SRJC Course Outlines

9/25/2022 5:02:54 AMETHST 70 Course Outline as of Fall 2022

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ETHST 70Title:  INTRO TO NATIVE AMERICAN  
Full Title:  Introduction to Native American Studies
Last Reviewed:10/11/2021

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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American Indian cultures in North America are studied from early cultures to contemporary society. Students will use a cross-disciplinary approach to examine applicable methods and theories that inform the distinct cultural and political organization, analyze and articulate concepts such as race, ethnicity, equity, ethnocentrism, self-determination, liberation, and settler colonialism by applying theory and knowledge produced by Native Americans.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
American Indian cultures in North America are studied from early cultures to contemporary society. Students will use a cross-disciplinary approach to examine applicable methods and theories that inform the distinct cultural and political organization, analyze and articulate concepts such as race, ethnicity, equity, ethnocentrism, self-determination, liberation, and settler colonialism by applying theory and knowledge produced by Native Americans.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2022
Inactive: 
 Area:G
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 FEthnic StudiesFall 2022
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2022Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2022Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1. Identify examples of American Indian traditional knowledge and counter narratives, and apply these to current socio-geopolitical issues, including racialization, equity, ethnocentrism, eurocentrism, settler colonialism, self-determination, liberation, decolonization, and anti-racism.
2. Research and analyze information from multidisciplinary sources and orientations to articulate knowledge of American Indian cultures with special focus on the lived-experiences and social struggles of American Indian peoples and nations.
3. Critically analyze the intersection of race as it relates to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, ability, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, language, and age in Native American communities.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
In order to achieve these learning outcomes, during the course students will:
1. Identify North American Indian cultural geographic regions and differentiate related ecosystems.
2. Recognize exemplary groups within the cultural geographic regions and examine the similarities and differences between diverse tribes of Native America and people from other cultures, European, African, and Latina/Latino who have interacted with Native worldviews and knowledge.
3. Recognize and compare the importance and methods of language preservation in terms of relative cultural heritage traits.
4. Identify and recognize the persistence and diversity of American Indian cultures and the contributions that those diverse cultures have made to America.
5. Distinguish the cultural attributes borrowed from other peoples of the world by Native Americans with a focus on cultural exchange from the past to the present in North America.
6. Illustrate the application and significance of American Indian diversity in a global society.
7. Examine and compare relative attitudes about gender role, sexuality, age, social class, and division of labor in Native American communities.
8. Evaluate and apply American Indian multicultural/traditional perspective relative to socio-geopolitical issues.
9. Explore the relevance of socio-political issues such as, but not limited to, climate change, land sovereignty and sustainability, on Native America and the effect of Native American ideas on globalization.
10. Identify the current multidisciplinary and pedagogical approaches in American Indian Studies methods and theories.
11. Understand and enumerate the effects of age, gender, and social class on the interface between Native and non-Native as well as the challenges, opportunities, and innovations encountered by parties on both sides of those interchanges.
 
Ethnic Studies Objectives:
1. Analyze and articulate concepts such as race and racism, racialization, ethnicity, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization, sovereignty, imperialism, settler colonialism, and anti-racism as analyzed in Native American Studies.
2. Apply theory and knowledge produced by Native American communities to describe the critical events, histories, cultures, intellectual traditions, contributions, lived-experiences and social struggles of those groups with a particular emphasis on agency and group-affirmation. 
3. Critically analyze the intersection of race and racism as they relate to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, language, and/or age in Native American communities. 
4. Critically review how struggle, resistance, racial and social justice, solidarity, and liberation, as experienced and enacted by Native Americans are relevant to current and structural issues such as communal, national, international, and transnational politics as, for example, in immigration, reparations, settler-colonialism, multiculturalism, language policies. 
5. Describe and actively engage with anti-racist and anti-colonial issues and the practices and movements in Native American communities to build a just and equitable society.

Topics and Scope
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I. Language
II. Settlement
III. Economics
IV. Social Organization
V. World View
VI. Gender Studies - Male and Female Cultural Roles in Tribal Areas such as:
    A. Pacific Northwest
         1. Tlingit
         2. Haida
    B. California (Northern and Southern)
         1. Pomo, Miwok, and Wappo of Sonoma County
         2. Luiseño
    C. Plains (Northern and Southern)
         1. Lakota
         2. Kiowa
    D. Southwest
         1. Hopi
         2. Diné (Navajo)
    E. Eastern (Northern and Southern)
         1. Iroquois
         2. Cherokee (Tsalági)
VII. Expressed Form
    A. Traditional knowledge
    B. Counter Narratives
    C. Lived Experiences
VIII. Cultural Regions
    A. Arctic
         1. Inuit
         2. Aleut
    B. Subarctic
         1. Dogrib
         2. Cree
    C. Northwest Coast
         1. Tlingit
         2. Kwakiutl
         3. Chinook
    D. Plateau
         1. Modoc
         2. Nez Perce
    E. California
         1. Yurok
         2. Chumash
         3. Luiseño
    F. Great Basin
         1. Shoshoni
         2. Paiute
    G. Southwest
         1. Hopi
         2. Diné (Navajo)
         3. Mohave
         4. Apache
    H. Eastern Woodlands
         1. Shawnee
         2. Iroquois
         3. Cherokee (Tsalági)
    I. Plains
         1. Cheyenne
         2. Oglala
         3. Kiowa
    J. Southeast
         1. Seminole
         2. Choctaw
IX. Clash of Cultures - Historical and ongoing struggles of resistance, racial and social injustice, socio-political solidarity, and tribal liberation, as expressed through cultural modalities and tribal sovereignty.
    A. Explorers, Colonization, and Cultural Exchange (1492 - 1776)
         1. Spanish
         2. English
         3. French
         4. African Americans
    B. Euro-Americans (1776 - present)
         1. Formation of the United States
         2. Indian Policy
         3. Sovereignty
X. Contemporary American Indians - The complex intersection and historic/contemporary relationship with the American political system, as well as its dynamic impact upon tribal Nations, to examine how Native sovereignty is, and remains expressed through lived experiences, traditional cultural values, customs, and knowledge.
    A. Government Relationship
         1. Bureau of Indian Affairs, B.I.A.
         2. Resources and Land Use
         3. Tribal Governments
    B. Social Issues
         1. Health
         2. Education
         3. Welfare
XI. The Future - An analysis of systemic and institutionalized racism against Native Peoples through a close examination of how current (post 20th century) activist movements, tribal ideologies, academic methodologies, and how the revitalization of traditional practices continue to impact a non-Native reference to tribal identity, and the expressed realities of Native sovereignty, culture, and tribal expressions.
    A. International relationships
    B. Global Communities

Assignments:
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1. Reading of approximately 35-50 pages per week.
 
2. Writing assignment(s) for a minimum of 1,250 words that may include research, experiential, response, journal reviews, cultural assessment, or project.
 
3. Quizzes and exams.
 
4. Optional: oral presentation and/or group project.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 60%
Writing Assignment(s)
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Quizzes and exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Oral presentation and/or group project


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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We Are the Land: A History of Native California. Akins, Damon B. and Bauer, William J. Jr. University of California Press. 2021
 
Native Nations. 2nd ed. Bonvillain, Nancy. Rowman and Littlefield. 2017 (classic)
 
Native American Voices: A Reader, 3rd ed. Lobo, Susan. Talbot, Steve, and Carlston, Traci Morris. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. 2010 (classic)
 
An Introduction to Native North America. 5th ed. Sutton, Mark Q. Routledge. 2017 (classic)

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