SRJC Course Outlines

12/1/2020 4:28:44 PMCS 40 Course Outline as of Fall 2020

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CS 40Title:  HISTORY OF GAMES  
Full Title:  History of Games
Last Reviewed:11/26/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  CS 74.40

Catalog Description:
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This course includes a comprehensive study of the evolution of games throughout human history, with an emphasis on early games' impact and influence on video games. Review of the technological and artistic antecedents, with analysis of how video games reflect the beliefs, aspirations and values of the cultures where they flourish. Study includes gameplay experience and analysis of notable game genres, identifying significant artistic and technological innovations. Students will investigate gameplay and create a non-digital game that is informed by the study of game history.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course includes a comprehensive study of the evolution of games throughout human history, with an emphasis on early games' impact and influence on video games. Review of the technological and artistic antecedents, with analysis of how video games reflect the beliefs, aspirations and values of the cultures where they flourish. Study includes gameplay experience and analysis of notable game genres, identifying significant artistic and technological innovations. Students will investigate gameplay and create a non-digital game that is informed by the study of game history.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2019
Inactive: 
 Area:E
Humanities
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2019Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2020Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Interpret the interaction of society and culture with games throughout history and construct
    comprehensive analyses of the impact of video games on popular culture.
2.  Analyze how technological innovations furthered the use of video games as a platform for
    artistic expression.
3.  Compare and contrast video game styles and genres throughout time.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. Discuss the history of games throughout human history using chronological reasoning.
2. Demonstrate higher-order thinking skills including evaluation and use of evidence about
    issues, problems, and explanations for the influence of video games on popular culture.
3. Explore problems in the history of game design and, where possible, solve them.
4. Develop, test, and evaluate rival hypotheses from primary sources about the history of video
    games.
5. Construct sound arguments and interpretation about video games and popular culture; and
    evaluate the arguments and interpretation of others.

Topics and Scope
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I. Understanding Games and Culture
    A. The relevance of games
    B. Children's games
    C. Games and human nature
    D. Definitions of games
    E. Games as closed systems
    F. The field of play
    G. A working definition of games
    H. Elements of traditional games
     I. Terminology of traditional games
    J. Applications of play
II. The Historical Origins of Game Forms
    A. Games, play and culture
         1. Prehistoric games
         2. Knucklebones
    B. Ancient board games
         1. Mancala
         2. Royal Game of Ur
         3. Knossos
         4. Games of ancient Egypt
         5. Games of ancient India
         6. Games of ancient China
         7. Games of ancient Rome
    C. History of playing cards
         1. Chinese origins of playing cards
         2. Mamluk playing cards
         3. Cards in Europe
         4. Suit systems in Europe
         5. Tarot cards
         6. Prohibitions on cards and gambling
         7. Hanafuda cards
         8. Mahjong
    D. Development of war games
         1. Games and warfare
         2. Rome and war
         3. Gladiator game
         4. Jousting
         5. Yabusame
         6. Buzkashi
         7. Aztec flower wars
         8. Koenigspiel
         9. Modern war games
         10. Hobby tabletop war gaming
III. The Evolution of Games
    A. The rise of commercial board games
         1. The Industrial Revolution and game publishers
         2. Snakes and Ladders
         3. The first American board game
         4. The Mansion of Happiness
         5. The Game of Life
         6. Education and games
         7. Monopoly
         8. The advent of narrative gaming
         9. Dungeons & Dragons
    B. The morality of gaming
         1. Milton Bradley
         2. Parker Brothers
         3. 20th Century: competition, collapse and consolidation
IV. The Birth of Electronic Gaming
    A. 1940s - 1960s: Pioneers
         1. William Higinbotham and Tennis For Two
         2. Steve Russell and Spacewar!
    B. 1961 - 1972: Early visionaries
         1. Ralph Baer and the Odyssey
         2. Nolan Bushnell and Computer Space
V. 1972 - 1976: Atari and the Rise of Arcade Games
    A. Al Alcorn and Pong
    B. Competition emerges
VI. 1977 - 1979: An Industry Matures
    A. Video games become a consumer project
    B. Gaming in Japan and the growth of Nintendo - Hiroshi Yamaguchi
VII. 1980 - 1982: High Water Mark
    A. Golden age of arcade games
    B. Game designers recognized as creative artists
VIII. 1983 - 1985: Crash and Recovery
    A. Demise of Atari: lessons learned
    B. Nintendo in Japan and North America
         1. Nintendo's NES and its impact
         2. Shigero Miyamoto
    C. Legal status of video games: significant legal decisions
     D. Behind the Iron Curtain: Alexey Pajitnov and Tetris
IX. 1986 - 1991: The Console Wars Continue
     A. Nintendo vs Sega
    B. Yuji Naka and Sonic the Hedgehog
    C. Differences between Japanese and North American consumers
    D. Gunpei Yokoi and the Gameboy
X. 1992 - 1994: The Arrival of 32-Bit Consoles
    A. Controversies, Congress and the ESRB
    B. Sony and the PlayStation
    C. Evolution of PC Games
XI. 1995 - 1999: 64-Bit and the Birth of Online Gaming
XII. 2000 - 2001: Sony, Sega, Sims and Sixth Generation Consoles
    A. PlayStation leads the pack
    B. Demise of Sega: Death of Dreamcast
    C. Xbox and GameCube arrive
    D. Will Wright and The Sims
XIII. 2001 and Beyond: Challenges in the New Millennium
    A. New platforms and business models emerge
         1. Social, mobile, and free-to-play
         2. The Wii and its broad appeal
         3. Rebirth of casual gaming
    B. Serious games as a creative platform
    C. Online software distribution
    D. Indie games go mainstream - Markus Person and Minecraft
    E. Edu-gaming
    F. Gamification
    G. Ethics, controversies, and challenges
         1. Violence in games
         2. Inclusivity: race, gender, and LGBTQ+
         3. Industry workplace issues
         4. Addiction
XIV. Games in Film, Television, Music and Print
    A. The fear of technology as expressed in films about AI and games
         1. 2001: A Space Odyssey
         2. Tron
         3. WarGames
    B. Utopian and dystopian visions of virtual reality in film, books, and popular culture
         1. The Matrix
         2. Black Mirror "Santa Rosa" episode
         3. William Gibson
    C. Commodification and popularization of game characters in music and popular culture
         1. Character franchises of Nintendo and Sega
         2. Integration of popular music in console titles
XV. The Aesthetics of Video Game Design
    A. Ludology vs narratology
    B. Game aesthetics shared with other art forms
    C. Playtesting and the aesthetics of interactivity
XVI. Non-Digital Game Design
    A. MDA: mechanics, dynamics, and aesthetics
         1. Mechanics
         2. Dynamics
         3. Aesthetics
    B. Game design documents
XVII. The Future of the Video Game Industry

Assignments:
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1. Read approximately 25-30 pages a week from course textbook and/or instructor-provided
    reading materials
2. Create one to three (1-3) timelines of periods in the history of games, such as the rise of home
    gaming consoles
3. Prepare five to seven (5-7) written documents that address the influence of historical facts,
    relevant court cases, social movements, and technological advances, on specific games
    or trends in the history of games, three to seven (3-7) pages each
4. Regular participation in zero to fourteen (0-14) online discussion forums
5. Playtest six to ten (6-10) online versions of traditional and/or modern games and provide
    analysis on game mechanics, dynamics, and aesthetics
6. Midterm and final exams

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 60%
Timelines and written documents
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 40%
Playtesting analyses
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
10 - 20%
Mid-term and final exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Attendance, participation, and/or discussion posts


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Game On!: Video Game History from Pong to Pac-Man to Mario, Minecraft and More. Hansen, Dustin. Macmillan Publishing Group, 2016
Replay: The History of Video Games. Donovan, Tristan. Yellow Ant. 2010. (classic)
Instructor prepared materials

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