SRJC Course Outlines

5/25/2024 3:47:58 AMDIET 55 Course Outline as of Fall 2024

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  DIET 55Title:  FOOD PRODUCTION MGT  
Full Title:  Food Production Management
Last Reviewed:12/12/2023

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum2.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum2.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total2.00 Contact Total35.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 105.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
Students will learn about the fundamentals of food service management in the healthcare setting (hospitals, intermediate and long term care). Will provide students with training in menu development and recipe standardization; food selection, purchasing, storage, preparation, and service; cleaning and waste disposal; equipment selection and maintenance; evaluating quality, efficiency, and safety of food service system; kitchen design; cost and inventory control; emergency plans; and complying with applicable federal, state, and local regulations.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Students will learn about the fundamentals of food service management in the healthcare setting (hospitals, intermediate and long term care). Will provide students with training in menu development and recipe standardization; food selection, purchasing, storage, preparation, and service; cleaning and waste disposal; equipment selection and maintenance; evaluating quality, efficiency, and safety of food service system; kitchen design; cost and inventory control; emergency plans; and complying with applicable federal, state, and local regulations.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
Untitled document
1. Identify and apply principles of food service management best practices, including menu writing, inventory management, recipe standardization, meeting a budget, ensuring food quality, and complying with food safety standards and federal, state, and local regulations.
2. Demonstrate readiness to take the national credentialing exam for Certified Dietary Managers (CDM), administered by the Certifying Board for Dietary Managers or the Registration Exam for Dietetic Technicians, administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
1. Describe the role of the CDM and the Dietetic Technician Registered (DTR) in the healthcare foodservice setting (hospitals, long term care facilities, and intermediate care facilities).
2. Describe the differences between commercial foodservice (restaurant) and non-commercial foodservice (hospital, intermediate and long-term care facility).
3. Identify quantity food preparation equipment commonly found in a commercial kitchen.
4. Describe a safe and efficient flow of food from receiving to service, including location of storage, preparation, waste disposal, and ware washing for a quantity meal service operation.
5. Develop a seasonally appropriate multi-day cycle menu that meets budget restrictions, follows nutrition guidelines and basics of good menu planning, and is acceptable to a defined target population.
6. Choose nutritionally appropriate food substitutes in a menu.
7. Convert recipes into standard, block form, scaling for different yields, including production for over 100 portions, and including specifics for ensuring appropriate portioning for service.
8. Compose a food order for a meal from any menu using standardized recipes.
9. Evaluate stores to write an appropriate food order that meets quality standards and budget limitations.
10. List records necessary to comply with all federal, state, and local regulations.
11. Calculate total and per portion costs for standardized recipes.
12. Plan procedures to operate foodservice operation sustainably: minimizing water, gas, and electricity use, as well as food waste and garbage generation.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
I. Introduction to Foodservice Management in the Healthcare Setting
    A. Role of the CDM and the DTR in healthcare foodservice
    B. Differences between commercial foodservice and non-commercial foodservice  
II. Meal Service Styles
    A. Meal service for non-commercial foodservice operations     
     B. Equipment for maintaining food temperatures
     C. Culture Change in long term care
III. Menus
    A. Regulatory requirements in menu planning
    B. Menu planning considerations and menu options       
     C. Food substitutions
     D. Therapeutic diets, diet liberalization, and diet spreadsheets
    E. Target nutrients used in menu planning
IV. Recipe Development
    A. Produce a recipe for use in a commercial kitchen      
     B. Calculate total cost and per portion cost of a standardized recipe      
    C. Portion control and portioning tools
    D. Edible Portion (EP) and As Purchased (AP) conversions)
    E. Develop food and supply orders
V. The Purchasing Process
    A. Regulatory requirements for purchasing food and supplies
    B. Purchasing objectives and terminology
    C. Product specifications
    D. Inventory management methods
    E. Sourcing options for food and supplies      
     F. Ethics in purchasing
VI. Receiving and Storage
    A. Regulatory requirements for food and supply storage
    B. Best practices for receiving and storage of food and supplies     
     C. Refrigerator and freezer temperatures
    D. Labeling and dating of food products
VII. Standards and Procedures for Preparing Food   
     A. Meat, poultry, and fish    
     B. Eggs, milk, and cheese
    C. Grains, sauces, and starches
    D. Fruits and vegetables
VIII. Food Production Systems
    A. Records needed to comply with federal, state, and local regulations
    B. Records for monitoring food quality
     C. Forecasting, production sheets, and diet spreadsheet
    D. Production scheduling
    E. Common cooking terms
    F. Controlling energy and water usage
IX. Department Design and Layout
    A. Regulations regarding kitchen design and layout
    B. Operation and cleaning of quantity food production equipment
     C. Factors that influence the design of a foodservice facility
    D. Lighting, ventilation, wall, and floor surfaces
    E. Capital budget
    F. Equipment specification
X.  Revenue and Cash Handling
    A. Food and labor costs, and profit margins
    B. Catering and special events
XI. Emergency/Disaster Food Planning
    A. Emergency food and water requirements and procedures

Assignments:
Untitled document
1. Weekly reading approximately (10 pages)
2. Foodservice math practice sheets (15-20)
3. Presentation on the use and cleaning of a piece of commercial kitchen equipment.
4. Work individually and collaboratively to design a seasonally appropriate multi-day cycle menu.
5. Commercial kitchen recipe development project
6. Catered meal planning project
7. International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative (IDDSI) Food Preparation Project
8. Quizzes (8-10)
9. Midterm exams (2)
10. Final exam

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
5 - 10%
Written multi-day cycle menu
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
20 - 40%
Foodservice math practice sheets; recipe development project; catered meal planning project
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 10%
Presentation on kitchen equipment; IDDSI food preparation project
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Quizzes; midterm exams; final exam
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 10%
Participation and attendance


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
Untitled document
Foodservice Management by Design. 3rd ed. Legvold, Dee and Salisbury, Kristi. Association of Nutrition and Foodservice Professionals. 2020.

Print PDF