SRJC Course Outlines

12/8/2021 5:43:08 AMFDNT 75 Course Outline as of Fall 2020

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  FDNT 75Title:  PRINCIPLES OF FOOD  
Full Title:  Principles of Food
Last Reviewed:2/10/2020

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled3.006 min.Lab Scheduled52.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
Introduction to food science principles including whole food preparation techniques for healthy food production. Emphasis on food sanitation and safety, nutrition, sensory evaluation, food standards and quality, ingredients and their functions and interactions.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Introduction to food science principles including whole food preparation techniques for healthy food production. Emphasis on food sanitation and safety, nutrition, sensory evaluation, food standards and quality, ingredients and their functions and interactions.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2007Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
Untitled document
1.  Plan high quality nutrient dense menus using a variety of whole foods.
2.  Use appropriate safety and sanitation procedures in food preparation.
3.  Prepare and present a variety of nutritious high quality meals made with whole food ingredients.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Students will be able to:
1.   Describe and follow proper safety procedures in the kitchen.
2.   Identify the main types of food borne hazards and follow appropriate sanitary food receiving,
      storage, and production procedures in meal preparation.
3.   Demonstrate basic knowledge of weights, measures and conversions.
4.   Select, use and maintain kitchen equipment and utensils appropriately.
5.   Describe uses of a variety of equipment used in institutional cooking.
6.   Demonstrate proper cleaning and sanitizing techniques for various equipment, and maintain
      a clean, organized work area in the kitchen.
7.   Identify the composition of food products.
8.   Demonstrate basic knowledge of food preparation terminology and techniques.
9.   Understand and apply basic scientific principles in the preparation and storage of food to
      ensure safe, high quality products.
10. Produce acceptable food products using standardized recipes and scale recipes up or down
      from the originals as needed.
11. Safely evaluate sensory attributes of food.
12. Prepare and present a variety of high quality food products made with nutrient dense food
      products, demonstrating knowledge of basic methods, ingredients, and nutritional value of
      whole foods.
13. Plan menus using a variety of whole foods that maintain high levels of flavor, color and
      nutrient value.
14. Prepare a variety of nutritious baked goods, including ones with reduced fat and sugar levels.
15. Compare the effects of food preparation methods on the nutritive value of foods.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
I. Introduction to Food Production
    A. Safety and Sanitation
         1. Kitchen attire
         2. Hand washing
         3. Cleaning and sanitizing equipment, utensils, and work surfaces
         4. Safe food sampling
         5. Food storage
    B. Kitchen Equipment and Terminology; Use of Standardized Recipes
         1. Identification and appropriate use of standard kitchen equipment.
         2. Writing and using standardized recipes
         3. Weighing and measuring ingredients, including dry vs. wet
              ingredients; equivalencies; conversions; yields
    C. Introduction to Knife Skills
         1. Types and uses of different knives
         2. Knife sharpening, cleaning and storing
         3. Slicing, dicing, and chopping
    D. Introduction to Sensory Evaluation Techniques
         1. Aroma
         2. Taste
         3. Mouth feel
         4. Influence of environment on perceptions: light, noise
    E. Introduction to Components of Foods, Basic Cooking Methods and
         Nutrient Retention
         1. Roasting/grilling
         2. Braising/poaching
         3. Sautéing
         4. Steaming
         5. Stir frying
         6. Use of microwave
    F. Introduction to Basic Stocks, Soups, Sauces
         1. Ingredients
         2. Preparation techniques
    G. Menu Planning and Presentation
         1. Introduction to basic nutrition and nutritional concerns
         2. Textures, colors, flavors
         3. Seasonality
II. Plant Foods: Vegetables, Fruits, Grains and Legumes
    A. Vegetables and Fruits
         1. Food composition and effect of processing
         2. Nutritional value
         3. Role in planning nutritious menus
         4. Standards and selection considerations
         5. Safety and sanitation concerns; selection and storage
    B. Types of Vegetables and Fruits
         1. Roots
         2. Greens
         3. Fruits
         4. Seasonality of fruits and vegetables
         5. Use in salads, including green, fruit and mixed
    C. Vegetable and Fruit Cooking Methods and Food Science Principles;
         Nutrient Retention
         1. Caramelization
         2. Baking and roasting
         3. Steaming
         4. Blanching
         5. Sautéing
         6. Stir frying
         7. Use of oils; smoke points; flavor; nutrition
         8. Soups, stocks
    D. Vegetable and Fruit Uses
         1. Sauces
         2. Maintaining color; batch cooking
         3. Selection and storage; choice of fresh vs. frozen vs. canned
         4. Texture modified diets; pureed
    E. Grains
         1. Types of whole grains and grain products
         2. Food composition and the effect of processing
         3. Nutritive value
         4. Role in planning nutritious menus
         5. Safety and sanitation concerns; selection and storage
    F. Cooking Methods and Food Science Principles of Primarily Whole Grains
         1. Basic techniques, including steaming and pilafs
         2. Considerations for retaining nutrient content
         3. Problem solving: avoiding lumps, stickiness, sogginess
         4. Appropriate use in texture modified diets; pureed
III. Animal Products: Meat, Poultry, Seafood, Dairy and Eggs
    A. Meats, Poultry and Seafood Basics:
         1. Food composition and food science principles
         2. Nutritive value
         3. Role in menu planning
         4. Safety and sanitation concerns; selection and storage
         5. Production, seasonality and sustainability issues
    B. Meats, Poultry and Seafood Preparation
          1. Identifying different cuts and appropriate uses including cost considerations
         2. Use of pre-cooking techniques for improving flavor and texture
         3. Cooking methods and nutrient retention
              i.   braising, poaching
              ii.  breading/baking (vs. frying)
              iii. roasting/grilling
         4. Texture modified diets; pureed
    C. Egg and Dairy Basics
         1. Food composition and food science principles
         2. Nutritive value
         3. Role in menu planning
         4. Safety and sanitation concerns; selection and storage
         5. Production and sustainability issues
    D. Egg and Dairy Preparation
         1. Choosing types, including different grades of eggs and milk
              alternatives based on intended use, budget, and nutritional concerns
         2. Cheese making and food science principles
         3. Cooking methods and nutrient retention
         4. Texture modified diets; pureed
IV. Baked Goods
    A. Ingredients, Ingredient Interactions and Food Science Principles
         1. Use of fat, sugar, or fat/sugar substitutes, including effect on flavor, and texture.
          2. Nutritive value
         3. Role in menu planning
         4. Safety and sanitation concerns; selection and storage
    B. Chemically Leavened Products
         1. Types of chemical leaveners
         2. Effect on different flours on texture and taste
         3. Preparation of products using standard techniques
              i.    biscuits/scones
              ii.   cookies
              iii.  cakes
              iv. quick breads
     C. Yeast Leavened Products
         1. Role and requirements of yeast for proper flavor and texture
         2. Effect of different flours on texture and taste
          3. Preparation of products using standard techniques
    D. Pastry
         1. Role of fat or fat substitutes in development of flavor and texture
         2. Effect on different flours on texture and taste
         3. Preparation of products using standard techniques
    E. Use of Fruits in Baked Goods
         1. Variety
         2. Selection
         3. Storage

Assignments:
Untitled document
1. Weekly preparation of foods from raw materials, including scaling recipes and maintaining
    clean work areas
2. Quizzes (weekly)
3. Menu development project and final food presentation at end of the semester
4. Maintenance of notebook to include terminology, flavor charts, conversion charts and recipes
5. Text reading of approximately 20-40 pages per week

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments and skill demonstrations are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 20%
Menu development project, scaling recipes
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
50 - 60%
Preparation of food, maintaining clean work areas; food presentation
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
10 - 20%
Weekly quizzes
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Notebook. Participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
Untitled document
Introductory Foods. 15th ed. Schuele, Barbara and Frye, Amanda. Pearson. 2020

Print PDF