SRJC Course Outlines

9/28/2020 9:07:03 PMGEOG 7 Course Outline as of Fall 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  GEOG 7Title:  HUMAN GEOGRAPHY  
Full Title:  Introduction to Human Geography
Last Reviewed:12/10/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Human geography is the study of the world, its people, communities, and cultures. Includes human population, ethnicity, culture, agriculture, development and settlement patterns, and social, political and economic systems. Emphasis is placed on spatial patterns and the interactions between humans and the physical environment.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Human geography is the study of the world, its people, communities, and cultures. Includes human population, ethnicity, culture, agriculture, development and settlement patterns, and social, political and economic systems. Emphasis is placed on spatial patterns and the interactions between humans and the physical environment.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Spring 1982
Inactive: 
 Area:D
Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2012
 D5Geography  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1991Summer 2012
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 D5Geography  
 D6History  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981Summer 1991
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 D6History  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981
 4EGeography  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Spring 1982Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Spring 1982Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: GEOG 120 Introduction to Human Geography SRJC Equivalent Course(s): GEOG7

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Apply geographic methods and tools to observe and understand the distribution of human
    cultural characteristics at the local, regional, and global scale.
2.  Synthesize information interpreted from maps and statistical data in order to recognize
    patterns and interpret spatial relationships between human activity and the natural
    environment.
3.  Describe how human actions modify the physical environment and how the physical
    environment affects humans.

Objectives: Untitled document
During this course, students will:
1. Recognize and identify relationships between human geography and other disciplines.
2. Compare and contrast models, hierarchies, and classification schemes and apply them to
    geographic issues.  
3. Compare and contrast fundamental social science concepts such as cultural traits, cultural
    evolution, diffusion, determinism, free will, and ethnocentrism.   
4. Use, analyze and interpret maps and other geographic data.  
5. Examine relationships between birth, death, and migration statistics and calculate and interpret
    population sizes and growth rates.
6. Explain the origins, characteristic, processes, and distribution of the world's major economic
    and political systems, and culture areas.  
7. Identify fundamental commonalities of human experience in diverse environments, and the
    role of tradition, gender, education, technology and globalization in human response to
    environmental change.

Topics and Scope
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Topics will include, but are not be limited to:  
  
I. Core Geographic Concepts
     A. Social science methods
    B. Location and place
    C. Regions
    D. Scale: local, regional and global patterns
     E. Space: distribution of features
    F. Connections between places
     G. Maps, map reading, and other geographical tools
II. Population
     A. Demographic indicators
    B. Demographic transition
    C. Population pyramids
    D. Distribution
    E. Density
    F. Controls
III. Migration
    A. Patterns
    B. Types
    C. Controls
IV. Ethnicity
    A. Race vs. ethnicity
    B. Ethnic diversity
    C. Distribution
     D. Conflicts
     E. Impacts on the landscape
V. Language
    A. Origin and diffusion
    B. Classification
    C. Distribution
    D. Modifications
VI. Religion
    A. Classification
    B. Origin and diffusion
     C. Major world religions
    D. Global distribution
VII. Folk and Popular Culture
    A. Origin and diffusion
     B. Influence of the physical environment
    C. Material culture
    D. Impact of globalization
    E. Environmental impacts
VIII. Political Geography
    A. States, nations and nation-states
    B. Evolution of the modern state
    C. Shapes, boundaries, and locations
    D. Distribution
     E. Cooperation among states
     F. Terrorism
IX. Urban Patterns
    A. Urbanization
    B. Origins of cities
    C. Functions
    D. Structure
    E. Global distribution
     F. Changes
X. Agriculture
    A. Origin and diffusion
    B. Classification and forms
    C. Distribution
XI. Development
    A. Economic, social and demographic indicators
    B. Distribution
XII. Resource Extraction
    A. Fishing
    B. Forestry
    C. Mining and quarrying
XIII. Manufacturing and Industry
     A. Origins
    B. Location considerations
    C. Patterns and trends
    D. Associated problems
    E. Global distribution
XIV. Services
    A. Types
     B. Hierarchy
     C. Distribution patterns      
XV. Human Impacts on the Natural Environment
     A. Renewable and non-renewable resources
     B. Resource depletion
     C. Pollution

Assignments:
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1. Assigned readings (20-40 pages per week)
2. Assignments (6-16): written homework; homework problems; problem solving exercises;
    mapping assignments
3. Quizzes (4-12)  
4. Written papers (3-8, 1-2 pages each) and/or research paper (0-1, 4-8 pages)
5. Exams (3-5)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
15 - 40%
Written homework, written papers and/or research paper
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
15 - 40%
Problem solving exercises, homework problems, mapping assignments
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 70%
Quizzes, objective exams (multiple choice, etc.) that include short answer and essay questions
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Participation and attendance


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Cultural Landscape: An Introduction to Human Geography. 12th ed.  Rubenstein, James. Pearson. 2017
 
Human Geography: Places and Regions in Global Context. 7th ed. Knox, Paul and Marston, Sallie.  Pearson. 2016
 
Human Geography: People, Place, and Culture. 11th ed. Fouberg, Erin and Murphy, Alexander and de Blij, Harm. John Wiley & Sons. 2015

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