SRJC Course Outlines

9/24/2021 11:24:09 PMFASH 116.1 Course Outline as of Fall 2014

Inactive Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  FASH 116.1Title:  SERGER UPDATE  
Full Title:  Serger Update
Last Reviewed:9/19/2011

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum1.50Lecture Scheduled1.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled17.50
Minimum1.50Lab Scheduled2.006 min.Lab Scheduled35.00
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  35.00Total Student Learning Hours: 87.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  FASH 72B

Catalog Description:
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Advanced serging techniques applied to home decorating and garment construction. Emphasis on building speed and creatively expanding the use of the serger. Students must provide their own sergers.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of FASH 116 ( or FASH 72A or CLTX 72A)


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Advanced serging techniques applied to home decorating and garment construction. Emphasis on building speed and creatively expanding the use of the serger. Students must provide their own sergers.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of FASH 116 ( or FASH 72A or CLTX 72A)
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.  Identify areas of the garment and home furnishing items that effectively relate to the use of a serger in construction.
2.  Demonstrate increased speed in garment construction using the serger.
3.  Identify and apply the decorative serger threads and yarns appropriate for a variety of wearable and non-wearable projects.
4.  Use advanced serger techniques to construct garments and items for the home.
5.  Based on subsequent repeats, students will be able to apply techniques to:
       a. increasingly complex applications
       b. increasingly complex patterns
       c. fabric manipulation with a variety of fabric textures
       d. increasingly complex fitting issues and adjustments
       e. gain confidence and speed

Topics and Scope
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I.  Using the serger versus the sewing machine
     A. Location:
          1.  Necklines and collars
          2.  Seams
          3.  Sleeves
          4.  Decorative surface areas
          5.  Hems
     B. Managing the order of construction for the basic knit garment
     C. Building speed in construction.
II.  Decorative threads and yarns for wearable projects and
   non-wearable projects and their uses
          A.  Regular thread
          B.  Nylon filament thread
          C.  Topstitching thread
          D.  Rayon thread
          E.  Silk thread
          F.  Woolly thread
          G.  Metallic thread
          H.  Pearl cotton
          I.  Yarn
          J. Ribbon
          K. Decorative thread
          L. Yarn and ribbon guide
          M. Fusible thread
III.  Advanced techniques using the serger
     A. Blanket stitch
     B. Sweater knit:
          1.  Fabric selection for use of serger
          2.  Cutting techniques
          3.  Sweater knit seams
          4.  Stabilizing sweater knit edges for serging
          5.  Various sweater designs
          6.  Differential feed application on a sweater, knit, lingerie
     C. Heirloom sewing:
          1.  Pattern selection
          2.  Fabric selection
          3.  Threads
          4.  Trims, laces, ribbons
                a. Entredeaux
                b. Beading
                c. Lace insertion
                d. Lace edging
                e. Untrimmed eyelet
                f. Fabric puffing
          5.  Estimating amounts of items listed above
          6.  Appropriate stitches
                a. Rolled edge, 2 or 3 thread
                b. Flatlocking
                c. Chainstitch
                d. Regular serged seam
                e. Decorative stitches on conventional machines
     D. Lingerie:
          1.  Fabric selection
          2.  Threads
          3.  Appropriate stitches
                a. Standard narrow serged seam
                b. Seam without bulk - flatlock
                c. Seam locking
                d. French seam
          4.  Application of laces and trims:
                a. Standard serger method
                b. Flatlock
          5.  Application of elastic
          6.  Lingerie straps
          7.  Differential feed application on lingerie
          8.  Sequence of construction steps
     E. Additional techniques using the serger:
          1.  Making braid using the serger
          2.  Exposed zipper application
          3.  Decorative facings applications
          4.  Serger twists
          5.  Tuck and roll edge
          6.  Serger cording application
          7.  Patchwork flatlock
          8.  Faux lock (framed stitch)
IV.  Small home furnishing projects using the serger:
     A. Napkins:
          1.  Rolled hem edge
          2.  Flatlock and fringe
     B. Placemats and table runners:
          1.  Estimating yardage
          2.  Types of batting for filling
          3.  Thread types
     C. Pillows:
          1.  Forms
          2.  Variety of edges
                a. Tie
                b. Ruffles
                c. Flatlock fringe
                d. Quilts and crafts
     D. Other:
          1. Casserole carriers
          2. Computer or appliance covers
          3. Pillow cases
V.  Based on subsequent repeats, course will include techniques for:
       a. increasingly complex applications
       b. increasingly complex patterns
       c. fabric manipulation with a variety of fabric textures
       d. increasingly complex fitting issues and adjustments
       e. gain confidence and speed

Assignments:
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1. Construction of three garments:
    a. One garment using rolled edge
    b. One garment using flatlock stitch
    c. One garment of student's choice to be different from others
2. Construction of one item for the home
3. Reading from text approximately 10 - 20 pages per week
4. Based on subsequent repeats, students will apply techniques to:
       a. increasingly complex applications
       b. increasingly complex patterns
       c. fabric manipulation with a variety of fabric textures
       d. increasingly complex fitting issues and adjustments
       e. gain confidence and speed

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because skill demonstrations are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
60 - 95%
Construction of samples and garments
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 40%
Attendance and participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Creative Serging: The Complete Handbook for Decorative Overlock Sewing/Book 2. Patti Palmer, Gail Brown, and Sue Green. Palmer Pletsch Pub., 2005. (Classic)

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