SRJC Course Outlines

9/16/2019 4:11:42 PMMATH 101 Course Outline as of Summer 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  MATH 101Title:  MATH FOR AA/AS DEGREE  
Full Title:  Mathematics for the Associate Degree
Last Reviewed:2/27/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Four mathematics topics will be selected from functions, financial math, geometry, linear programming, probability and statistics, reasoning, and trigonometry.  This course fulfills the mathematics competency requirement for an associate degree from SRJC.  It is not recommended for students intending to transfer.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of Math 150B, or Math 151 or higher; or appropriate placement based on AB 705 mandates. See Student Success & Assessment Services for more information about guided and self-guided placement and placement using high school transcripts or self-reported high school transcript information


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Four mathematics topics will be selected from functions, financial math, geometry, linear programming, probability and statistics, reasoning, and trigonometry.  This course fulfills the mathematics competency requirement for an associate degree from SRJC.  It is not recommended for students intending to transfer.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of Math 150B, or Math 151 or higher; or appropriate placement based on AB 705 mandates. See Student Success & Assessment Services for more information about guided and self-guided placement and placement using high school transcripts or self-reported high school transcript information
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2012
Inactive: 
 Area:B
MC
Communication and Analytical Thinking
Math Competency
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Demonstrate proficiency in mathematical skills and conceptional understanding within four of
    the following topics: functions, financial math, geometry, linear programming, probability and
    statistics, reasoning, and trigonometry.
2.  Apply mathematical concepts to a variety of real-world problems.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to do the listed objectives from four of the following seven subject areas:
I. Functions
    A. Define function, domain, and range, and use function notation appropriately.
    B. Use a graphing calculator to analyze the graph of a function.
    C. Solve application and modeling problems that involve functions.
II. Financial Math
    A. Use simple interest, compound interest, future value, present value, and effective yield
         formulas to calculate unknown values.
    B. Use a graphing calculator to solve for unknown values.
    C. Create and explore amortization tables.
III. Geometry:  Instructor choice of at least three of the following objectives.
    A. Identify two- and three-dimensional shapes and use basic distance, area, surface area and
         volume formulae.
    B. Recognize, and apply appropriately, constructions, relationships and formulae involving
         quadrilaterals; sides and angles of triangles; parallel lines and planes; and chords,
         secants and tangents of circles.
    C. Describe and apply symmetry and rigid and non-rigid transformations.
    D. Use deductive reasoning to reach conclusions based on underlying axioms or previously
         proved theorems.
    E. Discuss and apply relationships in non-Euclidean geometry.
    F. Recognize types of graphs and use relationships between vertices and edges to discuss and
         solve problems  from graph theory.
IV. Linear Programming
    A. Graph systems of linear inequalities.
    B. Define the feasible region for a linear programming problem and calculate the vertices of
         the region.
    C. Calculate the optimum value or values of a function of two variables based on the graph of
         the feasible region.
    D. Solve application and modeling problems that involve linear programming.
V. Probability and Statistics
    A. Create and use graphical displays of data and frequency distributions.
    B. Define mean, median, mode, percentiles, variability and standard deviation and compute
         each for sets of data.
    C. Use laws of probability.
    D. Discuss linear regression and correlation, and use technology to compute regression
         equations for applied problems.
VI. Reasoning
    A. Apply inductive reasoning to patterns and sequences.
    B. Apply deductive reasoning to analyze statements and arguments using logic, Venn
         diagrams and set theory.
VII. Trigonometry
    A. Calculate the lengths of the sides of a triangle using the Pythagorean theorem.
    B. Define the basic trigonometric functions in terms of right triangle ratios with angles given
         in degrees.
    C. Use a calculator to find the values of basic trigonometric functions and angles.
    D. Solve application and modeling problems that involve trigonometry.

Topics and Scope
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Instructor will choose four of the following seven topics:
I. Functions
    A. Variation
    B. Rates of change
    C. Population growth
    D. Other applications and models
II. Financial Math
    A. Simple and compound interest
    B. Future value
    C. Present value
    D. Annuities
    E. Loans
    F. Effective yield
    G. Applicatons
III. Geometry
    Topics chosen from:
    A. Basic figures in geometry
    B. Deductive reasoning
    C. Parallel lines and planes
    D. Similarity and congruence
    E. Inequalities in geometry
    F. Right triangles
    G. Circles
    H. Constructions
    I. Areas and volumes
    J. Non-Euclidean Geometry
    K. Polyhedra
    L. Transformations and symmetries
    M. Graph theory
    N. Applications
IV. Linear Programming
    A. Linear modeling
    B. Optimization
    C. Applications
V. Probability and Statistics
    A. Counting techniques
    B. Probability rules
    C. Sampling and collecting data
    D. Organizing data
    E. Measures of center and spread
    F. Graphical display of data
    G. Linear regression
    H. Applications
VI. Reasoning
    A. Inductive reasoning including patterns and sequences
    B. Deductive reasoning including logic and sets
    C. Applications
VII. Trigonometry
    A. Angles
    B. Basic definitions
    C. Right triangles
    D. Pythagorean Theorem
    E. Applications

Assignments:
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1. Weekly reading (20-50 pages)
2. Problem set assignments from required text(s) or supplementary materials chosen by the
    instructor (1-6 per week)
3. Quizzes (0-4 per week)
4. Exams (3-8)
5. Projects (for example, computer explorations or modeling activities, 0-10)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
5 - 20%
Homework problems
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
60 - 95%
Multiple choice and free response exams; quizzes
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 25%
Projects


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Nature Of Mathematics. 13th ed. Smith, Karl. Brooks/Cole. 2016
Mathematics: A Human Endeavor. 3rd ed. Jacobs, Harold.  W.H. Freeman. 1994 (classic)
Instructor prepared materials

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