SRJC Course Outlines

8/11/2022 4:45:30 AMART 51.4 Course Outline as of Fall 2010

Inactive Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ART 51.4Title:  GD: DIGITAL LAYOUT  
Full Title:  Graphic Design: Digital Layout
Last Reviewed:2/24/1997

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum1.00Lab Scheduled4.004 min.Lab Scheduled70.00
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total6.00 Contact Total105.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 175.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  ART 50B

Catalog Description:
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Extensive use of the computer as a design tool to develop creative page layouts for print and screen.  Several popular Mac-based software programs are explored to design with text and display type in a variety of formats.  Projects include the layout and design of ads, newsletters, booklets, and Web pages.  Topics include: the art of typography, design principles and aesthetics, and an overview of past and present design styles.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Completion of ART 18.1 (formerly ART 18A, ART 18, ART 70), or ART 51.1 or ART 51.2 or ART 51.3 (formerly Art 50A), or enrollment in the Applied Graphics Program. Basic understanding of computer operations.

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Extensive use of the computer as a design tool to develop creative page layouts for print and screen.  Several popular Mac-based software programs are explored to design with text and display type in a variety of formats. Projects include the layout and design of ads, newsletters, booklets, and Web pages. Topics include: design principles, aesthetics, typographic styles.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Completion of ART 18.1 (formerly ART 18A, ART 18, ART 70), or ART 51.1 or ART 51.2 or ART 51.3 (formerly Art 50A), or enrollment in the Applied Graphics Program. Basic understanding of computer operations.
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Create original layout designs in a digital format.
2.  Explore various design concepts and design principles for page layout.
3.  Become familiar with page layout software, and other graphics
programs, specifically intended for designers.
4.  Gain an understanding and appreciation of good design through
practice.
5.  Understand effective use of white space as a design element.
6.  Become familiar with a wide variety of type fonts and their use for
effective communication.
7.  Refine design thinking skills (analytical and intuitive) and the
ability to use one's creative imagination.
8.  Learn to use the digital scanner, laser printer, photocopier and
other design tools.
9.  Become familiar with visual resources:  bokks, magazines, and other
publications for the graphic design field.
10. Learn about the World Wide Web/Internet as a graphics and information
resource.
11. Gain an historical perspective of the important events, individuals
and art/design movements relative to typographic design.
12. Exercise the ability to make critical aesthetic judgements through
participation in class critiques.
13. Become familiar with the vocabulary and terms used by designers.
14. Define health and safety issues that could arise from the use of
artist's tools and materials.
15. Develop projects to build a design portfolio.

Topics and Scope
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The primary intent of Art 51.4 is to develop the foundation for students
wishing to pursue the study of graphic design while continuing to
refine visual literacy and performance using digital tools and media.
This includes:
1.  The ability to integrate new technology into the design process
(computers, scanner, laser printer, photocopies, etc.)
2.  Develop an understanding of visual communication concepts and problem
solving for graphic design.
3.  The ability to develop design work progressively from rough ideas
to more resolved comprehensives.
4.  The practice of design principles and visual elements central to art
and graphic design.
5.  The ability to make aesthetic decisions and judgements about design
in the development of visual compoisitions.
6.  The ability to perform specific techniques using the computer to
demonstrate these elements (produce thumbnails and finished compre-
hensives using the computer, scanner, and laser printer; precisely
assemble presentations using cutting tools, mat board and mounting
adhesives; scale artwork and produce multi-color prints using the
photocopies).
7.  The ability to intelligently use and care for the tools and materials
of Art 51.4 (disks, computers, scanners, laser printer, color printer,
color ink cartridges, and papers).
The scope and sequence of the course will be presented as follows:
1.  Through lectures concerning the concepts, elements and historical
precedents of art and design.
2.  Through lecture/demonstrations of the proper use of equipment,
software and techniques.
3.  Through student practice and demonstration of compositional,
expressive and technical concepts.
4.  Through evaluative on-on-one discussions with individual students.
5.  Through group critique discussions and presentations of in-class
and homework visual compositions.
Specific areas of student within Art 51.4 include:
1.  An overview of the computer and page layout programs.
2.  Demonstrate several ways graphics software can be used to create
original graphic designs.
3.  Demonstrate basic desig nprinciples for the oayout and design of the
printed page.
4.  Demonstrate and use the digital scanner to capture images.
5.  Explore the design process from preliminary studies (thumbnails) to
more finished designs.
6.  Review the aesthetic concerns of typographic design.
7.  Study the grid concept as a layout structure.
8.  Demonstrate designs which successfully integrate text with graphic
elements.
9.  Create designs in a variety of formats: ads, newsletters, booklets,
Web pages, etc.
10. Experiement with type as an expessive design element.
11. Study a variety of typeface designs and their unique aesthetic
qualities.
12. Review digital type designs from the large (Adobe) and small (Emigre)
type distributors.
13. Examine typographic and layout designs from varous historical periods.

Assignments:
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May include the following:
1.  Create a simple lettermark design (monogram).
2.  Explore several typographic designs for a business card.
3.  Create a set of three ads (such as a dance center) using type only.
4.  Create a series of three different ad layouts combining text and image
   image.
5.  Create page layouts which express three important historic styles:
   Classical, Industrial Revolution, and Modernism.
6.  Develop a set of "type pictures" for a class booklet.
7.  Develop a set of thumbnails which explore the grid structure.
8.  Design a newsletter using the grid concept.
9.  Design a half-sheet order form.
10. Design a home page for the World Wide Web.
11. Design an exhbition schedule for the campus Art Gallery.
12. Experiment with type for a broadside layout (tabloid format).
13. Create a small personal book combining text and images.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments and skill demonstrations are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 30%
Homework problems
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
10 - 30%
Class performances
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
40 - 80%
Portfolio of completed work, attendance, effort, growth, participation.


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Great Type and Lettering Designs, David Brier, North Light Books, 1992.
Creative Typography, Marion March, North Light Books, 1988.
Type Design, Color, Character & Use, Michael Beaumont, North Light
Books, 1987.

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