SRJC Course Outlines

5/20/2019 5:28:07 PMCHLD 90.4 Course Outline as of Fall 2016

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CHLD 90.4Title:  INTRO TO CURRICULUM  
Full Title:  Introduction to Curriculum
Last Reviewed:3/28/2016

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  CHILD 90.4

Catalog Description:
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This course presents an overview of knowledge and skills related to planning and implementing developmentally and culturally appropriate curriculum and environments for young children ages 0 to 8. It examines the teacher's role in promoting practices that support learning and development with an emphasis on the essential role of play.  Students will study the overview of content areas including but not limited to: language and literacy, social and emotional learning, sensory learning, art and creativity, math and science, and using the environment as a foundation for curriculum. California Preschool Learning Foundations and Framework are incorporated. This course is required for the Child Development Teacher Certificate and the Child Development Major (AA).

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of CHLD 10 and CHLD 51; OR Course Completion of CHLD 110.1, CHLD 110.2 and CHLD 51


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100 and presently working with children.

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course presents an overview of knowledge and skills related to planning and implementing developmentally and culturally appropriate curriculum and environments for young children ages 0 to 8. It examines the teacher's role in promoting practices that support learning and development with an emphasis on the essential role of play.  Students will study the overview of content areas including but not limited to: language and literacy, social and emotional learning, sensory learning, art and creativity, math and science, and using the environment as a foundation for curriculum. California Preschool Learning Foundations and Framework are incorporated. This course is required for the Child Development Teacher Certificate and the Child Development Major (AA).
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of CHLD 10 and CHLD 51; OR Course Completion of CHLD 110.1, CHLD 110.2 and CHLD 51
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100 and presently working with children.
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1987Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: ECE 130 Introduction to Curriculum SRJC Equivalent Course(s): CHLD90.4

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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Students will be able to:
1. Articulate developmentally and culturally appropriate curriculum principles and teaching strategies that positively influence young children's development and learning.
2. Design curriculum based on observation, documentation and assessment of young children to support play and learning using developmental, inclusive and anti-bias principles that support all children and families.
3. Demonstrate knowledge of the teacher's role in evaluating developmentally appropriate practices with consideration for the various impacts on children's learning and development.
4. Apply an understanding of how children learn and develop their own knowledge of key content areas to design and evaluate foundational, play-based curriculum.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course students will be able to:
1. Plan appropriate curriculum that supports a range of developmental, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds.
2. Demonstrate, through written curriculum plans, familiarity with appropriate materials, equipment, and curriculum planning principles that support optimal group and individual learning and development for all children.
3. Explain the value of play as a major element in curriculum design and implementation.
4. Create an observation- based, integrated curriculum using a web of possible activities and environmental enhancements.
5. Develop a curriculum plan including emergent curriculum concepts.
6. Identify key ways in which the environment functions as an essential component of the curriculum.
7. Utilize observation, documentation, and evaluation of children in naturalistic settings and propose appropriate curriculum possibilities for expanding children's learning in a variety of curriculum content areas.
8. Create curriculum opportunities that reflect developmentally appropriate learning objectives in foundational content areas and developmental domains.
9. Design a family involvement component that reflects knowledge of the teacher's role in creating a strong home-school connection that supports children and their families.

Topics and Scope
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I. Foundations of curriculum
      A. Theories of curriculum design
      B. Developmentally appropriate principles
      C. The role of play
II. Utilizing diverse curriculum models
      A. The environment as a foundation of curriculum
        1. Physical environment
        2. Temporal environment
        3. Interpersonal environment
III. The teacher's role in curriculum
      A. Interactions with individual children in large and small groups
      B. Concepts of group and individual behavior management
      C. Inclusion of families in children's learning
      D. Observation and documentation methods
       E. Using observation to design and assess emergent curriculum and environments
      F. Asseesment techniques for children and programs
IV. Curriculum to meet the needs of all children
      A. Developmentally appropriate
      B. Individually appropriate
      C. Culturally appropriate
V. How to plan curriculum
      A. Identifying goals and objectives that reflect children's developmental levels and cultural backgrounds
      B. Short and long term planning for a designated age group or multi-age group
      C. Planning activities and materials in key content and developmental areas
      1. Language and literacy
      2. Math and science
      3. Art and creativity
      4. Social-emotional  
      5. Physical development
       D. Utilizing specific interest areas and physical arrangements
      E. Planning daily schedules and routines to support the curriculum
      F. Using the California Preschool Learning Foundations

Assignments:
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Assignments may include:
1. Observations of children in an early childhood classroom environment (at least 2 at 2-5 pages each).
2. Self-assessment of teaching philosophy and understanding of developmentally appropriate practice (one paper of 6-10 pages).
3. Written early childhood activity plans, incorporating concepts from class and child observations (1-3 at 4-6 pages each).
4. Plan for an environmental enhancement (interest area set-up) in an early childhood classroom, including a drawing or diorama and a written paper of 2-5 pages.
5. Design a family involvement component of the curriculum to support the homeschool connection.
6.  Long-term curriculum planning project representing a weekly curriculum plan for an early childhood classroom, integrating concepts from class and child observations; 6-10 pages.
7. Assigned textbook reading of approximately 20 pages per week.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
40 - 60%
Written observations, activity plans, self-assessment
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
30 - 40%
Long-term curriculum planning project, family involvement plan
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
10 - 20%
Environmental enhancement plan
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Reflecting Children's Lives: A Handbook for Planning Child-Centered Curriculum by Carter, M. & Curtis, D.,   Minnesota: Redleaf Press,  (1996 - a classic)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice by Bredekamp, S. & Copple, C., 3rd edition,  Washington, D.C.; NAEYC,  (2010 - a classic)
California Preschool Learning Foundations and Framework, Volume 3,  California Department of Education (20 14)
Instructor prepared materials

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