SRJC Course Outlines

8/9/2022 1:36:11 AMFDNT 63 Course Outline as of Fall 2016

Inactive Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  FDNT 63Title:  DIMENSIONS OF NUTRITION  
Full Title:  Dimensions of Nutrition
Last Reviewed:3/29/2010

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum2.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum2.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total2.00 Contact Total35.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 105.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Nutrition for food service. Basic nutrient use in the body. Strategies for maximizing nutrient value of food for optimal health and lower risk of disease. Translating medical advice into menu planning and food preparation.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100 and Eligibility for MATH 150A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Nutrition for food service. Basic nutrient use in the body. Strategies for maximizing nutrient value of food for optimal health and lower risk of disease. Translating medical advice into menu planning and food preparation.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100 and Eligibility for MATH 150A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon completion of the course the student will be able to:
1.   Describe food guides and their relationship to lowered risk of chronic diseases.
2.   Discuss factors affecting food choices including flavor and culture.
3.   List the basic nutrients and describe the biochemical functions of each related to well-being.
4.   Describe changing nutrition needs for different stages of the life cycle.
5.   Describe the clinical application of basic nutrition for selected disease states.
6.   Discuss the significance of specific lab findings relevant for nutrition-related diseases.
7.   Discuss drug-nutrient interactions and their effect on client nutrition.
8.   Create menu plans for normal and therapeutic diets with regard for the client's emotional and physical needs.
9.   Identify the various cultural diet plans possible with regard for provision of adequate nutrition.
10. Identify food selection and handling techniques that help ensure maximum nutritional value of the food.
11. Recognize the extent of personal responsibility to self and client in choosing good nutrition for health.

Topics and Scope
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1.  Nutrition concepts related to health and well-being
     a.  basic nutrients
     b.  fact versus myth in nutrition
     c.  factors affecting food choices
2.  Role of health professionals, care givers, and client in nutrition support
3.  Functions of nutrients
     a.  biochemistry of digestion, absorption, transport
     b.  metabolism and energy cycle
     c.  functions of vitamins, minerals and water
     d.  nutrient recommendations
     e.  U.S. dietary guidelines and diet planning tools
     f.   the value of food - flavor, family, familiarity
     g.  food habits and choices and relationship to health
     h.  drug-nutrient interactions
4.  Nutrition and the life cycle
     a.  nutrition for pregnancy, infancy and young children
     b.  food and nutrition in schools and social settings for older children
     c.  anorexia nervosa and bulimia
     d.  nutrition for athletes and lifelong fitness
     e.  nutrition for the elderly
5.  Introduction to diet therapy for various diseases, including evaluation of lab findings
     a.  diabetes
     b.  cardiovascular disease and hypertension
     c.  cancer
     d.  altered calorie needs - underweight and overweight
6.  Menu planning, food selection and preparation
     a.  nutrient dense food selections
     b.  lowering fat and increasing fiber and phytochemicals
     c.  use of herbs and spices
     d.  vegetarian diets
     e.  cooking to preserve nutrients
     f.   packaged foods; food labels
     g.  food safety and food technology
     h.  cultural, religious or other influences on planning and preparing a nutritious menu

Assignments:
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1.  Nutrient self-study by two methods; evaluation of findings
2.  Case studies
3.  Two exams and a final
4.  Reading text assignments (10 to 15 pages per week)
5.  Food label analysis
6.  Menu evaluation

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 20%
Diet analysis evaluation
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
20 - 40%
Label analysis, menu evaluation, case studies
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Exams: multiple choice, true/false, matching items, completion, short answer
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Personal Nutrition, Marie Boyle, 4th edition, 2008.

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