SRJC Course Outlines

12/13/2019 10:35:39 PMPHIL 10 Course Outline as of Fall 2015

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  PHIL 10Title:  PHILOSOPHY OF PEACE  
Full Title:  Philosophy of Peace and Nonviolent Action
Last Reviewed:3/31/2014

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An inquiry into peace and nonviolence through study of the philosophers and historical movements of nonviolent practice. Stresses philosophical problems or philosophical themes and issues or methods of philosophical inquiry as they pertain to the concepts and practices of peace and nonviolence.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An inquiry into peace and nonviolence through study of the philosophers and historical movements of nonviolent practice.  Stresses philosophical problems or philosophical themes and issues or methods of philosophical inquiry as they pertain to the concepts and practices of peace and nonviolence.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2008
Inactive: 
 Area:E
Humanities
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C2HumanitiesFall 2008
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3BHumanitiesFall 2008
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2008Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2008Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Students will be able to form reasoned and well-informed judgments on current issues involving the development of peace and the nonviolent resolution of conflict both within and between individuals and social groups.
2.  Students will be able to develop philosophical methods for the understanding of and participation in the social and civic environment insofar as such engagement pertains to the development of peace and the nonviolent resolution of conflict in a global environment.
 

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Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Differentiate between philosophical approaches to peace and nonviolence and other disciplinary approaches:  e.g., religious, political, etc.
2. Explain philosophical origins of theory and practice of peace and nonviolence in Eastern, Western, and other intellectual traditions.
3. Examine key topics and questions within the literature of peace studies, e.g. concepts of peace and nonviolence, causes of peace and conflict, theories of human nature, and their accompanying conceptions of peace and conflict, etc.
4.  Summarize, analyze, and evaluate key arguments addressing the above topics.
5.  Analyze and evaluate contemporary applications of the above arguments.
6.  Critically evaluate the contributions and perspectives of women and ethnic minorities to the philosophy of peace.

Topics and Scope
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1.  Theories of human nature and their accompanying concepts of peace and conflict.
2.  Origins of nonviolent action in religious and secular sources.
3.  The nature of peace and nonviolence:  Overview of key theoretical approaches to questions of peace and nonviolence; explore modern philosophers of nonviolence, e.g. Henry David Thoreau, Leo Tolstoy, Mohandas K. Gandhi,   Martin Luther King Jr., Barbara Demming, Elise Boulding, Aung San Suu Kyi, Richard Taylor, Gene Sharp, Cesar Chavez, Sara Ruddick, Nel Noddings, Angela Davis, James Gilligan, Mary Midgley, and Margaret Mead.
4.  Pacifism:  Explore the possibilities and limits of pacifism.
5.  Feminism:  Explore the feminist perspective on the dominant philosophical tradition.
6.  Theory and Praxis of Nonviolence I:  Explore practical applications of nonviolent theory in the personal, political, economic, and environmental spheres.
7.  Theory and Praxis on Nonviolence II:  Examine empirical cases of nonviolent action in specific historical contexts.

Assignments:
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Assignments include but are not limited to:
1.  Regular reading assignments are from course texts and supplementary material. Typical reading assignments are 15-25 pages per week.
2.  Discussion of regular assignments.
3.  Quizzes cover the assigned readings.Quizzes may be either multiple choice or short essay.
4.  Midterm examination:  Students must write  essays in response to questions on material covered in class and in texts.
5.  Final examination: Students must write  essays in responseto questions on material covered in class and in texts.
6.  Writing requirements may be satisfied by an argumentative or philosophical research paper addressing an issue raised in class or in readings that defend a particular position on that issue.  Writing requirements may also be             satisfied by journal entries, reading responses or other written assignments (2500-5000 words per semester)
7.  Field work assignments would put to use concepts and strategies covered in the course.  Field work assignments would involve at least 2 hours of observation or active participation and would accompany a report,             presentation, or other writing assignment. Some examples of field work assignments may include, but are not limited to, thefollowing:
    a.  Volunteering with organizations working for the development of peace and nonviolence,  food assistance, conflict resolution, reduction of domestic violence, teen centers, or working with youth sports or after-school             programs, or programs for the development of community;
    b.  Attending, observing, or otherwise participating in a nonviolent direct action, such as a protest, demostration or rally;
    c.  Attending an educational event pertaining to nonviolent conflict resolution or the development of peaceful communities.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 75%
Written homework, Term paper optional, Journal entries
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
25 - 50%
Multiple choice, Short Essay, Quizzes, Essay Exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 20%
Field Work, Class participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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A Peace Reader:  Essential Readings on War, Justice, Non-Violence and World Order.   Armstrong, Richard and  Fakey, Joseph, Eds.  1992 (Classic)
 
Approaches to Peace, Barash,  David P.  2000 (Classic)
 
Cultures of Peace: The Hidden Side of History.  Boulding, Elise.  2000 (Classic)
 
The Essential Gandhi,  Gandhi, Mahatma. 1983 (Classic)
 
A Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict.  Ackerman, Peter  and  Duvall, Jack.  2001 (Classic)
 
Humanity a Moral History of the Twentieth Century.    Glover, Jonathan.  2001 (Classic)
 
Introduction to Peace Studies.  Barash, David P.  1991 (Classic)
 
Nonviolence in Theory and Practice,  3rd ed.  Holmes, Robert L.  and Gan, Barry L.   2012
 
Peace is the Way:  Writings on Nonviolence from the Fellowship of Reconciliation.  Wink, Walther.  Ed.   2000 (Classic)
 
Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s.   Epstein, Barbara.  1993 (Classic)
 
The Power of Nonviolence:  Writings by Advocates of Peace.  Zinn,  Howard  Ed.  2002 (Classic)
 
The Search for a Nonviolent Future.  Nagler,  Michael.  2001 (Classic)
 
There are Realistic Alternatives.   Sharp, Gene.  2004 (Classic)
 
Waging Nonviolent Struggle: 20th Century Practice and 21st Century Potential.  Sharp. Gene.  2005 (Classic)
 
Why Civil Resistance Works.   Chenoweth, Erica and Stephan, Maria J. 2012

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