SRJC Course Outlines

12/13/2019 10:14:21 PMHUMAN 8 Course Outline as of Fall 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  HUMAN 8Title:  COMPARATIVE MYTHOLOGY  
Full Title:  Comparative Mythology
Last Reviewed:10/8/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course investigates myths representing diverse global cultures; introduces scholarly theories and methods of interpretation; compares and contrasts plot structures, themes and character types within and across cultures; analyzes the creation of modern myths; and traces myth's relationship with language, history, politics, religion and the arts.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course investigates myths representing diverse global cultures; introduces scholarly theories and methods of interpretation; compares and contrasts plot structures, themes and character types within and across cultures; analyzes the creation of modern myths; and traces myth's relationship with language, history, politics, religion and the arts.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:E
Humanities
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C2HumanitiesFall 1987
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3BHumanitiesFall 1981
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Analyze and critique a myth for its ideological content and values.
2.  Trace and explicate the evolution of a myth in its permutations through time.
3.  Identify and critique the mythic elements in contemporary political and religious discourse.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.  Define "myth" and distinguish it from "fiction, "legend," and "folklore."
2.  Apply several different approaches to the study of myth.
3.  Compare and contrast the similarities and differences in myths of various cultural origins,
      including representative examples from at least three of the following cultural areas:  
      Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, Latin America and Pacific Islands.
4.  Identify and analyze patterns or themes reflected in myths, whatever their origins.
5.  Place the myth in cultural context and establish interconnections with other art forms
      and cultures.
6. Analyze different versions of a myth and explicate its evolutionary trajectory.
7. Explicate the relationship of myth and ritual.
8. Explicate how myth defines and understands humanity's relationship with the natural world.

Topics and Scope
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I.  Introduction to Various Approaches to the Study of Mythology
    A. Psychological or Jungian
    B. Cultural/historical
    C. Literary, including connections between myth, legend, folk tale
         and fairy tale
    D. Religious
II. Discussion and Analysis of Representative Myths and Mythic Themes from
    at least Three of the Following Cultural Areas, Within a Cultural Context:
    A. Europe
    B. Africa
    C. Asia
    D. North America
    E. Latin America
    F. Pacific Island and other island cultures
III. Exploration of Major Themes in Myth as Evidenced in Specific Myths,
    such as:
    A. Hero's journey
    B. Death, descent to underworld, rebirth
    C. Creation
     D. Tricksters
    E. Apocalyptic scenarios
    F. Sex and Gender
     G. Social Formation
    H. Ecology and sustainability
    I. Nature and Culture

Assignments:
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1. Weekly reading assignments of between 20-50 pages
2. Two to five essays (minimum 250 words)
3. Exams, essay and/or objective format (2 - 5)
4. Quizzes (2 - 7)
5. Research paper (minimum 1000 words)
6. Cumulative final project consisting of one or more of the following:
    objective exam, essay exam, portfolio, oral presentation
7. Optional creative projects such as interviews, performances, oral presentations, or field trips

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 50%
Essays
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 70%
Multiple choice, true/false, matching items, completion, essay exams, text analysis
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Interview, classroom participation, oral presentation, or field trip reports


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Introduction to Mythology: Contemporary Approaches to Classical and World Mythology. 4th ed. Thury, Eva M. and Devinney, Margaret K. Oxford University Press. 2016
 
The World of Myth: An Anthology. 2nd ed. Leeming, David. Oxford University Press. 2013 (classic)
 
Myths from Mesopotamia. Revised. Dalley, Stephanie (translator). Oxford University Press. 2009 (classic)
 
Popol Vuh: Sacred Book of the Maya: The Great Classic of Central American Sprituatlity. Christenson, Allen (translator). University of Oklahoma Press. 2007 (classic)
 
Homeric Hymns. Cashford, Jules (translator) and Richardson, Nicholas (editor, introduction). Penguin. 2003 (classic)
 
The Poetic Edda. Acker, Paul and Larrington, Carolyne (editors). Routledge. 2002 (classic)

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