SRJC Course Outlines

10/26/2020 11:42:10 AMESL 10 Course Outline as of Fall 2019

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ESL 10Title:  ESL COLLEGE COMPOSITION  
Full Title:  ESL College Composition
Last Reviewed:1/28/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum4.50Lecture Scheduled4.5017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled78.75
Minimum4.50Lab Scheduled08 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total4.50 Contact Total78.75
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  157.50Total Student Learning Hours: 236.25 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course is designed for non-native English speakers and emphasizes preparing students for the writing and critical reading demands across the disciplines by covering academic genres representative of the college at large. Students receive instruction in expository and argumentative writing, appropriate and effective use of language, close reading, cogent thinking, and research strategies. An additional focus is integrated grammar and academic vocabulary instruction based on needs typical of second-language learners.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of ESL 100 or ENGL 100 or appropriate placement based on AB 705 mandates


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course is designed for non-native English speakers and emphasizes preparing students for the writing and critical reading demands across the disciplines by covering academic genres representative of the college at large. Students receive instruction in expository and argumentative writing, appropriate and effective use of language, close reading, cogent thinking, and research strategies. An additional focus is integrated grammar and academic vocabulary instruction based on needs typical of second-language learners.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of ESL 100 or ENGL 100 or appropriate placement based on AB 705 mandates
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2019
Inactive: 
 Area:A
English Composition
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 A2Written CommunicationFall 2019
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 1AEnglish CompositionFall 2019
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2019Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2019Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: ENGL 100 College Composition SRJC Equivalent Course(s): ENGL1A OR ESL10

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Read, analyze, and respond to a representative sampling of academic genres across the
    curriculum with consideration of context, audience, purpose, and culturally-bound references.
2.  Employ a variety of rhetorical strategies to write a comprehensive, well-developed, and
    coherent expository essay with a focused thesis and appropriate support.
3.  Summarize and discuss academic college-level non-fiction and fiction
4.  Competently integrate multiple text sources for the purpose of developing a written argument,
    analysis, or interpretation.
5.  Locate, read, evaluate, analyze, and interpret primary and secondary sources, incorporating
    them into written essays using appropriate documentation.
6.  Self-edit for common second language errors such as verb usage, word forms, and sentence
    boundaries.
7.  Comprehend and use vocabulary from the Academic Word List.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
 
Reading--From a representative sampling of academic genres across the curriculum:
1. Identify the main idea or thesis.
2. Recognize different rhetorical patterns and organizational strategies.
3. Explain how the writer supports and illustrates ideas and connects them to the thesis.
4. Employ active reading strategies.
5. Identify the representative features of different academic genres, including culturally-bound
    references.
6. Use inference skills to identify slant and bias.
7. Identify argumentative techniques and recognize logical fallacies.
8. Demonstrate comprehension of academic texts through discussion and writing.
9. Articulate opinions and assumptions based on academic texts in discussion and writing.
 
Writing--:
1. Write expository and argumentative essays, each with a clearly identifiable thesis,
    totaling 6,000 to 8,000 words.
2. Write essays which demonstrate an understanding of the features of different academic
    genres.
3. Organize essays, paragraphs, and sentences logically and coherently.
4. Develop paragraphs with concrete, appropriate, and relevant details.
5. Apply knowledge of rhetorical patterns to effectively shape paragraphs.
6. Paraphrase, summarize, and synthesize material from paragraphs and essays.
7. Revise essays for clarity, sentence variety, academic variety, and common second-language
    errors in punctuation, grammar, and spelling.
8. Apply appropriate and effective writing strategies to in-class essays.
 
Research--:
1. Demonstrate facility with college-level library research techniques, including online research
    tools.
2. Recognize the difference between primary and secondary sources.
3. Use genre-appropriate documentation style in citing research.

Topics and Scope
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I. Academic Reading
    A. Reading Skills
         1. Comprehension
         2. Analysis
         3. Synthesis
         4. Evaluation
         5. Recognition of culturally-bound references and bias
         6. Understanding different purposes for reading
         7. Acquisition of college-level vocabulary
    B. Recognizing Organizational Patterns/Genres
         1. Narration
         2. Description
         3. Process
         4. Definition
         5. Compare and Contrast
         6. Cause and Effect
         7. Analysis
         8. Synthesis
         9. Argument/Persuasion
II. The Writing Process
    A. Pre-writing
    B. Drafting
    C. Revision
    D. Editing
    E. Formatting
III. Structuring Essays
    A. Introductory devices
    B. Thesis statements
    C. Body Organization
         1. Topic sentences
         2. Paragraph organization and developments
         3. Rhetorical strategies to create effective essays
         4. Research to effectively support arguments
    D. Conclusions
    E. Academic Vocabulary
         1. Word choice
         2. Word forms
         3. Roots and affixes
    F. Formatting
IV. Information Literacy
    A. Library Resources
    B. Evaluating Sources
    C. Reading, Analyzing, and Synthesizing Information
V. Use of Sources
   A. Documentation Format
   B. Plagiarism
         1. Unintentional
         2. Intentional

Assignments:
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Representative assignments will include but are not limited to:
 
Reading:
1. Read essays with emphasis on critical reading involving analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of
    ideas. The number of pages assigned per week will vary depending on the complexity
2. Discuss readings in order to examine main ideas, organizational patterns and genres, slant and
    bias, and culturally-bound references
3. Read and analyze the English Department's Work of Literary Merit for the particular semester
    or a full-length work of fiction or non-fiction
 
Writing:
Students will write, revise, and edit the equivalent of 6,000 words during the semester.
Assignments will be of various lengths focusing on representative academic genres such as
narration, description, process, cause and effect, evaluation, argument/persuasion, short answer,
summary, and synthesis. Students will be asked to do the following:
 
1. Two to three expository essays or genre-specific writing of approximately 1,000 words each
2. A research essay of 1200 to 1500 words for which library resources and appropriate
    documentation format are used
3. Five to seven responses to college-level readings and/or the Work of Literary Merit
4. Summaries of college-level non-fiction readings
5. At least two in-class writings
6. Written exercises to improve specific aspects of writing, such as thesis invention,
    organizational strategies, development techniques, research exercises, etc.
7. Specific exercises in paraphrasing, summarizing, synthesizing, and annotating
8. Editing for common second language errors such as verb tense, word form, punctuation, etc.
9. Exams and quizzes (2 - 5)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
70 - 80%
Essay of varying lengths; reading journals; writing exercises dealing with grammar and style; written analyses of readings
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
5 - 10%
Research exercises
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
5 - 20%
Exams and Quizzes: Multiple choice, Matching items, Completion, Short Answer, Essay Exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 15%
Attendance and participation in class discussions


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Best American Essays of 2017. Jamison, Leslie and Atwan, Robert. Mariner Books. 2017
Ways of Reading. 11th ed. Bartholme, David and Petrosky, Anthony and Waite, Stacey. Bedford/St. Martin's Press. 2016
50 Essays: A Portable Anthology. 5th ed. Cohen, Samuel. Bedford/St. Martins. 2016
Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and Guide. 13th ed. Kirszner, Laurie G. & Mandell,
Stephen G. Bedford/St. Martins. 2016
The Call to Write. 6th ed. Trimbur, John. Cengage Learning. 2014 (classic)
Writing in the Disciplines. 7th ed. Kennedy, Mary Lynch and Kennedy, William. Pearson. 2011 (classic)
Writing Now: Shaping Words and Images. Katz, Susan and Odell, Lee. Bedford/St. Martins. 2010 (classic)
Best American Essays of the Century. Oates, Joyce and Atwan, Robert. Mariner. 2001 (classic)
 
Work of Literary Merit (W.O.L.M): Each semester the English Department selects a Work of
Literary Merit. Typically, at least four faculty lectures are given and special
library resources are provided for this project.

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