SRJC Course Outlines

4/14/2024 1:42:11 PMKINES 81 Course Outline as of Fall 2024

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  KINES 81Title:  INTRO TO EXERCISE PHYSIO  
Full Title:  Introduction to Exercise Physiology, Assessment, and Program
Last Reviewed:2/26/2024

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.5017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled43.75
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled1.505 min.Lab Scheduled26.25
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total4.00 Contact Total70.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  87.50Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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In this course the students will examine the human physiological responses and adaptations of exercise and physical training.  Course content is part of the national American Council on Exercise (ACE) certification program, this course along with Kines 80 and 83 will prepare students to take the ACE Personal Trainer and/or Group Fitness Certification exam.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 OR EMLS 100 (formerly ESL 100) or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
In this course the students will examine the human physiological responses and adaptations of exercise and physical training.  Course content is part of the national American Council on Exercise (ACE) certification program, this course along with Kines 80 and 83 will prepare students to take the ACE Personal Trainer and/or Group Fitness Certification exam.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 OR EMLS 100 (formerly ESL 100) or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2010Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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1. Identify and differentiate credible sources and concepts for interpreting scientific research.
2. Describe the principles of exercise training and adaptation on the skeletal muscles, nervous system, cardiorespiratory system, body composition, metabolism, environmental conditions, and fatigue and integrate them into a safe and effective training plan.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
1. Assess one's health by completing a physical activity readiness questionnaire (PARQ), medical/health history, and lifestyle questionnaire.
2. Demonstrate the ability to administer baseline fitness assessments in each component of fitness and interpret the results.
3. Identify strategies, barriers, and methods of goal setting and design written exercise programs for various case studies.
4. Describe the principles and variables of training for a successful annual training plan.
5. Relate general principles and adaptations of aerobic, anaerobic, and resistance training to exercise training regimens.
6. Comprehend the role of metabolism, bioenergetics, and energy expenditure in varying levels of exercise intensity and at rest.
7. Describe the structure and function of the nervous system as it relates to neural control of human movement.
8. Define body composition and its relationship to health, exercise and sport participation.
9. Identify the principles and physiological responses to various environmental conditions (i.e. higher altitude, heat, and cold).

Topics and Scope
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I. Resting Assessments and Anthropometric Measurements
    A. Sequencing assessments
         1. preparticipation screening
              a. physical activity readiness questionnaire
              b. health history
              c. medical clearance
         2. heart rate and blood pressure
         3. static posture and movement assessments
         4. flexibility
         5. cardiovascular fitness
         6. body composition and anthropometric measurements
              a. bioimpedence analysis
              b. hydrostatic weighing
              c. body mass index (BMI)
              d. skinfolds
              e. circumference
         7. muscular fitness
         8. skill-related fitness
II. Cardiorespiratory Training, Physiology, Assessment, and Programming
    A. Cardiovascular system - heart and vascular system
    B. Respiratory system
         1. oxygen carrying capacity
         2. oxygen delivery
         3. oxygen extraction
    C. Physiological adaptations to acute and chronic cardiovascular exercise
    D. Environmental considerations when exercising
         1. in the heat
         2. in the cold
         3. in high altitude
    E. General guidelines for cardiorespiratory exercise for health and fitness
         1. frequency, intensity, time and type principle (FITT)
         2. heart rate
         3. rate of perceived exertion (RPE)
         4. volume or amount of oxygen your body consumes (VO2)
         5.  caloric expenditure
         6. ventilatory threshold
         7. steady state and interval-based exercise
III. Components of a Cardiorespiratory Workout Session
    A. Warm-up
    B. Conditioning phase
    C. Cool-down
IV. American Council on Exercise Integrated Fitness Training Model- Cardiorespiratory Training
    A. Base training
    B. Fitness and performance training
    C. Program design
V. Foundations and Benefits of Muscular Training
    A. Anatomical system
         1. Muscular contraction
         2. Muscle-fiber type
         3. Muscle-fiber microanatomy
         4. Connective tissue
    B. Benefits of Muscular Training
         1. Physiological adaptations to muscular training
              a. acute
               b. long-term
         2. Factors that influence muscular strength and hypertrophy
         3. Muscular training principles
              a. progression
              b. specificity
              c. overload
              d. reversibility
              e. diminishing returns
              f. training frequency
              g. exercise selection and order
              h. training volume
              i. training intensity
              j. training tempo
              k. rest intervals
VI. Muscular Training Assssments
    A. Functional assessments
         1. load and speed
         2. power
         3. speed, agility and quickness
VII. Integrated Exercise Programming: From Evidence to Practice
    A. Evidence based practice - interpreting scientific research
    B. American Council on Exercise Integrated Fitness Training Model Cardiorespiratory Training Programming
    C. Base training
    D. Fitness training
    E. Performance training
VIII. American Council on Exercise Integrated Fitness Model Muscular Training Performance
    A. Functional training
    B. Movement training
    C. Load/speed training
    D. Periodization
    E. Program maintenance
    F. Recover
    G. Case studies
 
All topics are covered in the lecture and lab portions of the course.

Assignments:
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Lecture-Related Assignments:
1. Read an average of 20-30 pages per week of text and laboratory material
2. Development of individualized exercise programs
3. Research article summaries
4. Client project - Case studies assessment and program design written reports
5. Exercise goals and journal/log
6. Quizzes and exams
 
 
Lab-Related Assignments:
1. Perform  labs, assess and tabulate data collected
2. Attendance and participation
3. Field test administration

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 50%
Individualized Exercise Programs, Research Article Summaries, Exercise goals and journal/ log
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 25%
Field test administration, client projects, perform labs, assess and tabulate data collected
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 70%
Quizzes and exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 15%
Participation and Attendance


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Exercise Professional's Guide to Personal Training. American Council on Exercise. 2020
Instructor Prepared materials

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