SRJC Course Outlines

11/29/2020 3:17:05 AMHIST 30 Course Outline as of Fall 2018

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  HIST 30Title:  AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY  
Full Title:  African American History
Last Reviewed:2/26/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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A critical examination of African American history and historiography covering the colonial period through the opening of the 21st century.  We will trace the African American experience from its West African roots, through the trauma of the Atlantic slave trade, and the struggle of a people to create culture and community under the brutal conditions of American slavery.  Following an overview of the Civil War and Reconstruction, students will analyze the rise of "Jim Crow," black migration, and urbanization over the course to two world wars and the continuing influence of African Americans on the politics and culture of the United States.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A critical examination of African American history and historiography covering the colonial period through the opening of the 21st century.  We will trace the African American experience from its West African roots, through the trauma of the Atlantic slave trade, and the struggle of a people to create culture and community under the brutal conditions of American slavery.  Following an overview of the Civil War and Reconstruction, students will analyze the rise of "Jim Crow," black migration, and urbanization over the course to two world wars and the continuing influence of African Americans on the politics and culture of the United States.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
G
Social and Behavioral Sciences
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2011
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 D6History  
 DSocial ScienceFall 2000Summer 2011
 D6History  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981Summer 1995
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D4Gender Studies  
 D5Geography  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 2011
 4CEthnic Studies  
 4FHistory  
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceSpring 2000Summer 2011
 4FHistory  
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1992Fall 1995
 4FHistory  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.   Critically analyze key events and issues in the African American experience.
2.   Evaluate the critical role and lasting legacy of an African American presence
     on the economic, political, and/or cultural life of the United States.
3.   Analyze and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Describe historical methodology and demonstrate an analytical approach to interpreting
    the past.
2. Compare and contrast different historical interpretations to explain historical events and
     societal change over time.
3. Recognize the centrality of slavery and its eventual abolition to America's economic
     and political development through the 19th century.
4. Trace the African American struggle for equal rights and analyze its impact on American law
     and politics up to the present day.
5. Identify and explain the African American influence on American culture.
6. Trace the historical roots of racism and analyze the ongoing problems of racial and class
    conflict in contemporary American society.

Topics and Scope
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I. History as Social Science
    A. Understanding the present through analyzing the past
    B. Methods of inquiry, primary and secondary sources, analysis, and critical thinking
II.  African American Historiography: Black Americans and the Historians, 1880 - Present
III. African Roots of African American Culture
    A. Africa and the ancient world
    B. West African society and culture
    C. Early encounters with Europeans
IV. African Diaspora: Slavery and the Atlantic World
    A. Impact of the slave trade on Africa, Europe, and the Americas
    B. Slave societies of the Western Hemisphere: a comparative view
    C. Slavery in British colonial America
V.  Blacks and the American Revolution: Race, Slavery, and "Natural Rights" Philosophy
VI. Slavery and the "Cotton Kingdom"
    A. The "peculiar institution" and antebellum America
    B. Culture of resistance: "the world the slaves made"
VII.  North of Slavery: Free Blacks in Antebellum America
VIII. Slavery and a Nation Divided
    A. The abolitionist crusade
    B. Slavery, Manifest Destiny, and political realignments
    C. "Irrepressible Conflict": the road to civil war
IX. The Civil War: "Second American Revolution"
    A. From war for union to war for emancipation
    B. Blacks and the Union
    C. Blacks and the Confederacy
X. Reconstruction: "Failed Revolution"
    A. 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments
    B. Republicans - black and white
    C. Southern white resistance and the Compromise of 1877
XI. African Americans and the "New South"
    A. Contract labor, sharecropping, and the convict-lease system
    B. "Separate but equal": Plessy v. Ferguson, 1896
    C. Washington and Du Bois: accommodation vs. protest
XII. Race Relations and Imperial America
    A. "Exodusters," "Buffalo Soldiers," and the trans-Mississippi West
    B. Racial ideology and the Spanish American War
    C. White supremacy triumphant
XIII. World War I, the Great Migration, and the "New Negro"
    A. Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association
    B. Harlem Renaissance and the Jazz Age
    C. African Americans and the New Deal
XIV. World War II: Seeds of Revolution
    A. Phillip Randolph and the March on Washington Movement
    B. "Double 'V'": the fight at home and abroad
XV. The Civil Rights Movement
    A. Racial reform and Cold War politics
    B. Civil disobedience and the strategy of nonviolence
    C. Martin Luther King: from Montgomery to "I Have a Dream"
    D. Successes and failures: 1954 - 1965
XVI. Black Power and the Sixties
    A. Malcolm X and nascent black consciousness
    B. Black Panther Party and anti-capitalist critique
    C. Black Student Movement and Black Studies
    D. Rise of black elected officials
XVII. Johnson's Great Society and Conservative Reaction
    A. The Vietnam War and inner-city rebellions
     B. "White flight" and inner-city poverty
    C. Conservative challenge to New Deal/Great Society liberalism
    D. Progress and poverty at the end of the 20th century
XVIII. African Americans in the 21st Century
    A. Hip Hop Nation, black cultural expression, and the American mainstream
    B. Election of Barack Obama

Assignments:
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1. Reading 30 to 50 pages per week.  Assignments may consist of either primary or
     secondary sources
2. Out-of-class writing consisting of analytical essays, response or research papers,
    film or book reviews (1500 to 3000 words)
3. One midterm and one final exam, both primarily essay, but may include multiple choice or
     short answer questions
4. Class participation which may include small group work, extemporaneous question
     and answer, or oral presentations

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
25 - 50%
Written homework, analytical essays, reaction or research papers, film or book reviews
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
50 - 75%
Essay, multiple choice, and other forms of formal testing
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 25%
Participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Douglass, Frederick. Bedford Books. 2017
 
African Americans: A Concise History. 5th ed. Hine, Darlene and Hine, William and Harrold, Stanley.  Pearson. 2013 (classic)
 
Race, Reform, and Rebellion: The Second Reconstruction and Beyond in Black America, 1945 - 2006. 3rd ed.  Marable, Manning.  University Press of Mississippi. 2007 (classic)
 
In Search of the Promised Land: A Slave Family in the Old South.  Franklin, John and Schweninger, Loren.  Oxford University Press. 2006 (classic)

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