SRJC Course Outlines

10/1/2020 5:08:36 AMMATH 10 Course Outline as of Summer 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  MATH 10Title:  NATURE OF MATH  
Full Title:  Nature of Mathematics
Last Reviewed:10/22/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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A survey course in mathematical concepts and mathematics in culture. Topics to include mathematical reasoning and four additional topics selected from number theory, probability, statistics, mathematical modeling, contemporary applications, geometry, and the history of mathematics. Recommended for liberal arts students.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Completion of MATH 161 or MATH 154 or MATH 156 or MATH 155 or appropriate placement based on AB 705 mandates


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A survey course in mathematical concepts and mathematics in culture. Topics to include mathematical reasoning and four additional topics selected from number theory, probability, statistics, mathematical modeling, contemporary applications, geometry, and the history of mathematics. Recommended for liberal arts students.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Completion of MATH 161 or MATH 154 or MATH 156 or MATH 155 or appropriate placement based on AB 705 mandates
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:B
MC
Communication and Analytical Thinking
Math Competency
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 B4Math/Quantitative ReasoningFall 1981
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 2AMathematical Concepts & Quantitative ReasoningFall 1981
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Apply the principles of inductive and deductive reasoning.
2.  Demonstrate proficiency in mathematical skills and conceptual understanding within four
     of the following topics:  number theory, probability, statistics, mathematical modeling,
    contemporary applications, geometry, and the history of mathematics.
3.  Apply mathematical concepts to a variety of real-world problems.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
During this course, students will:
1. Define inductive reasoning, and apply to patterns and sequences.
2. Define deductive reasoning, and apply to logic and sets.
3. Demonstrate ability to perform four of the following objectives:
    A. Define various sets of numbers and use number systems of different bases.
    B. Apply counting techniques, permutations, combinations, and probability models.
    C. Define frequency distributions and measures of central tendency and dispersion, and create
         graphical displays of data.
    D. Apply mathematical models such as linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic, to
         real-world problems.
    E. Understand topics within contemporary mathematics, such as voting and apportionment,
         financial mathematics, graph theory, linear programming, and applications of matrices.
    F. Define and apply concepts of areas, volumes, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and
         selected other topics in geometry.
    G. Describe the historical development of mathematics, the role of theorem and proof in
         mathematical thought, and significant mathematical results and mathematicians.

Topics and Scope
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I. Mathematical Reasoning
    A. Inductive reasoning
         1. Patterns
         2. Sequences
    B. Deductive reasoning
         1. Logic
         2. Sets
 
Four additional topics chosen from II through VIII.
 
II. Number Theory
    A. Sets of numbers (e.g. prime, perfect, amicable, etc.)
    B. Numeration systems and number bases
    C. Additional topics may be chosen from identification numbers, encoding data,
         modular arithmetic, and cardinal numbers
III. Probability
    A. Counting techniques
    B. Rules of probability
    C. Conditional probability
    D. Probability models and simulations
IV. Statistics
    A. Frequency distributions
    B. Measures of central tendency and dispersion
    C. Graphical display of data
    D. Additional topics may be chosen from normal curve, estimation, and margin
          of error
V. Mathematical Modeling
    A. Linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic models
    B. Regression models
VI. Contemporary Applications - Types of Applications to be Chosen by Instructor, but Could
    Include One or More of the Following:
    A. Linear programming
    B. Matrices
    C. Financial mathematics
    D. Voting and apportionment
    E. Graph theory
VII. Geometry
    A. Areas and volumes
    B. Euclidean geometry and deductive systems
    C. Non-Euclidean geometry
    D. Additional topics may be chosen from conic sections, trigonometry, fractal
         geometry, polyhedra, symmetry and tesselations
VIII. History and Culture of Mathematics
    A. Overview of the historical development of mathematics
    B. Role of theorem and proof in mathematical thought
    C. Significant mathematical results and mathematicians

Assignments:
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1. Reading outside of class (approximately 20-50 pages per week)
2. Problem set assignments from required text(s) or supplementary materials chosen by the
    instructor (approximately 1-6 per week)
3. Quizzes (approximately 0-4 per week)
4. Exams (3-8)
5. Projects (for example computer explorations or modeling activities (0-10)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
5 - 25%
Problem sets, projects
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
75 - 95%
Exams and quizzes
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Thinking Mathematically. 6th ed. Blitzer, Robert. Pearson. 2014 (classic)
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey. 7th ed. Johnson, David and Mowry, Thomas. Cengage. 2012 (classic)

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