SRJC Course Outlines

5/22/2024 9:03:22 PMASL 136 Course Outline as of Fall 2013

Inactive Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ASL 136Title:  SOCIOLINGUISTICS OF DEAF  
Full Title:  Sociolinguistics of Deaf Communities
Last Reviewed:4/2/2007

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum4.00Lecture Scheduled4.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled70.00
Minimum4.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total4.00 Contact Total70.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  140.00Total Student Learning Hours: 210.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course provides a theoretical foundation and a broad range of practical exercises and activities that explore the various dimensions of the sociolinguistics of Deaf communities. It is designed to guide aspiring and practicing interpreters toward a clear understanding of the sociolinguistic factors affecting Deaf communities and sign languages.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of ASL 132


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course provides a theoretical foundation and a broad range of practical exercises and activities that explore the various dimensions of the sociolinguistics of Deaf communities. It is designed to guide aspiring and practicing interpreters toward a clear understanding of the sociolinguistic factors affecting Deaf communities and sign languages.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of ASL 132
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.  Evaluate and describe the linguistic implications of social systems specific to Deaf people such as Deaf Education.
2.  Analyze the interpreter's linguistic responsibility and discuss and describe situations demonstrating this responsibility in terms of handling stylistic variation in both English and ASL.
3.  Describe the systematic linguistic oppression of Deaf people by hearing people or hearing attitudes in the wider context of oppression of cultural and linguistic minorities.
4. Analyze forms of discourse, including ASL discourse, through video clips, video-logs and signed resources on the Internet and written and spoken English.

Topics and Scope
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I.    Factors affecting the language and culture of Deaf communities
     A. The historical relationship of Deaf communities to the larger, hearing communities that surround them
     B. Sociolinguistic factors that impact sign language and Deaf communities
II.   Elements of a "tool box" for linguistic analysis
     A. Personal, societal, cultural and linguistic norms, behaviors and values
     B. Linguistic implications of language policies in institutions such as Deaf residential schools, public schools, and universities.
     C. Settings and situations where the exploration of cultural and linguistic differences is beneficial, e.g. workplaces, classrooms, business environments, medical situations, performance arts, conflict management situations
      D. Lexical choices and linguistic/cultural decisions that have an impact on translating or interpreting from ASL to English and
        vice versa
III.  The interpreter's role
     A. The interpreter as a linguistic and cultural mediator
     B. Interpreter as advocate
IV.   Professionalism in the field
     A. A principle-centered approach for solving personal and professional problems created by issues of cultural diversity          and linguistic variation
     B. How to live with fairness, respect, open-mindedness, and human dignity as essential principles for professional, working
        interpreters
     C. The concept and meaning of professional boundaries and the application of appropriate boundaries cross-linguistically as
        well as cross-culturally
V.    Foundation for future ASL and English discourse analyses
     A. Features of sign language and spoken language discourse
     B. How to analyze ASL discourse through video clips, video-logs, and signed resources on the Internet
     C. How to analyze written and spoken English discourse
VI.   Analyzing and resolving cultural and linguistic dilemmas
     A. Exploring and developing practical guidelines for a mindful approach to analyzing and resolving cultural and linguistic
        dilemmas
     B. Applying practical tools for developing awareness and resolving dilemmas associated with working outside an individual's own culture and language
VII.  Audism
     A. How an interpreter's experience of being able to hear has a profound impact on his/her cultural and linguistic experience
     B. How interpreters unknowingly contribute to inadvertent oppression through personal attitudes towards the language and
        culture of others

Assignments:
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1.  Reading: 15-20 pages of textbook, involving in-depth analysis of one major topic or case study plus one supplementary article (5-15 pages) per class .
2.  Development and presentation of 2-3 in-class presentations on individual topics taken from a variety of articles and the class textbook.
3.  Preparation for in-class discussions on various topics in the course.
4.  Application of self-assessment tools in class discussions through homework and written assignments to encourage self-reflection in the interpreting process.
5.  Analyze and discuss video clips and texts of signed and spoken languages by translation work both at home and in class.
6.  2-3 written exams on presented materials and readings, including a mid-term and final.
7.  Other homework activities and research projects including interpreter interviews, journal writing and internet research.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
15 - 20%
Written reports, journals, essays and short papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
20 - 25%
Case studies, presentations, self assessment tools
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
20 - 25%
Presentations, analyzing videos clips and texts
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
25 - 30%
2-3 Written exams; mid-term and final
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 15%
Class participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Sociolinguistics Of Sign Languages, Ceil Lucas. Cambridge University Press: 2001
Instructor prepared materials

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