SRJC Course Outlines

9/22/2019 1:54:40 PMSOC 1 Course Outline as of Fall 2017

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  SOC 1Title:  INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY  
Full Title:  Introduction to Sociology
Last Reviewed:1/23/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An exploration of American society from several levels of analysis including face-to-face social interaction, groups, and institutions. This exploration is accomplished through the use of lectures, small group interaction, multimedia and guest speaker presentations.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An exploration of American society from several levels of analysis including face-to-face social interaction, groups, and institutions. This exploration is accomplished through the use of lectures, small group interaction, multimedia and guest speaker presentations.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2011
 D0Sociology and Criminology  
 DSocial ScienceFall 2010Fall 2011
 D0Sociology and Criminology  
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981Fall 2010
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981
 4JSociology and Criminology  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: SOCI 110 Introduction to Sociology SRJC Equivalent Course(s): SOC1

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Explain and apply the major theories, concepts, and methodologies of sociology
2.  Analyze society and social groups using a sociological perspective
3.  Evaluate structures and policies of major American social institutions
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
 
1. Describe the sociological perspective in contrast to individualistic analysis
2. Explain the major theoretical perspectives in sociology and how they can be applied
3. Describe and apply the major research methods used by sociologists
4. Explain the sociological concept of self and the process of socialization
5. Analyze various sociological patterns of everyday life and interactions
6. Describe the importance of groups to the shaping of individuals and societies
7. Explain the meanings and components of social class as well as the consequences of
     social location
8. Evaluate issues related to group relations in the United States
9. Analyze social institutions such as education, medicine, or others using a sociological
     framework
10. Discuss and explore American society in a global context

Topics and Scope
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I. Introduction to the Sociological Perspective
    A. Historical origins of the discipline
    B. Contemporary applications
II. Major Theoretical Perspectives in Sociology
    A. Symbolic Interactionism
    B. Functionalism
    C. Conflict Theory
III. Conducting Research in Sociology
    A. Ethnography
    B. Surveys
    C. Interviews
    D. Content analysis
    E. Secondary sources
IV. Socialization and the Self
    A. Concepts defined
    B. Agents of socialization
V. Everyday Life and Interaction
    A. Impression management
    B. Social construction
VI. The Study of Groups
    A. Types of groups
    B. Group dynamics
VII. Stratification of American Society
    A. The social class system
    B. Consequences of social class in everyday life
VIII. Ethnic and Racial Relations
     A. Historical factors
    B. Current issues affecting different groups
IX. Major American Social Institutions
    A. Education
    B. Health and health care
    C. Politics
    D. Economy

Assignments:
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1. Read 20-30 pages per week.
2. Take three to four exams, including one final on material from lectures, readings and videos.
3. Writing assignments ( minimum of 1500 words).   Examples include:  homework, essays,
     in-class exercises, research papers.
4. At the discretion of the instructor, provide group presentations and participate in in-class
    exercises.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
40 - 60%
Writing assignments
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Three to four exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Student Presentations


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Society: The Basics. 14th ed. Macionis, John. Prentice Hall. 2016
Sociology. 11th ed. Newman, David. Sage. 2016
Sociology: A Down-To-Earth Approach. 13th ed. Henslin, James. Pearson. 2016
You May Ask Yourself. 4th ed. Conley, Dalton. Norton. 2015

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