SRJC Course Outlines

5/29/2024 7:51:47 AMSOC 30 Course Outline as of Fall 2024

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  SOC 30Title:  RACIAL INEQUALITIES  
Full Title:  Race, Ethnicity, and Inequality
Last Reviewed:11/27/2023

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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In this course, students will engage with sociological approaches to racial and ethnic inequalities. Students will analyze concepts and patterns of prejudice, privilege, discrimination, immigration, individual and institutional racism, decolonization, and antiracism. Course content will include lecture, activities, storytelling, media, and discussion, and will reflect the histories and lived experiences of California Community College Students.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
In this course, students will engage with sociological approaches to racial and ethnic inequalities. Students will analyze concepts and patterns of prejudice, privilege, discrimination, immigration, individual and institutional racism, decolonization, and antiracism. Course content will include lecture, activities, storytelling, media, and discussion, and will reflect the histories and lived experiences of California Community College Students.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
G
Social and Behavioral Sciences
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2012
 D0Sociology and Criminology  
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 DSocial ScienceFall 2011Summer 2012
 D0Sociology and Criminology  
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 D4Gender Studies  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1991Summer 2011
 D0Sociology and Criminology  
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D4Gender Studies  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981Summer 1991
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D4Gender Studies  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 2011
 4CEthnic Studies  
 4JSociology and Criminology  
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1991Summer 2011
 4JSociology and Criminology  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: SOCI 150 Introduction to Race and Ethnicity SRJC Equivalent Course(s): PSYC34 OR SOC30

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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1. Apply an intersectional sociological lens to identify the ways in which racism impacts everyone's lives and life chances.
2. Analyze ways in which they can adopt anti-racism in their everyday lives.
3. Apply their personal histories and lived experiences to course content.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
1. Analyze how one's personal history is shaped by the global legacies of racism and colonialism.
2. Understand that race is a socially-constructed concept with real-life consequences.
3. Appreciate the living cultures, cosmologies, and communities of indigenous populations.
4. Describe how historical patterns of access to property, power, and privilege have shaped race relations in the United States and laid the foundation for current patterns of racial and ethnic inequalities.
5. Analyze the sociological theories explaining the origins of individual forms of prejudice and discrimination.
6. Evaluate how ongoing racist public policies regulating housing, education, employment, political representation, transportation, healthcare, and other institutions impact the life chances of marginalized communities.
7. Evaluate historical institutional racism and current racist policies explaining historical and current disparities in the criminalization, policing, and mass incarceration of communities of color.
8. Understand past and current immigration patterns and analyze the challenges and resilience of immigrant communities.
9. Appreciate anti-racist social movements addressing racial inequalities from an intersectional lens, such as abolitionism, civil rights movements from the 1950s to present day, farmworkers' rights, indigenous land back movements, LGBTQ+ rights, feminisms, reproductive justice, immigration reform, affirmative action, criminal justice, decarceration, and #BlackLivesMatter.
10. Express their agency and voice in becoming anti-racists to bring about social justice in whatever shape or form they are able.

Topics and Scope
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I. Introduction
    A. Introspection
    B. Social construction and power
    C. Intersectionality
    D. Patterns of racial and ethnic inequalities in the U.S.
II. The 400+ Year History of Racism in the United States
     A. Colonization of Native lands and genocide of Indigenous populations
    B. Land grabs, forced migrations (e.g., the Trail of Tears), and forced resettlements
    C. Chattel slavery
    D. Reconstruction and Jim Crow segregation
    E. The Zoot Suit Riots and Juan Crow segregation
    F. Orientalism
    G. Imprisonment of Japanese and Japanese Americans during WWII
    H. Immigration quotas, exclusions, and unequal statuses
    I. War on Drugs
    J. Mass Incarceration
    K. Oil, missing women, and modern atrocities against Indigenous people and land
    L. Decolonization
III. Institutional Racism, Policies, and Resources
    A. Housing
    B. Education
    C. Employment
    D. Political representation
    E. Transportation
    F. Healthcare
     G. Anti-racist policies such as reparations, land back movements, and prison abolition (among others)
IV. Individual Racism
     A. Sociological theories of prejudice and discrimination
    B. Microaggressions
    C. Color-blind racism
    D. Implicit bias
    E. White fragility/privilege
    F.  Other -isms and discriminatory practices
V. Immigration
    A. Historical and current immigration patterns to the U.S.
    B. Racist foundations of discriminatory immigration policies and their consequences
    C. Present day issues of migrant labor, transnational work, and refugee movement and resettlement
VI. Social Movements
    A. Abolitionism
    B. Civil rights movements (1950s to present)
    C. Black feminist thought and intersectional feminisms
     D. Criminal justice
    E. Immigration reform and DACA
    F. #BlackLivesMatter
VII. Controlling Images and Stereotypes in the Mass Media
    A. Nation building and colonial propaganda
    B. White privilege and stereotypical representations in radio, photography, cinema, TV, and digital media
     C. Problems of diversity behind and in front of the camera
    D. Advocacy for greater diversity
VIII. Freedom Dreaming and Agency
    A. Acknowledgement of the colonizing mindset
     B. Equity from various cultural perspectives
     C. Social justice activism and agency

Assignments:
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1. Weekly reading assignments and/or multimedia engagement
2. Quizzes and/or exams on material from lectures, readings, and other media
3. Writing assignments (cumulative total of at least 1500 words) across media such as:
     A. Class exercises
    B. Personal reflections
    C. Reaction papers
    D. Research projects
    E. Journal entries
    F. Online discussions
    G. Annotations
    H. Media analyses
4. Additional assignments as determined by instructor may include:
    A. Group projects
    B. Class presentations
    C. Video presentations
    D. Ethnographic fieldwork
    E. Others

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
40 - 60%
Written assignments
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Quizzes and/or exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Additional assignments


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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How to be an Antiracist. Kendi, Ibram X. One World Publishers. 2019.
Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Class: The Sociology of Group Conflict and Change. Healey, Joseph F. and Andi Stepnick. Sage. 2022.
The Matrix of Race: Social Construction, Intersectionality, and Inequality. Coates, Rodney D. and Ferber, Abby L. and Brunsma, David L. Sage. 2021.
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Alexander, Michelle. New Press. 2020.
We want to do more than survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom. Love, Bettina. Beacon Press. 2019.
The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present. Treuer, David. Riverhead Books. 2019.
The Making of Asian America: A History. Lee, Erika. Simon & Schuster. 2015 (classic).
Strangers from a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans. Takaki, Ronald. Little, Brown & Co. 1998 (classic).
 
Open Educational Resources (OER):
Race and Ethnic Relations in the U.S.: An Intersectional Approach. Gutierrez, Erika et al. https://socialsci.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Social_Justice_Studies/Race_and_Ethnic_Relations_in_the_U.S.%3A_An_Intersectional_Approach Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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