SRJC Course Outlines

5/20/2019 6:32:49 PMCHLD 95 Course Outline as of Fall 2016

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CHLD 95Title:  DEVELOPING SOC COMPETNCE  
Full Title:  Developing Social Competence in the Early Childhood Years
Last Reviewed:4/25/2016

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course will focus on healthy social and emotional development of young children as the foundation for early learning. This course is designed to provide early childhood educators, parents, and others with the skills and information necessary for fostering children's social competence in the early childhood years. Students will acquire strategies to promote children's social and emotional development and use methodology to address challenging behaviors and mental health needs.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent and Course Completion of CHLD 10 and CHLD 90.1

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course will focus on healthy social and emotional development of young children as the foundation for early learning. This course is designed to provide early childhood educators, parents, and others with the skills and information necessary for fostering children's social competence in the early childhood years. Students will acquire strategies to promote children's social and emotional development and use methodology to address challenging behaviors and mental health needs.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent and Course Completion of CHLD 10 and CHLD 90.1
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2016Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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Students will be able to:
1. Apply an understanding of child development to promote and support social and emotional competence in young children as a foundation for learning.
2. Describe a variety of interaction and guidance strategies to encourage positive social and emotional development in young children.
3. Plan and implement curriculum and create environments to stimulate young children's social and emotional development, including prosocial behavior,  self-esteem and self-regulation.
4.  Inform and advocate in the community and in educational settings about the importance of developing young children's social and emotional competence.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:
1. Describe the progression of typical and atypical social and emotional development in young children, including family and cultural influences.
2. Define social competence and discuss the importance of intentionally teaching social and emotional skills to young children including friendship skills, communication skills, emotional literacy, and anger control.
3. Describe the importance of supportive relationships with family, caregivers, peers and others as a significant influence on young children's overall development.
4. Model verbal and nonverbal communication/interaction strategies that promote positive self-esteem and self-concept in children, foster self-regulation, and build positive relationships with peers, family, and other adults.
5. Facilitate children's positive social behavior and self-regulation through the use of descriptive acknowledgement and encouragement, and other positive guidance and discipline techniques.
6. Describe how social and emotional development relate to the function of children's challenging behavior and analyze young children's social and emotional development to understand and manage challenging behavior.
7. Facilitate children's play to encourage social competence, friendships, and emotional regulation.
8. Create physical environments that promote prosocial development in young children. Describe the role of the environment in the development of social and emotional skills as well as in producing appropriate behaviors and reducing challenging behaviors.
9. Apply strategies to encourage social and emotional competence in the context of naturally occurring routines and environments.
10. Design and implement curriculum that will help children to develop emotional regulation including anger management and problem solving skills.
11. Identify and examine potential challenges to implementing practices that support all young children's social and emotional development, including cultural and linguistic differences as well as developmental differences and disabilities.

Topics and Scope
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I. Developmental Stages, Theorists andTheory
   A.  Developmental characteristics and behaviors of the young child:  physical, social, emotional and cognitive
       1. Infants, 0-15/18 months
      2. Toddlers, 15/18- 36 months
      3. Children, 3-6 years      
  B.  Erikson's psychosocial ages/stages
       1.Trust vs. mistrust
       2. Autonomy vs. shame and doubt
       3. Initiative vs. guilt
   C.  Vygotsky's sociocultural theory       
   D. Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory
   E. Universal theory/Humanism
      1. Maslow's Hierarchy
      2. Evolutionary theory
II. Brain Development in the Early Childhood Years
   A. Brain basics
      1. Parts/function of the brain
      2. Process of brain growth and development in the early years
      3. Behavioral milestones related to brain development
  B.  Brain-based development of social understanding
       1. Prosocial behavior
       2. Empathy
       3. Theory of mind
III. Role of Culture      
  A. Social and emotional behavioral values and expectations
   B. Cultural patterns, goals and values
  C. Linguistic diversity
IV. Guidance and Discipline
   A. Practicing guidance and discipline
  B. Understanding and managing challenging behavior  
   C. Cultivating self-regulation and self-esteem
   D. Fostering resilience
V. Curriculum and Environments
  A. Learning environments
   B. Teacher/child interactions
   C. Social skills curriculum
   D. Emotional literacy
  E. Importance of play
VI. Issues and Obstacles
   A. Obstacles to social competence
       1. Developmental differences
       2. English language learners
       3. Early academics
   B. Use and misuse of assessments
  C. Effects of stress and trauma on young children
       1. Children at risk            
      2. Child abuse
      3. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

Assignments:
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Assignments may include but are not limited to:
1. Weekly reading assignments of approximately 20 pages per week.
2. Essays (2-4) of 500-700 words that require the student to apply concepts and content from reading and class lecture and discussion.
3. Reflective writing; personal response to material presented in class and reading;  2-4 papers, 1-2 pages each.
4. Observations of young children- infants, toddlers, or preschoolers, with a focus on psychosocial development, individually and in group settings, 2-4 observations; (use a format that requires short descriptive essay, naturalistic observation, checklist and/or running record format.)
5. Term project: case study, an in-depth written study of one child with a focus on a child who displays challenging behavior, a child who has experienced trauma, or a child who has developmental differences, 6-10 pages, includes observation(s) and written analysis.                  
6. Class presentation and written report on curriculum planning: presentation of activity and/or an environmental enhancement that encourages social/emotional development, 3-5 pages.
7. Participation in discussion and problem solving activities in class.
8. Quizzes or tests (multiple choice, fill-in, short essay).

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 50%
Essays, reflective writing, term project, observations
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
10 - 30%
Class presentation and written report on curriculum planning, observations
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
20 - 30%
Multiple choice, fill-in, essay
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Class participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Guiding Children's Social Development, by Kostelnik et al, 8th edition,  Wadsworth Publishing (2014).
Challenging Behavior in Young Children, by Barbara Kaiser and Judy Sklar Rasminsky, 8th edition, Pearson (2016).
Instructor prepared materials.

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