SRJC Course Outlines

6/20/2018 11:40:12 PMCS 74.42B Course Outline as of Fall 2017

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CS 74.42BTitle:  GAME DEVELOPMENT 2  
Full Title:  Game Development 2
Last Reviewed:3/31/2014

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled08 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  0Total Student Learning Hours: 0 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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A survey of fundamental game development techniques. The basics of artificial intelligence, animation, 2D and 3D real-time  rendering, and collision detection/response are covered through the development of a game engine written in JavaScript. Students in this class will collaborate to develop games using a realistic industry workflow, from conception through completion. This course also addresses professional issues, such as creating resumes and portfolios, technical interviews, and finding engineering jobs within the games industry.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of CS 74.42A


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A survey of fundamental game development techniques. The basics of artificial intelligence, animation, 2D and 3D real-time  rendering, and collision detection/response are covered through the development of a game engine written in JavaScript. Students in this class will collaborate to develop games using a realistic industry workflow, from conception through completion. This course also addresses professional issues, such as creating resumes and portfolios, technical interviews, and finding engineering jobs within the games industry.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of CS 74.42A
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Spring 2011Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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Students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate the basics of several major subtasks of creating a game: artificial intelligence,
    animation, real-time rendering, gameplay.
2. Create resumes and portfolio websites, be prepared for technical interviews, and be prepared
    to pursue an engineering career in the games industry.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. Solve artificial intelligence, rendering, and animation problems.
2. Create video games of moderate complexity.
3. Discuss common workflow practices in the games industry.
4. Craft compelling resumes and portfolios.
5. Prepare for rigorous and technical interview process.

Topics and Scope
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I. Animation
    A. Frame-based animation
    B. Elapsed game time vs. real time
    C. Particle systems
II. Rendering
    A. Programmable graphics hardware
         1. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architecture summary
         2. GLSL and HLSL
         3. Vertex, pixel, geometry, and compute shaders
    B. The CUP side
         1. Feeding the animal - getting the GPU to draw stuff
         2. Renderer architecture and performance considerations
III. Data Driven Development
    A. Ways to define your data
     B. Extensible Mark-up Language (XML)
IV. Gameplay Engineering
    A. Save and load game state
    B. User interface
    C. Heads-up display
    D. Collision detection and response
V. Industry Workflow
    A. Standard workflows and source control
    B. Collaboration with artists and designers
    C. Technical interviews
    D. Technical resumes
    E. Portfolio development
     F. Milestones for game development
         1. Concept document
         2. Game design document
         3. Technical design document
         4. Prototype
         5. Production
         6. Alpha
         7. Beta
         8. Gold
VI. Professional Issues
    A. Creating resumes and portfolios
    B. Technical interviews
    C. Preparation for and finding engineering jobs within the game industry

Assignments:
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1. Read approximately 25-30 pages a week
2. Weekly project milestones: students solve iterative programming and workflow problems
3. Prepare sample questions for technical interviews
4. In-class technical interviews: students will interview each other
5. Preparation of a sample resume and portfolio website
6. Written concept, game design, and technical documentation for a team based final project
7. Final project: a working game that demonstrates the use of the techniques developed in this
    class

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 20%
Written concept and technical documentation
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
30 - 40%
Interative programming, game design, and workflow problems
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
50 - 50%
In-class technical interviews and final project
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks:
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Hall, Joseph. XNA Game Studio Express: Developing Games for Windows and the Xbox 360. Course Technology PTR, 2007.
Lobao, Alexandra Santos. Beginning XNA 3.0 Game Programming: From Novice to Professional. Apress, 2009.
Nitschke, Benjamin. Professional XNA Game Programming. Wrox, 2008.
Reed, Aaron. Learning XNA 3.0: XNA 3.0 Game Development for the PC, Xbox 360, and Zune. O'Reilly Media, 2008.
Instructor prepared materials

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