SRJC Course Outlines

7/20/2019 5:27:21 PMPSYCH 34 Course Outline as of Fall 2017

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  PSYCH 34Title:  PREJUDICE/DISCRIMINATION  
Full Title:  The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination
Last Reviewed:12/12/2016

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course examines systems of privilege, oppression, and institutionalized discrimination that influence and help maintain perceptions of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, and their psychological consequences. Racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism are the major areas addressed with an emphasis on Native, African, Mexican/Latino, and Asian/Pacific Island American populations. Social movements organized within and among racial and ethnic groups that address institutional inequalities in U.S. society will also be analyzed.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course examines systems of privilege, oppression, and institutionalized discrimination that influence and help maintain perceptions of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, and their psychological consequences. Racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism are the major areas addressed with an emphasis on Native, African, Mexican/Latino, and Asian/Pacific Island American populations. Social movements organized within and among racial and ethnic groups that address institutional inequalities in U.S. society will also be analyzed.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
G
Social and Behavioral Sciences
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 ELifelong Learning and Self DevelopmentFall 1981
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981
 4IPsychology  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: SOCI 150 Introduction to Race and Ethnicity SRJC Equivalent Course(s): PSYCH34 OR SOC30

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Explain the historical and current realities of privilege and oppression, with
     members of the dominant culture and with members of oppressed groups,
     in order to demonstrate an understanding of the psychological consequences of both.
2. Analyze the theoretical concepts of social construction and social dominance
     as an explanation for discrimination and oppression.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Examine the history of racial formations and social construction.
2. Evaluate major psychological theories on privilege, prejudice, and discrimination.
3. Distinguish what elements of social structure work to maintain systems of stratification
     based on constructions of difference.
4. Define and analyze the dimensions of racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism.   
5. Recognize patterns of ethnic relations, such as assimilation and pluralism.
6. Evaluate the systemic relationship between social class and ethnicity.
7. Examine the relationship of gender-based stereotypes to heterosexism.     
8. Analyze patriarchy and the system of sexism.
9. Compare the consequences of racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism on
     Native American, African American, Mexican/Latino, and Asian/Pacific Island American
     populations.    
10. Identify ways to bridge differences, dismantle systems of oppression, and become agents
     of change.

Topics and Scope
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I. Introduction of Concepts
     A. Distinguish between prejudice, discrimination, and oppression    
     B. Definitions and terms
     C. Classification and categorization      
II. Psychological Research and Theories on Privilege, Prejudice, and Discrimination   
     A. Peter Rose's "Nature of Prejudice and Patterns of Discrimination" research
     B. Peggy McIntosh's "White Privilege" theory
    C .Ronald Takaki's multicultural research on difference
     D. Intergroup relations theory  
III. The Social Construction of Difference
    A. Berger and Luckman's "Construction" theory
    B. Michel Foucault "Social Construction Transformation" theory
    C. Perception and recall or social information  
     D. Origins, transmission, and maintenance of stereotypic beliefs  
IV. Common Elements of Oppression: Domination and Subordination  
     A. Authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and empathy  
     B. Social ideologies (i.e., religion and political orientation)  
     C. Social dominance orientation
    D. Internalized dominance and subordination
V. Systemic Oppression and Racism   
     A. Lillian Roybal Rose's "Systematic Oppression" theory
    B. Gloria Yamato's theory on "Naming Racism"
    C. Marilyn Fry's "Double-Bind Oppression" theory  
     D. Derald Wing Sue's theory on "Microaggressions"   
VI. White Privilege, Oppression, and Difference
    A. Systems of privilege
    B. White benefits and middle class privilege
    C. Cost of racism to white people
    D. Becoming allies
VII. Social Class and Inequality
    A. Class consciousness
    B. Ethnicity and social class
    C. Feminism and class power
    D. Class hierarchy
VIII. Patriarchy: The System of Sexism
     A. Development of gender-based prejudice
     B. Systems of patriarchy
     C. Feminism and patriarchal domination
     D. Masculinity and dominance
IX. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Experience
    A. Homophobia
    B. Anti-gay stereotypes
    C. Bias attitudes, prejudice, and oppression
X. Native American Experience
    A. Stereotyping, values, and social structure
    B. Pan-Indianism
    C. Relocation and assimilation
    D. Reservation and urban Indians
XI. African American Experience
    A. Slavery and institutionalized racism
    B. Stereotyping and segregation
    C. Immigration patterns and cultural adjustment
    D. West Indian and Black American assimilation
XII. Latino/Mexican American Experience
    A. Cultural attributes and differentiation
    B. Stereotyping and bias attitudes
    C. Immigration and racism
    D. Chicano, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Caribbean, Central & South Americans
XIII. Asian/Pacific Island American Experience
    A. Model-minority stereotype
    B. Cultural attributes and differentiation
    C. East and Southeast Asians
    D. West Asian and Middle Eastern Americans
XIV. Interrupting the Cycle of Oppression: Becoming Allies & Embracing Difference
    A. Stereotype suppression
    B. Effectiveness of intergroup contact
    C. Educational and workplace intervention
    D. Valuing and managing diversity

Assignments:
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1. Read approximately 35-70 pages per week and discuss assigned material from the
     textbook and supplements.   
2. One to three writing assignments (minimum of 1,250 words total).
3. One to three midterm exams and a final examination.
4. Oral presentations and/or group projects may also be assigned.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 35%
Writing assignments (minimum of 1250 words)
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
65 - 80%
Midterm exams and final
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Group projects and oral presentations


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Meaning of Difference: American Constructions of Race, Sex and Gender, Social Class, Sexual Orientation, and Disability. 7th ed. Rosenblum, Karen and Travis, Toni-Michelle. McGraw Hill. 2015
The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination. 3rd ed. Whitley Jr., Bernard and Kite, Mary. Routledge. 2016
Race, Class, and Gender in the United States:  An Integrated Study. 10th ed. Rothenberg, Paula. Worth Publishers. 2016

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