SRJC Course Outlines

12/13/2019 10:21:41 PMPHIL 7 Course Outline as of Fall 2018

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  PHIL 7Title:  MORAL ISSUES  
Full Title:  Contemporary Moral Issues
Last Reviewed:10/23/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An introduction to modern and classical moral theories and their application to selected contemporary moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, and privacy.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An introduction to modern and classical moral theories and their application to selected contemporary moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, and privacy.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:E
Humanities
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C2HumanitiesFall 1981
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3BHumanitiesFall 1981
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: PHIL 120 Introduction to Ethics SRJC Equivalent Course(s): PHIL7

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Form well-reasoned judgments about philosophical arguments concerning
     moral issues.
2.  Apply philosophical theories to current moral issues.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts in ethics.
2. Describe, analyze, and evaluate moral theories.
3. Analyze and evaluate specific philosophical arguments involved in representative
     contemporary moral issues.
4. Compare, contrast, and evaluate the application of modern and classical moral theories to
     contemporary moral issues.

Topics and Scope
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I. Moral concepts
    A. Moral values
    B. Intrinsic and extrinsic values
    C. Normative Ethics
     D. Applied Ethics
    E. Relativism and absolutism
    F. Moral reasoning
    G. Moral standing
II. Moral theories, including:
    A. Utilitarianism
    B. Contract theory
    C. Kantianism
    D. Natural Law Theory
    E. Moral rights
     F. Virtue ethics
     G. Other
III. Factual background for representative moral issues
    A. Euthanasia
     B. Abortion
    C. Animal rights
    D. Privacy
    E. Capital Punishment
     F. War and terrorism
     G. Homosexuality
     H. Hate speech
     I. Other  
IV. Philosophical theories and arguments involved in representative moral issues
     A. Natural law as applied to homosexuality
     B. Right to life as applied to abortion
     C. Justice as applied to capital punishment
     D. Just War Theory as applied to war and terrorism
     E. Harm Principle as applied to animal rights
     F. Utilitarianism as applied to animal rights
     G. Other

Assignments:
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1. Reading assignments of approximately 20 pages per week from course texts and
     supplementary materials
2. Quizzes based on the reading assignments (5 - 15)
3. Take-home or in-class essay exams (2 - 17)
4. Term paper on a moral issue of at least 1250 words
5. Final examination typically includes multiple choice, short answer, in-class or take-home essay

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 60%
Term papers and written papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
30 - 60%
Quizzes, exams, and final examination that typically includes multiple choice, essay, or short essay
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Participation and attendance


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Taking Sides:  Clashing Views on Controversial Moral Issues. 14th ed. Sarris, Stephen. McGraw-Hill/Dushkin. 2015
The Elements of Moral Philosophy. 8th ed. Rachels, James and Rachels, Stuart. McGraw-Hill. 2014
The Right Thing to Do. 7th ed. Rachels, James and Rachels, Stuart. McGraw-Hill. 2014
Analyzing Moral Issues. 6th ed. Boss, Judith. McGraw-Hill. 2012 (classic)
Contemporary Moral Arguments: Readings in Moral Issues. 2 ed. Vaughn, Lewis. Oxford University Press. 2012 (classic)
Contemporary Moral Issues. 4th ed. Hinman, Lawrence. Prentice Hall. 2012 (classic)

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