SRJC Course Outlines

12/1/2020 4:15:47 PMCS 41 Course Outline as of Fall 2020

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CS 41Title:  GAME DESIGN  
Full Title:  Game Design
Last Reviewed:11/26/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum4.00Lecture Scheduled4.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled70.00
Minimum4.00Lab Scheduled08 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total4.00 Contact Total70.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  140.00Total Student Learning Hours: 210.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  CS 74.41

Catalog Description:
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This course will introduce students to the basics of game design and theory using analysis, research, critiques and projects. Students will learn about the game industry and what is required to develop a video game through assignments. Students will design, model and build working video game prototypes.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course will introduce students to the basics of game design and theory using analysis, research, critiques and projects. Students will learn about the game industry and what is required to develop a video game through assignments. Students will design, model and build working video game prototypes.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2010Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2020Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Examine and critically discuss the components of games.
2.  Identify, examine and differentiate various aspects that make a game fun and compelling.
3.  Apply the principles of theoretically sound game design including gameplay, core mechanics,
    game balancing, and iterative rapid prototyping.
4.  Develop analytical skills which can be applied to the multiple uses of both computer hardware
    and software products for simulation gaming.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. Create, develop and implement effective game design documents and supporting concept art
    and storyboard drawings for a proposed video game.
2. Perform critical steps to conceive, design, implement and playtest video game prototypes,
    models and assets.
3. Demonstrate teamwork skills in the development of video games.
4. Present working 3D and/or 2D game prototypes both non-digital and digital games.

Topics and Scope
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I. Role of Game Designer
    A. Player-centric game design process
    B. Game designer skills: passion, communication, teamwork, creativity, and process control
    C. Famous game designers
II. Iterative Design Process
    A. Brainstorming
    B. Game concept idea
    C. Game pitch
    D. Physical prototype
    E. Design documentation
    F. Playtesting
    G. Production
    H. Quality assurance
III. Structure of Games
    A. Players
    B. Objectives, challenges, encounters, and actions
    C. Cooperative versus cooperation play
    D. 2D versus 3D
    E. Goals, win/loss, termination conditions
IV. Game Design Principles and Methodologies
    A. Formal elements of games
    B. Game core mechanics, dynamics, and aesthetics
    C. Concept art and storyboarding
    D. Rules development and structure
    E. Gameplay
         1. Hierarchy of challenges
         2. Skill, stress and absolute difficulty
         3. Commonly used challenges
    F. Game balancing
         1. Asymmetrical game balancing and fairness
         2. Strategy versus luck
         3. Difficulty curves, story pace, player abilities, and character skills
         4. Risk versus reward
    G. Flow and player psychology
    H. Characters, cameras, and control
         1. Player character and non-player characters (NPC)
         2. Cameras: first person, 3rd person, isometric, and virtual/augmented reality
         3. Control: input, actions, and behaviors
    I. Iterative process and rapid prototyping techniques
V. Game Design Documentation
    A. High concept document
    B. Game pitch and document
    C. Level design document
VI. 3D Modeling Introduction and Principles
    A. Modeling concepts
    B. Model implementation
VII. Environment and Game Level Design
    A. Design of environment and world building
    B. Level design document
    C. Player encounters, challenges, heads-up display (HUD), audio, and collectables
    D. Level assets and resources
    E. Iterative prototyping
    F. Playtesting
VIII. Game Production and Roles
    A. Game designer, programmer, artist, and producer
    B. Milestones, deliverables, and production workflow
IX. Platforms
    A. Desktop
    B. Mobile
    C. Console
    D. Virtual reality
    E. Augmented reality
X. Game Creation: Digital and Non-digital
    A. Idea and design
    B. Prototyping
    C. Playtesting
    D. Completing original games
    E. Analysis and review

Assignments:
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1.   Read 15 - 20 pages per week
2.   Written review of a favorite video game (1 page)
3.   Written assignments on research topics (7 - 9 one-page assignments and/or
      discussions)
4.   Exams (0 - 3)
5.   Game design projects (6 or more)
6.   Final project
7.   Game level project
8.   3D modeling tutorial and project
9.   Drawings which will include storyboarding and concept art
10. Game level map

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
5 - 10%
Review and research assignments
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
50 - 70%
Game design projects, game level project, and 3D modeling tutorial and project
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
20 - 30%
Final project, drawings, and game level map
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 25%
Exam(s)
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Attendance, participation, and/or research assignment discussions


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Instructor prepared materials
The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses. Schell, Jesse. 2nd ed. AK Peters/CRC Press. 2014 (classic)
Level Up! The Guide to Great Game Design. 2nd ed. Rogers, Scott. Wiley. 2014 (classic)
Fundamentals of Game Design. 3rd ed. Adams, Ernest. New Riders Press. 2013 (classic)
Challenges for Game Designers. Brathwaite, Brenda and Schreiber, Ian. Charles River Media. 2008 (classic)

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