SRJC Course Outlines

12/9/2022 7:59:59 AMMUSC 2C Course Outline as of Fall 2020

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  MUSC 2CTitle:  MUSIC THEORY 3  
Full Title:  Music Theory 3
Last Reviewed:4/22/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  MUS 2C

Catalog Description:
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An introduction to chromatic harmony through writing and analysis. Topics include: dominant and non-dominant seventh chords, secondary (applied) dominant and leading-tone chords, tonicization, modulation, binary and ternary forms, and an overview of larger forms.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of MUSC 2B


Recommended Preparation:
Concurrent enrollment in MUSC 3C AND concurrent enrollment in MUSCP 11C or another appropriate piano course

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An introduction to chromatic harmony through writing and analysis. Topics include: dominant and non-dominant seventh chords, secondary (applied) dominant and leading-tone chords, tonicization, modulation, binary and ternary forms, and an overview of larger forms.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of MUSC 2B
Recommended:Concurrent enrollment in MUSC 3C AND concurrent enrollment in MUSCP 11C or another appropriate piano course
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: MUS 140 Music Theory III SRJC Equivalent Course(s): MUSC2C

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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1.  Write four-part (soprano/alto/tenor/bass) arrangements with dominant and non-dominant
     seventh chords, secondary (applied) chords, tonicization, and modulation in the common-
    practice style.
2.  Analyze and explain the use of chromaticism, altered chords, tonicization, and modulation
     found in common-practice music.
3.  Analyze and compose short pieces in binary and ternary form.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
The student will be able to:
1. Identify, construct, and utilize dominant and non-dominant seventh chords
    in root position and inversion.
2. Identify, construct, and utilize secondary (applied) dominant and leading-tone chords.
3. Analyze and explain tonicization, common (pivot) chord modulation, and other
     modulation techniques.
4. Realize a figured bass line into a complete four-part arrangement utilizing these
     harmonic devices.
5. Harmonize a given melody in four parts utilizing these harmonic devices.
6. Analyze, compare, and contrast musical forms including binary, ternary, rounded binary,
    and other formal designs.

Topics and Scope
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I. Music for Study and Analysis
    Musical examples for this course will be drawn from the common-practice literature
     of the Western (European) tradition. The focus shall span from the chorales of Johann
    Sebastian Bach to the 18th- and early 19th-century Classical style, particularly
     the works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.
II. Dominant Seventh Chords
     A. The V7 in root position and inversions
     B. General voice-leading considerations
     C. Other resolutions of the V7
III. Non-Dominant Seventh Chords
     A. Spelling and voice-leading considerations
     B. Usage in functional progressions (typical resolutions)
IV. Secondary (Applied) Dominant and Leading-Tone Chords
     A. General principles of chromaticism and altered chords
     B. Spelling, function, and voice-leading of secondary chords
     C. Recognizing secondary chords in context
     D. Sequences involving secondary chords
     E. Deceptive resolutions of secondary chords
     F. Other uses of secondary chords
V. Modulations Using Common (Pivot) Chords
     A. Modulation vs. change of key
     B. Modulation vs. tonicization
     C. Modulation vs. modal interchange
     D. Key relationships (closely- and distantly-related keys)
     E. Locating and analyzing common chords
VI. Other Modulation Techniques
     A. Chromatic modulation
     B. Altered chords as common chords
     C. Sequential modulation
     D. Modulation by common tone
     E. Direct (phrase) modulation
VII. Introduction to Musical Form
     A. Formal terminology
     B. Simple and composite forms
     C. Binary forms
     D. Ternary forms
     E. Rounded binary forms
     F. Other formal designs
VIII. Overview of Larger Forms
     A. Sonata form
     B. Rondo form
     C. Sonata-rondo and other hybrid designs
IX. Introduction to Advanced Chromaticism (Neapolitan 6ths, Augmented 6ths, etc.)

Assignments:
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1. Reading assignments (10-15 pp./week) in the text, handouts, and/or online
2. Worksheet assignments (3-5 pp./week) in part writing and harmonization
3. Harmonic and formal analysis of compositions and excerpts from the literature
     (1-3 pp./week)
4. Online exercises to reinforce concepts learned in class (ungraded)
5. In-class quizzes and/or exams (2-4) and a comprehensive final examination
6. At least 2 major composition/arranging projects (one as a final project), realized in notation
    software, that utilize the techniques learned in the course
7. The final composition project shall include a brief oral presentation explaining the artistic
     motivation for the piece as well as the compositional processes used

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
25 - 55%
Part writing and analysis worksheets; Composition/arranging projects
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Quizzes/exams; Comprehensive final examination
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 15%
Attendance and class participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Music in Theory and Practice, Volume 1. 9th ed. Benward, Bruce and Saker, Marilyn. McGraw-Hill. 2015 (classic)
 
Tonal Harmony. 8th ed. Kostka, Stefan and Payne, Dorothy. McGraw-Hill. 2017
 
Instructor-prepared materials

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