SRJC Course Outlines

9/25/2022 3:46:39 AMETHST 74 Course Outline as of Fall 2022

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ETHST 74Title:  AMERICAN INDIANS TODAY  
Full Title:  American Indians Today
Last Reviewed:10/11/2021

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Students will study the development of a greater sensitivity to the American Indian through analysis of ethnocentrism, racialization, and colonialism exhibited in contemporary American pluralistic society. This will be done through the analysis of stereotyping, history, cultural practice, and contemporary issues.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Students will study the development of a greater sensitivity to the American Indian through analysis of ethnocentrism, racialization, and colonialism exhibited in contemporary American pluralistic society. This will be done through the analysis of stereotyping, history, cultural practice, and contemporary issues.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 FEthnic StudiesFall 2022
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2022Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2022Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1. Distinguish and compare Native American stereotypes and explain how these stereotypes were created, why they are sustained in modern society, and how they perpetuate the process of racialization, settler colonialism, and eurocentrism.
2. Apply theory and knowledge produced by Native American communities to describe the critical events, histories, cultures, intellectual traditions, contributions, lived-experiences, and social struggles with a particular emphasis on agency and group-affirmation by implementing the process of decolonization and historiography.
3. Analyze the intersection of race and racism as they relate to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, age, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, and language.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
In order to achieve these learning outcomes, during the course students will:
1. Identify, compare, and contrast contemporary American Indian people including but not limited to the Pomo, Wappo, Miwok, Lumbee, Luisen~o, Hopi, Diné (Navajo), Mohawk, Cherokee (Tsalági), Mashpee, Pequot, Creek, Seminole, Miwok, Tlingit, Nez Perce, Acoma, Paiute, Shoshone, Cheyenne, Lakota, and Inuit to recognize the diversity within and across American Indian peoples and nations.
2. Analyze the processes of assimilation and acculturation from across cultural and self-reflective perspectives.
3. Identify attitudes and skills that enable students to become informed, appreciative, and sensitive to the American Indian.
4. Identify and explain issues of racism, colonialism, cultural practices, and current social and political issues of American Indians.
5. Examine, compare, and contrast ritual and social interaction of selected Indian nations, organizations, and movements, and place their activities in a larger social and cultural context.
6. Apply the concept of intersectionality with American Indian people of all classes, genders, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, age, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, and language.
7. Identify and analyze the utilization of phenotype, essentialism, and stereotypes with increased understanding of their effects on Indian communities through application of principles learned.
8. Analyze the roles of American Indian people in the context of American society, rather than as a social problem.
9. Compare and contrast American Indians in a global context with other indigenous people such as the Maori, Inui, Sami, and Aborigines.
10. Recognize the major issues tribes are dealing with in Indian Country, such as health, education, economics, missing women/children, and sovereignty.
11. Identify and explain relationships with other Ethnic groups in the United States such as African American, Asian, Latino(a), and their interactions with American Indians.
12. Identify the complex issues of American Indian Identity and membership in American Indian Nations.
13. Examine the reservation, rancheria, and land-back issues in Indian Country.
 
Ethnic Studies Objectives:
1. Analyze and articulate concepts such as race and racism, racialization, ethnicity, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization, sovereignty, imperialism, settler colonialism, and anti-racism as analyzed in Native American Studies.
2. Apply theory and knowledge produced by Native American communities to describe the critical events, histories, cultures, intellectual traditions, contributions, lived-experiences and social struggles of those groups with a particular emphasis on agency and group-affirmation. 
3. Critically analyze the intersection of race and racism as they relate to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, language, and/or age in Native American communities. 
4. Critically review how struggle, resistance, racial and social justice, solidarity, and liberation, as experienced and enacted by Native Americans are relevant to current and structural issues such as communal, national, international, and transnational politics as, for example, in immigration, reparations, settler-colonialism, multiculturalism, language policies. 
5. Describe and actively engage with anti-racist and anti-colonial issues and the practices and movements in Native American communities to build a just and equitable society.

Topics and Scope
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I. Introduction
    A. New Indian "pre-test"
    B. Contemporary Indian studies
II. American Indian Identity
    A. Population and physical location of American Indian people
    B. Migration and relocation
    C. Legal status in tribal nations
    D. Social labels
    E. Intersectionality
III. Images of Indians
    A. Prejudice/stereotypes
    B. Cultural Pluralism vs. Assimilation
    C. Mass communication images, movies, social media, TV, radio, newspaper
IV. Indian Values, Attitudes and Behaviors
    A. Value systems of diverse tribal groups
    B. Comparison to dominant American values
    C. Policy considerations in institutions
    D. Elders and youth
    E. Gender and sexual orientation issues
V. Government and Indians
    A. Tribal government and sovereignty
    B. Structure and purpose
    C. Relationship with states, counties, and cities
    D. National policies
VI. Health and Family Status
    A. Indian Health Services
    B. Vital statistics
    C. Traditional Indian and Western medical practice
    D. Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA)
VII. Economic Conditions and Economic Development
    A. Income and employment
    B. Resource development
    C. Community role
    D. Socio-economic class
VIII. Education
    A. Attainment and performance: Basic and survival skills
    B. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), public, private
    C. Curriculum and community control
    D. Higher education
    E. Youth and elders
IX. Reservation and Non-Reservation Indian
    A. Reservation land
    B. Urban Indians
    C. Terminated and non-federally recognized Indians
    D. Class system on reservation
X. Social Service
    A. Housing
    B. Law enforcement
    C. Self-determination
XI. International Issues/Indigenous People
    A. Resistance and survival
    B. World Council of Indigenous People
    C. Relationship to ethnic groups in the United States
XII. Future for Indian Cultures
    A. Policy and government
    B. Pan-Indianism
    C. Youth and elders
    D. Gender roles of men and women
    E. Casinos, Sovereignty and Self-determination

Assignments:
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1. Reading of approximately 35-50 pages per week.
 
2. Writing assignment(s) for a minimum of 1,250 words that may include research, experiential, response, journal reviews, cultural assessment, or project.
 
3. Quizzes and exams.
 
4. Optional: oral presentation and/or group project.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 60%
Writing Assignments
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Quizzes and Exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Oral presentation and/or group project


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance. Estes, Nick. Verso. 2019.
 
Red Nation Rising: From Bordertown Violence to Native Liberation. Estes, Nick, and Melanie K. Yazzie, Jennifer Nez Denetdale and David Correia. PM Press. 2021.
 
Native American Voices. 3rd ed. Lobo, Susan, Talbort, Steve & Morris, Traci. Routledge Press. 2016 (classic)
 
Beyond Blood Rethinking Indigenous Identity. Palmater, Pamela D. Purich. 2011 (classic)
 
Modern Tribal Development. Smith, Dean Howard. Alta Mira Press. 2000 (classic)
 
The State of the Native Nations: Conditions under U.S. Policies of Self-determination. The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. Oxford University Press, Inc. 2008 (classic)
 
The Red Deal: Indigenous Action to Save Our Earth. The Red Nation. Common Notions. 2021.
 
Dismembered: Native Disenrollment and the Battle for Human Rights. Wilkins, David Eugene, and Shelly Hulse Wilkins. University of Washington Press. 2017 (classic)

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