SRJC Course Outlines

2/17/2020 2:43:30 AMINTDIS 1 Course Outline as of Spring 2011

Inactive Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  INTDIS 1Title:  CULTURE, TECHNOLOGY,ARTS  
Full Title:  Culture, Technology and the Arts
Last Reviewed:11/23/1998

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An interdisciplinary study of art, culture, and technology which interweaves humanities, social sciences, and science.  The course will focus on the global interconnections between the rise of technology since the 15th century and the changes that were brought about within cultural systems and in artistic production as a result.  The course will examine block prints, book production, novels, prints, map-making, weaving, engraving, etching, lithography, photography, film, video, and computer-generated art.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An interdisciplinary study of art, culture, and technology which interweaves humanities, social sciences and science.  The course will focus on the global interconnections between the rise of technology since the 15th century and the changes that were brought about within cultural systems and in artistic production as a result.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C2HumanitiesFall 1999Spring 2011
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3BHumanitiesFall 1999Spring 2011
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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By the end of this course, the student will be able to:
1.  Analyze the impact of changes in technology on cultural
systems and artistic production from the 15th century to
the present day.
2.  Relate works to a global and intercultural context.
3.  Participate in cultural activities relevant to the themes
of the class by attendance at museums, lectures, forums,
performances, films, poetry readings etc., as well as
scheduled field trips.
4.  Demonstrate in writing the ability to analyze, compare and
contrast, to weigh arguments, to examine values, and to
integrate materials from several disciplines.
5.  Demonstrate the ability to utilize appropriate technologies
including digital media, chat rooms, and the Internet.

Topics and Scope
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1. The course will examine the changes that were brought about
within cultural systems and artistic production as a result
of the rise of technology from the 15th century to the
present day. Cultural systems may include theology,
ideology, literary endeavors and the ideas of self.  Modes
of artistic production may include the traditional
categories of the visual arts, music, film, dance, and
literature as well as more contemporary modes such as
digital art, digital music, and video production.
2.  The course will interweave the humanities, the social
sciences, and science to focus on global interconnections.
3.  The course will include works of art which have been
impacted by technological change, including block prints,
books, cartography, engravings, etchings, weaving and
textiles, lithography, film, video, computer-generated and
digital images.  The course will also focus on new
technologies within the arts such as digital music, digital
images, and Internet art.
4.  The course will provide an historical overview of the
impact of technology on artistic and cultural production,
including (but not limited to) the following topics:
a)  Block prints
b)  Printing presses and books
c)  Literacy and the rise of the novel
d)  Cartography ( globalization, transculturation, and
   colonization)
e)  Weaving and textiles
f)  Engraving and etching
g)  Lithography (the beginning of affordable art for the
   public)
h) Photography
i)  Film (mass media requiring intensive capitalization)
j)  Video (performance and television)
k)  Computers and digital images (as they are employed using
   electronics and science, affecting music, art, and
   interpersonal relations, especially the World Wide Web
   and the Internet)
5.  The course will include instruction in the use of
technology to access images and information, including use
of digital media for research and investigation and on-line
instruction or chat rooms.

Assignments:
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1.  Careful reading and analysis of assigned primary texts,
including non-literary texts.
2.  Reading assignments to establish historical/cultural context or
to provide a theoretical framework.
3.  Examinations, including quizzes, mid-term, final, and/or take-
home exam.
4.  Written essays requiring the student to analyze representative
works.
5.  Written essays requiring the students to compare and contrast;
examine ideas, values, beliefs, and experiences; question
assumptions (their own and others); and integrate two or more
disciplines.
6.  Participation in cultural activities related to the class,
including museum visits, concerts, poetry readings, lectures,
and (optional) field trips.
7.  Creative projects (optional depending on instructor).
8.  Internet research and on-line assignments.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
50 - 80%
Written homework, Essay exams, Term papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 10%
Accessing Internet, completing on-line assignments
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
10 - 30%
Multiple choice, True/false, Matching items, Short essay
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 30%
Cultural activites, creative projects (optional) & field trip (optional)


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Plant, Sadie.  "Zeros and Ones" from THE MATRIX OF WOMEN AND
MACHINES.  Doubleday: 1997.
Conley, Tom.  THE EMPIRE OF MAPS.  Harvard University Press:
1997.
Meyer, Pedro.  TRUTH AND FICTION.  (Book and CD ROM art site).
Apeture Foundation, Inc.:  1995.
Benjamin, Walter.  "Art in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction"
from ILLUMINATIONS.  Schocken Books:  1985.
Eco, Umberto. TRAVELS IN HYPERREALITY.  Harcourt, Brace, and
Company:  1990.

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