SRJC Course Outlines

5/20/2019 5:39:04 PMCHLD 10 Course Outline as of Fall 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CHLD 10Title:  CHILD GROWTH/DEVELOPMENT  
Full Title:  Child Growth and Development
Last Reviewed:1/28/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  CHILD 10

Catalog Description:
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This introductory course examines the major developmental milestones in the areas of biosocial, psychosocial, and cognitive development for children, both typical and atypical, from conception through adolescence. There will be an emphasis on the interactions between maturational processes and environmental factors. While studying developmental theory and investigative research methodologies, students will observe children, evaluate individual differences, and analyze characteristics of development at various stages. Required for Child Development Permits.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This introductory course examines the major developmental milestones in the areas of biosocial, psychosocial, and cognitive development for children, both typical and atypical, from conception through adolescence. There will be an emphasis on the interactions between maturational processes and environmental factors. While studying developmental theory and investigative research methodologies, students will observe children, evaluate individual differences, and analyze characteristics of development at various stages. Required for Child Development Permits.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2005
 D7Interdisc Social or Behavioral Science  
 D9Psychology  
 ELifelong Learning and Self Development  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1990Fall 2005
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D4Gender Studies  
 D7Interdisc Social or Behavioral Science  
 D9Psychology  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1992
 4IPsychology  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: CDEV 100 Child Growth and Development SRJC Equivalent Course(s): CHLD10

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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Students will be able to:
1. Describe major developmental milestones for children from conception through adolescence
    in the areas of biosocial, psychosocial, and cognitive development.
2. Examine the multiple influences affecting children's development.
3. Compare and contrast various theoretical frameworks that relate to the study of child
    development.
4. Apply developmental theory to analyze child observations, surveys, and/or interviews.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:
1.   Describe characteristics of the biosocial, psychosocial, and cognitive development of
      children, both typical and atypical, from conception through adolescence.
2.   Explain various theories of development and methods of research relevant to understanding
      children's growth.
3.   Demonstrate objective techniques and skills for observing, describing, and evaluating
      developmental characteristics and behaviors in children.
4.   Describe the impact of genetic and environmental interaction on the developing child,
      including the significance to early brain development.
5.   Describe brain structure, function, and development from the pre-natal period through
      adolescence.
6.   Describe and explain the role of play and its relationship to development at various stages.
7.   Articulate, using current research, the importance of social-emotional development as the
      foundation for other domains of development, including factors that influence the
      development of self-esteem in children of all ages.
8.   Discuss current research findings as they apply to child development.
9.   Identify developmentally appropriate practices at different stages of childhood.
10. Examine and evaluate the role of societal influences including culture, family, gender,
      school, peers, community, and media on children's development.
11. Identify and describe influences that place children and youth at risk and may adversely
      influence development.

Topics and Scope
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I. Fundamentals of Child Development
     A. Domains of development
     B. Theories/theorists of development
          1. Psychoanalytic (Freud and Erikson)
          2. Behaviorism
          3. Cognitive (Piaget)
          4. Sociocultural (Vygotsky)
          5. Epigenetic (Bronfenbrenner)
          6. Universal Perspective:  Humanism and Evolutionary Theory (Maslow and Rogers)
    C. Controversial issues in the study of development
     D. Research methodology in child development including observational skills
     E. Holistic, integrated approach to the study of development
     F.  Cultural influences on development, including the role of the family/caregivers
    G. Special needs that impact development
II. Prenatal Development and Birth
     A. Conception
     B. Heredity, genetics and environment
     C. Birthing practices
III. Infants and Toddlers
     A. Biosocial development
    B. Cognitive development
     C. Psychosocial development
     D. Brain development
     E. Language acquisition
     F. Attachment
     G. Temperament
     H. Infant/toddler care giving practices
     I. Safe and appropriate environments that support development
IV. The Preschool Child
     A. Biosocial development
     B. Cognitive development
     C. Psychosocial development
     D. Brain development
    E. Language acquisition and development, including dual language learning
     F. Emotional regulation
     G. Prosocial and antisocial behavior including moral development
    H. Parenting patterns
     I. Early learning environments
     J. The importance of play
V. The School Age Child
     A. Biosocial development
    B. Cognitive development
     C. Psychosocial development
     D. Peer group as a developmental influence
     E. Moral development
     F. Learning environments, including the role of adults
     G. Obstacles to learning (ADD [attention deficit disorder], autism, learning disabilities)
VI. The Adolescent
     A. Biosocial development
     B. Cognitive development
     C. Psychosocial development
     D. Peer group as a developmental influence
     E. Brain development
     F. Decision making and risk taking
     G. Schools, learning, and the adolescent mind
     H. Quest for identity
     I. Parent-adolescent relationship
     J. Issues in adolescence: substance use/abuse, sexuality, teen pregnancy, eating disorders,
         criminal activity, depression and self-harm
VII. Child Maltreatment as a Developmental Influence

Assignments:
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1. Reading and discussion of assigned text and handouts (approximately 30 pages per week)
2. Observation, recording and written analysis of children's skills and behaviors, both typical
    and atypical, using appropriate observational technique and developmental terminology
    (3 - 5 observations of approximately 2-5 pages)
3. Written essays for the purpose of utilizing research skills, and expanding knowledge of course
    content; may include interviews with children and parents (approximately 2-4 essays of 3 to 5
    pages)
4. Exams on readings, terminology, presentations, and lectures (approximately 2 - 5 exams)
5. Other assignments, such as:  
     a. Group research project and/or oral presentation of findings on selected topics in
         development
    b. Term project (case study or other in-depth study using observation, research, and
         application of developmental theory and terminology)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
35 - 50%
Essays; written analysis of observations
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 15%
Written analysis of observation of children at various stages
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
30 - 50%
Exams: multiple choice, true/false, fill in, short answer, essays
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Class attendance; participation; and/or other assignments


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Developing Person Through Childhood and Adolescence. 11th ed. Berger, Kathleen. Worth Publishers. 2018
Children. 13th ed. Santrock, John. McGraw-Hill. 2015
Instructor prepared materials

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