SRJC Course Outlines

9/28/2020 8:40:34 PMPHYS 1 Course Outline as of Summer 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  PHYS 1Title:  INTRO PBLM SOLVING  
Full Title:  Introduction to Physics Problem Solving
Last Reviewed:2/25/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An introduction to basic concepts in physics with an emphasis on the development of problem solving skills. This course helps prepare students for success in Physics 20 or Physics 40.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of MATH 154 OR MATH 155 OR MATH 156 OR higher (MATH) OR appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An introduction to basic concepts in physics with an emphasis on the development of problem solving skills. This course helps prepare students for success in Physics 20 or Physics 40.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of MATH 154 OR MATH 155 OR MATH 156 OR higher (MATH) OR appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1994
Inactive: 
 Area:B
Communication and Analytical Thinking
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 B1Physical ScienceFall 1996
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1994Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1994Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Define and identify basic physical laws, theories, and principles applicable to mechanics.
2.  Interpret and generate the appropriate graphs and diagrams that represent the evolution of
    physical systems and events in mechanics.
3.  Organize and interpret word problem information and apply the related laws and equations to
    generate and explain solutions to one- and two- dimensional problems in mechanics.
4.  Work in groups to analyze, solve, and present solutions to problems in mechanics.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Students will be able to:
1. Define the physics quantities used in mechanics including: displacement, velocity,
    acceleration, force, energy, work, power, momentum, and impulse.
2. Identify the major unit systems and convert between them.
3. Organize and interpret written problem statements.
4. Describe basic concepts in mechanics and selected additional physics topics.
5. Generate and/or interpret graphs of physics quantities related to mechanics.
6. Generate free body diagrams and use them in the correct application of Newton's Laws.
7. Apply the equations of mechanics to the solution of selected simple physics problems.
8. Apply interpersonal skills to work in teams to solve physics problems.

Topics and Scope
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I. Problem Solving Tools, Strategies, and Algorithms
    A. Interpretation of written problem statements
    B. Written description or analysis of applicable physics concepts
    C. Choice of appropriate mathematical models and equations
    D. Organization of information and assignment of variables
    E. Interpretation and generation of diagrams and graphs
II. Units and Dimensional Analysis
    A. The international system (SI)
    B. The centimeter, gram, second system (CGS)
    C. The British engineering system (BE)
    D. Common metric prefixes
    E. Conversion of units
    F. Unit consistency in equations
III. One-Dimensional Kinematics
    A. Concepts, definitions, and units of displacement, velocity and acceleration
    B. Graphs of displacement, velocity and acceleration versus time
    C. Slopes of displacement and velocity versus time graphs and areas under velocity and
         acceleration versus time graphs
    D. Equations for uniformly accelerated motion in one dimension
    E. Freefall body problem analysis
IV. Vectors and Trigonometry
    A. Scalar and vector quantities
    B. Components of vectors and right triangle trigonometry
    C. Sums of vectors
V. Two-Dimensional Kinematics
    A. Separation of coordinate directions
    B. Equations of two-dimensional kinematics
    C. Projectile motion
VI. Forces and Newton's Laws of Motion
    A. Concepts, definitions, and units of mass, force and weight
     B. Newton's third law and force interactions between objects
    C. Newton's first law and the construction of free body diagrams
    D. One- and two-dimensional statics
    E. Newton's second law and free body diagrams with acceleration
    F. One- and two-dimensional linear dynamics
VII. Work, Energy, and Power
    A. Concepts, definitions, and units of work, energy, and power
    B. Calculation of work done using force and displacement data and graphs
    C. Kinetic and potential energy
    D. Conservative and non-conservative forces
    E. Conservation of energy
    F. Computation of power
 
Optional Physics Topics:
Faculty should choose 2-6 additional topics of interest to broaden exposure and encourage further investigations, such as:
I.    Impulse and momentum
II.   Newton's universal law of gravity
III.  Rotational kinematics and dynamics
IV.  Simple harmonic motion
V.   Fluids, statics and dynamics
VI.  Temperature, heat, thermodynamics
VII.  Waves and sound
VIII. Electricity and magnetism
IX.   Optics
X.    Superconductivity
XI.    Radioactivity
XII.   Fusion and Fission
XIII. Special relativity
XIV. Subatomic particles

Assignments:
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1. Homework problem sets (12-20)
2. Exams (2-4)
3. Quizzes (0-10)
4. Worksheets (to be completed in groups, in-class) (0-15)
5. Final exam

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
15 - 30%
Homework problem sets
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
60 - 80%
Exams, quizzes, final exam
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Class participation, worksheets


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Physics. 11th ed. Cutnell, John and Johnson, Kenneth. Wiley. 2018
Essentials of College Physics. Serway, Raymond and Vuille, Chris. Cengage Learning. 2007 (Classic)
Instructor prepared materials

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