SRJC Course Outlines

12/13/2019 10:33:56 PMENGL 25 Course Outline as of Summer 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ENGL 25Title:  INTRO TO LANGUAGE STUDY  
Full Title:  Introduction to Language Study
Last Reviewed:12/10/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Study of the nature and structure of language including: language and the mind; child language acquisition; language in its social setting; language and culture; language change; applications of the science of linguistics.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Completion of ENGL 100 or ESL 100 or higher or equivalent or appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Study of the nature and structure of language including language and the mind; child language acquisition; language in its social setting; language and culture; language change; applications of the science of linguistics.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Completion of ENGL 100 or ESL 100 or higher or equivalent or appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:E
Humanities
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C2HumanitiesFall 1996
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3BHumanitiesFall 1996
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Analyze and discuss language using the basic concepts and terminology of the field of
    linguistics
2.  Describe the structures and functions of language from a scientific perspective
3.  Apply the core concepts of linguistics to a number of fields of study, including their own
    academic and career paths

Objectives: Untitled document
By the end of this course, students will be able to:
 
1. Identify the unique features of human language, especially in contrast with other
    communication systems.
2. Identify and describe the nature of language from a scientific approach, including the
    structures, social functions, and acquisition of language.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of universals and variations in language systems.
4. Evaluate, through speaking and writing, beliefs, attitudes, and claims made about language.
5. Identify applications of linguistics to academic disciplines, (World Languages, English
    Literature, Anthropology, Sociology) and career paths (Child Development, Speech
    Pathology, Education, Computer Science).

Topics and Scope
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I. The Nature of Human Language
    A. Human communication systems vs. nonhuman communication systems
    B. Nonverbal communication
    C. Language and the brain
    D. Written versus signed and spoken language
    E. Universal Grammar
II. The Sound System of Language
    A. Articulatory Phonetics
          1. Anatomy of the vocal system
         2. Voicing and phonation types
         3. The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
    B. Phonology
          1. Phonemes and allophones
         2. Syllable structure            
         3. Phonological rules and analysis
III. Morphology
     A. Morphemes
     B. Morphological rules and analysis
    C. Derivational processes of new words, such as clipping, blending, etc.
IV. Syntax
    A. Lexical categories
    B. Constituency structure of phrases and sentences
    C. Lexical and structural ambiguity
V. Semantics and Pragmatics
    A. Lexical meaning
     B. Sentence meaning
    C. Utterance meaning
VI. Language Development
    A. First language acquisition
    B. Second language acquisition
VII. Language in Society
    A. Sociolinguistics and social contexts of language
          1. Dialects of American English, including African-American English and Latinx varieties
              of English
          2. Language and education  
          3. Language and culture
         4. Pidgins and creoles
         5. Registers
     B. Linguistic discrimination
         1. Case studies of language bias and linguistic discrimination
         2. Real-world applications of linguistics to address language-based discrimination in areas
              such as education, criminal justice system, and healthcare.  
VIII. Language Variation and Change
    A. Language shifts
    B. Endangered languages
    C. Patterns of language use in relation to features, such as age, class, gender, identity, and
         community membership
IX. Sign Language
    A. The structures of sign language, including phonology, morphology, and syntax
    B. Deaf culture and sign language
X. Linguistic Field Observations
    A. Qualitative observations of language-in-use
    B. Quantitative observations of language-in-use

Assignments:
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1. Textbook and supplemental reading assignments, 30 - 50 pages per week
2. Writing assignments, including written portions of Fieldwork assignments and other writing
    assignments, such as:
    a. Journal-based writing linking course concepts to students' everyday experiences with
         language and culture (e.g. language in the news)
    b. Research-based essays
3. Problem-Solving assignments, such as:
    a. Fieldwork Assignments
    b. Textbook-based homework problems, (e.g. transcriptions)
4. Skill demonstrations, such as:
    a. Fieldwork Assignments (data analysis)
    b. Observation Reports (e.g. SRJC Children's Center, nonverbal communication, or Second
         Language Acquisition)
5. Quizzes (0 - 4) and Exams (0 - 2)
6. Other - Participation, such as:
    a. Research Presentations
    b. Group research projects

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
40 - 60%
Writing assignments
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 20%
Problem-solving assignments
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
15 - 20%
Skill demonstration assignments
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 25%
Quizzes and exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 15%
Participation and/or research presentation or project


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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An Introduction to Language. 11th ed. Fromkin, Victoria and Rodman, Robert and Hyams, Nina. Cengage Learning. 2018
 
Language Files: Materials for an Introduction to Language and Linguistics. 12th ed. Department of Linguistics. Ohio State University Press. 2016
 
A  Concise Introduction to Linguistics. 4th ed. Rowe, Bruce and Levine, Diane. Routledge. 2014 (classic)
 
Linguistics for Everyone: An Introduction. 2nd ed. Denham, Kristin and Lobeck, Anne. Cengage Learning. 2013 (classic)
 
Language Matters. 2nd ed. Napoli, Donna and Lee-Schoenfeld, Vera. Oxford University Press. 2010 (classic)
 
Language Myths. Bauer, Laurie and Trudgill, Peter. Penguin. 1999 (classic)

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