SRJC Course Outlines

11/24/2020 4:50:00 AMCSKLS 373 Course Outline as of Fall 2019

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CSKLS 373Title:  FOUND OF MATH REAS  
Full Title:  Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning
Last Reviewed:1/28/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.50Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.50Lab Scheduled2.006 min.Lab Scheduled35.00
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 192.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Non-Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course is intended as an introduction for students in how to apply mathematical reasoning to their personal, professional, and academic lives. Students will learn how to do so via application problems that will require investigating new contexts, developing and proposing possible solutions, discussing and analyzing proposed plans, and making decisions. Topics include order of operations, real numbers, ratio and proportions, solving linear equations, dimensional analysis, geometric formulas, graphs/tables, and word problems. Regularly scheduled lab assignments reinforce or supplement lecture topics.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course is intended as an introduction for students in how to apply mathematical reasoning to their personal, professional, and academic lives. Students will learn how to do so via application problems that will require investigating new contexts, developing and proposing possible solutions, discussing and analyzing proposed plans, and making decisions. Topics include order of operations, real numbers, ratio and proportions, solving linear equations, dimensional analysis, geometric formulas, graphs/tables, and word problems. Regularly scheduled lab assignments reinforce or supplement lecture topics.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Apply mathematical reasoning and modeling to investigate, analyze, develop, propose
    possible solutions, and make decisions related to life experiences.
2.  Use standard mathematical terminology and notation when describing, presenting and solving
    problems.
3.  Apply basic concepts of real numbers, estimation skills, linear equations, their
    interconnections, and their uses in analyzing and solving real-world problems.
4.  Apply concepts of ratio, proportions, rate of change, their interconnections, and their uses in
    analyzing and solving real-world problems.
5.  Apply concepts of graphs, tables, statistics (measures of center), and equations in analyzing
    and solving real-world problems

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1.   Demonstrate self-directed learning skills such as time management and personal
      responsibility through the completion of course requirements.
2.   Demonstrate an understanding of fractions, decimals, and percentages by representing
      quantities in equivalent forms, comparing and interpreting numbers in different forms.
3.   Strengthen basic computational skills with real numbers, estimation skills, and number sense.
4.   Use dimensional analysis to convert units of measurements.
5.   Use appropriate technology in a given context.
6.   Use tables, graphs, charts, and equations to describe and interpret information.
7.   Use formulas to solve problems with common geometric shapes (perimater, circumference,
      area, and volume)
8.   Calculate, compare and interpret measure of center to make decisions.
9.   Apply algebraic and proportional reasoning concepts and techniques to solve complex
      problems.
10. Construct and use mathematical models to solve problems from a variety of contexts and
      make predictions/decisions.

Topics and Scope
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I. Learning Skills
     A. Math pathway
    B. Self-assessment and goal-setting
    C. Study techniques
    D. Support services, including:
         1. Math Lab
         2. Tutorial Center
         3. Student consultation hours
         4. Counseling
         5. Learning opportunities
         6. Mathematical habits of mind
              a. interpreting contextualized problems
              b. predicting solutions
              c. analyzing different ideas
              d. revising thinking and solutions
    E. Collaborate to collect, assemble, discuss, and present culturally-relevant information using
         team member knowledge, discipline-specific reading and research strategies
II.  Numerical Reasoning
    A. Order of operations with real numbers
    B. Place value, magnitude, and rounding of numbers
    C. Estimation skills
    D. Exponents, scientific notation and standard notation
    E. Fractions, percentages, and decimals conversions and operations
    F. Dimensional analysis
III. Data Analysis and Probability
    A. Calculating and interpreting measures of central tendency
    B. Reading and interpreting charts, graphs, and tables (histograms, line graphs, bar graphs,
         scatterplots)
    C. Mathematical modeling and applications
IV. Proportional Reasoning
    A. Ratios and proportions
    B. Rate of change
    C. Simple versus compound interest
    D. Scaling and shrinking (perimeter, area, and volume)
    E. Mathematical modeling and applications
V. Algebraic Reasoning
    A. Variables versus constants
    B. Evaluating formulas and expressions
    C. Writing and simplifying algebraic expressions
    D. Solving equations (multi-step equations, proportions, literal equations)
    E. Expressing and interpreting relationships using inequality symbols
    F.  Using linear models to represent information about change
    G. Mathematical modeling and applications (linear and exponential contexts included)
 
* All sections are covered in the lecture and lab portions of the course.

Assignments:
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Lecture-Related Assignments:
1. Homework assignments (20 - 30)
2. Quizzes (15 - 25)
3. Unit tests (4 - 6)
4. Final exam
 
Lab-Related Assignments:
1. Lab and/or online assignments, in-class assignments (30 - 60 problems per week)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
20 - 40%
Homework problems, lab assignments, in-class assignments
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
50 - 70%
Quizzes, unit tests, final exam
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Lecture and lab participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Foundations of Math Reasoning (MyMathLab Access Kit). Dana Center. Pearson. 2016
Instructor prepared materials

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