SRJC Course Outlines

9/25/2022 3:25:08 AMETHST 77 Course Outline as of Fall 2022

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ETHST 77Title:  INTRO TO ETHNIC STUDIES  
Full Title:  Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Last Reviewed:10/25/2021

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course is an introduction to Ethnic Studies. The students will examine the cultural, economic, legal and environmental conditions under which different ethnic groups have made a home in America. The term "ethnic" is reframed to explicitly include white colonists and settlers in order to examine the legacy of colonialism, economic oppression and white supremacy against Indigenous peoples, non-white settlers, immigrants and refugees. Students will study key figures, moments and movements in multi-ethnic conflict; cooperation and solidarity are examined to illustrate the strength and influence of the people, old and new, who made, and are remaking America.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course is an introduction to Ethnic Studies. The students will examine the cultural, economic, legal and environmental conditions under which different ethnic groups have made a home in America. The term "ethnic" is reframed to explicitly include white colonists and settlers in order to examine the legacy of colonialism, economic oppression and white supremacy against Indigenous peoples, non-white settlers, immigrants and refugees. Students will study key figures, moments and movements in multi-ethnic conflict; cooperation and solidarity are examined to illustrate the strength and influence of the people, old and new, who made, and are remaking America.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2022
Inactive: 
 Area:G
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 FEthnic StudiesFall 2022
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2022Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2022Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1. Understand the process of ethnicization in the United States.
2. Describe the cultural conditions under which ethnic groups have made a home in the United States.
3. Identify key groups, events and figures in multi-ethnic conflict, cooperation and solidarity in the United States.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
In order to achieve these learning outcomes, during the course students will:
1. Explain the process of ethnicization or becoming ethnic in the United States.
2. Broaden the meaning of "ethnic" to include white people in order to understand how ethnicization and white supremacy operates.
3. Discuss key figures, moments, and events in multiracial engagement.
4. Understand the development or success of different ethnic groups in the United States within the context of white supremacy, racial violence, and structural inequities.
5. Explore strategies for multiracial coalition building and solidarity through an intersectional lens.
 
Ethnic Studies Objectives:
1. Analyze and articulate concepts such as race and racism, racialization, ethnicity, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization, sovereignty, imperialism, settler colonialism, and anti-racism as analyzed in any one or more of the following: Native American Studies, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, and Latina and Latino American Studies. 
2. Apply theory and knowledge produced by Native American, African American, Asian American, and/or Latina and Latino American communities to describe the critical events, histories, cultures, intellectual traditions, contributions, lived-experiences and social struggles of those groups with a particular emphasis on agency and group-affirmation. 
3. Critically analyze the intersection of race and racism as they relate to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, language, and/or age in Native American, African American, Asian American, and/or Latina and Latino American communities. 
4. Critically review how struggle, resistance, racial and social justice, solidarity, and liberation, as experienced and enacted by Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans and/or Latina and Latino Americans are relevant to current and structural issues such as communal, national, international, and transnational politics as, for example, in immigration, reparations, settler-colonialism, multiculturalism, language policies. 
5. Describe and actively engage with anti-racist and anti-colonial issues and the practices and movements in Native American, African American, Asian American and/or Latina and Latino communities to build a just and equitable society.

Topics and Scope
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I. Racial Violence
     A. U.S. Imperialism in the 20th Century
          1. U.S. imperialism overseas from the Philippines to Haiti to Latin America
    B. Settler-violence and roots of domestic terrorism
     C. America as safe haven, asylum and sanctuary
     D. Puritans and religious fundamentalism
     E. Native genocide
     F. The War on Terror, Civil Liberties and "American Orientalism"
II. Race and Ethnicity in the United States
      A. Black, White, and "Other"
         1. Race in the United States in terms of black and white
        2. Addressing binaries
        3. Addressing "whiteness" as an ethnicity
        4. Reframing ethnicity
    B. "Other" Legal Racial Categories
          1. "Native"
         2. "Alien"
          3. "Refugee"
         4. "Immigrant"
         5. "Citizen"
III. Activism and Organizing
     A. "Queerness", race, and intersectionality
     B. Ethnic Movements in the U.S.
          1. American Indian Movement, concepts of "indigineity"
          2. Black Power, black trans activism
          3. El Movimiento, "latinidad"
          4. Yellow Power "perpetual foreigners", "model minority"
     C. Multi-Ethnic Organizing and Solidarity
          1. #StopAsianHate
          2. United Farmworkers
          3. Black Lives Matter
         4. Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women
    D. Reframing Ethnicity and Whiteness          
IV: Cultural Contexts
     A. The normalization of white supremacy
     B. "Driving while black" or modes of existence in a white supremacist society
    C. The "culture wars" and the "end of the American Mind"
     D. The Race for DEI (Diversity, Equity and Inclusion)
    E. Names, places, statues and the politics of cultural memory
V: Ethnicity and Environment
     A. Centers of migration, settlement and creation for ethnic groups in the United States
          1. Urban/rural/suburban
     B. Borderlands
          1. Racial difference between the northern and southern border
     C. Places of Employment
          1. The demographic make-up of "blue" vs. "white" collar jobs
          2. Garment workers, sweatshops and the meaning of "Made in the USA"
     D. Internment camps, reservations, ghettos
     E. Place of worship
    F. Ports of entries: Ellis Island, Angel Island, la frontera
     G. Gated communities
     H. Heritage districts
     I. Sanctuary states
     J. Infrastructure and environmental racism
VI. Science, Culture, and Ethnicity
     A. "Who Do You Think You Are?": Blood and ancestry and DIY genetics kits
     B.  Intelligence and Ethics
     C. Education and who's a "minority", bias and "affirmative action" in education
     D. Public health and the social safety net
    E.  Traditional Indigenous Knowledge

Assignments:
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1. Reading and written analysis of assigned primary texts (30-50 pgs. per week).
 
2. Examinations, such as quizzes, mid-term, final, and/or take-home exam.
 
3. 3-5 written essays (each essay is 500 words) requiring students to analyze representative works.
 
4. Optional participation in cultural activities, including museum visits, concerts, poetry readings, lectures, and field trips
 
5. Optional creative projects (e.g. debates, visual journals).
 
6. Written homework.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
50 - 90%
Written homework and/or essays
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
10 - 30%
Exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 30%
Field trips, activities, creative projects (debates. visual journals)


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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A War for the Soul of America, Second Edition A History of the Culture Wars. Hartman, Andrew. University of Chicago Press. 2019
 
Against White Feminism: Notes on Disruption. Zakaria, Rafia. W.W. Norton & Company. 2021
 
Asian Americans Dreams: The Emergence of an American People. Zia, Helen. Simon & Schuster. 2016 (Classic)
 
Black Power, Yellow Power,and the Making of Revolutionary Identities. Watkins, Rychetta. University Press of Mississippi. 2012 (Classic)
 
Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Anzaldua, Gloria et al. Aunt Lute Books. (Classic)
 
Boyle Heights: How a Los Angeles Neighborhood Became the Future of American Democracy. Sanchez, George. University of California Press. 2021
 
Building Character: The Racial Politics of Modern Architectural Style. Davis, Charles L. University of Pittsburgh Press. 2021
 
Intimacies of Violence in the Settler Colony: Economies of Dispossession around the Pacific Rim. Edmonds, Penelope and Amanda Nettleback. Palgrave Macmillan. 2018
 
Ethnic Studies: Issues and Approaches. Yang, Philip O. SUNY Press. 2000 (Classic)
 
A Field Guide to White Supremacy. Belew, Kathleen and Guiterrez, Ramon. University of California Press. 2021
 
Civil Rights in America: A History. Schmidt, Christopher W. Cambridge University Press. 2020
 
Colored Property: State Policy and White Racial Politics in Suburban America. Freund, David M. P. University of Chicago Press. 2010 (Classic)
 
Crying in H Mart: A Memoir. Zauner, Michelle. Knopf. 2021
 
Cultural Memory and Biodiversity. Nazarea, Virginia D. University of Arizona Press. 2006
 
Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America. Frey, William H. Brookings Institution Press. 2018
 
Dealing in Desire: Asian Ascendancy, Western Decline, and the Hidden Currencies of Global Sex Work. Hoang, Kathleen Kay. University of California Press. 2015 (Classic)
 
Different History: A History of Multicultural America. Takaki, Ronald. Back Bay Books: 2008 (Classic)
 
Envisioning Religion, Race and Asian Americans. Yoo, David K. and Joshi, Khyati Y. University of Hawaii, 2021
 
Ethnic Studies: Critical Fundamentals. Messer-Kruse, Tim. Achromous Books. 2018
 
Forced to Care: Coercion and Caregiving in America. Nakano Glenn, Evelyn. Harvard University Press. 2012 (Classic)
 
Forever Suspect: Racialized Surveillance of Muslim Americans in the War on Terror. Selod, Sehor. Rutgers University Press. 2018
 
Golden Children: Legacy of Ethnic Studies, SF State: A Memoir. Tamayo-Lott, Juanita. Eastwind Books of Berkeley. 2018
 
Hip-Hop Architecture. Cooke, Sekou. Bloomsbury Visual Arts. 2021
 
Holding Up More Than Half the Sky: Chinese Women Garment Workers in New York City, 1948-1992. Bao, Xiaolan. University of Illinois Press. 2006 (Classic)
 
Homegrown Hate: Why White Nationalists and Militant Islamists are Waging War Against the United States. Kamali, Sara. University of California Press. 2021
 
How to Make Love to a Negro. Lafferiere, Danny. Douglas McIntyre. 1987 (Classic)
 
Imagining LatinX Intimacies: Connecting Queer Stories, Spaces and Sexualities. Chamberlain, Edward A. Rowman & Littlefield. 2020
 
Invested Indifferences: How Violence Persists in Settler Colonial Society. Granznow, Kara. University of British Columbia Press. 2020
 
Jasmine. Mukherjee, Bharati. Grove Press. 1999 (Classic)
 
Knowledge for Justice: An Ethnic Studies Reader. Woo, David and Yoo, David K. 2021. UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center.
 
Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches. Crossing Press. 2007 (Classic)
 
Manifest Technique: Hip Hop, Empire, and Visionary Filipino American Culture. Rutgers University Press. Villegas, Mark. 2021
 
Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning. Park Hong, Cathy. Random House. 2021
 
Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America. Lippard, Lucy. Pantheon. 1990 (Classic)
 
Mothering through Precarity: Women's Work and Digital Media. Wilson, Julie. A. and Chivers Yochim, Emily. Duke University Press. 2017
 
Only What We Could Carry: The Japanese American Internment Experience. Fusao Inada, Lawson and Patricia Waikida and William Hohri. Heyday. 2014 (Classic)
 
Resistance: Challenging America's Wartime Internment of Japanese-Americans. The Epistolarian. 2001 (Classic)
 
Shades of Difference. Nakano Glenn, Evelyn. Stanford University Press. 2013 (Classic)
 
Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas. Ostler. Jeffrey. Yale University Press. 2020
 
The American Indian Rights Movement. Braun, Eric. Lerner Publications. 2018
 
The Black Skyscraper: Architecture and the Perception of Space. Johns Hopkins University Press. 2019
 
The Making of Asian America. Lee, Erika. Simon & Schuster. 2021 (Classic)
 
The Mechanisms of Racialization Beyond the Black/White Binary. Gonzales-Sobrino, Bianca and Gross, Devon R. Routledge. 2019
 
We Are Still Here: A Photographic History of the American Indian Movement. Bancroft, Dick et al. Borealis Books. 2013 (Classic)
 
We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation. Chang, Jeff. Picador. 2016 (Classic)
 
Westward Bound: Sex, Violence, the Law and the Making of a Settler Society. Erikson, Lesley. University of British Columbia Press. 2011 (Classic)
 
Whiter: Asian American Women on Skin Color and Colorism. Khanna, Nikki. NYU Press. 2020

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