per week.
14. Three to five exams, including final.  

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments and skill demonstrations are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
30 - 40%
Homework problems
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
10 - 20%
Performance exams
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
30 - 40%
Multiple choice, Matching items, Completion, Problem solving.
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Class Participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Introduction to Modern Photogrammetry. Mikhail, Bethel, McGlone. J. W.
Wiley & Sons, 2001.  

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