SRJC Course Outlines

4/14/2024 4:40:09 PMARCH 80A Course Outline as of Spring 2010

Inactive Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ARCH 80ATitle:  ARCH DESIGN FUND 1  
Full Title:  Architectural Design Fundamentals 1
Last Reviewed:11/20/2006

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled3.0017.5 min.Lab Scheduled52.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Introduction to fundamental concepts of architectural design including site analysis, site design, programming and adjacency diagrams, building planning and preliminary building design.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of APTECH 45 ( or APTECH 55 or IED 55)


Recommended Preparation:
Completion of ARCH 56 AND Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Introduction to fundamental concepts of architectural design including site analysis, site design, programming and adjacency diagrams, building planning and preliminary building design.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of APTECH 45 ( or APTECH 55 or IED 55)
Recommended:Completion of ARCH 56 AND Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.  Site Analysis:
 a.  Define site analysis elements such as: topography, climate, solar
     access, views, privacy, noise, vegetation, pedestrian access,
     vehicular access, storm water drainage.
 b.  Evaluate common zoning requirements such as setbacks and lot
     coverage.
 c.  Identify and perform research needed to prepare graphic site
     analysis, and prepare a graphic site analysis document.
2.  Site Design:
 a.  Analyze elements incorporated into site design for different
     building types.
 b.  Research grading requirements for different foundation types and
     site drainage, and prepare preliminary grading design for specified
     foundation types and site drainage.
 c.  Research regular and emergency vehicular access, parking, and
     pedestrian access requirements for different building uses, and
     prepare preliminary site access design solutions for specified
     building uses.
 d.  Research handicapped access requirements for different building
     uses, and prepare preliminary handicapped access design for
     specified building uses.
 e.  Research entry requirements for different building uses, and
     prepare preliminary entry access design for specified building
     uses.
 f.  Prepare a preliminary site design document, locating building and
     other site elements, for specified building use.
3.  Residential Building Programming and Adjacency Diagrams:
 a.  Examine samples of graphic programming documentation for
     residential buildings, including activities, furniture and
     equipment needs, relationships between activities, and space
     attributes.
 b.  Identify potential activity categories for residential use, and the
     information to be considered for each activity.
 c.  Determine desired relationships among and between activities for
     residential use, and explore relationships among and between
     activities through adjacency diagrams considering several
     circulation patterns.
 d.  Prepare an activity-based programming document for residential
     building.
4.  Residential Building Planning:
 a.  Evaluate samples of graphic documentation for residential building
     planning.
 b.  Research and document requirements for specified residential
     activity requirements including: entry, "public" spaces, kitchen,
     sleeping, "working," "playing," bathroom, indoor/outdoor
     relationships, and outdoor space.
 c.  Analyze common internal circulation patterns of residential design.
 d.  Prepare sketches to document potential spatial arrangements.
5.  Preliminary Residential Building Design:
 a.  Use programming and building planning information to produce
     preliminary designs.
 b.  Apply selected internal circulation pattern to preliminary design.
 c.  Compare alternative building structural systems constraints.
 d.  Apply alternative building structural systems in preliminary
     design.
 e.  Develop alternative floor plans.
 f.  Develop alternative sections through a building.
 g.  Develop alternative elevations of a building.

Topics and Scope
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1.  Introduction to the site analysis process
2.  Elements of site analysis and how to show them graphically
 a. topography
 b. climate
 c. solar access
 d. views
 e. privacy
 f. noise
 g. vegetation
 h. pedestrian access
 i. vehicular access
 j. storm water drainage
3.  Explanation of common zoning requirements
 a. setbacks
 b. lot coverage
 c. parking
4.  Researching and preparing a graphic site analysis
5.  Locating building and entry on site
6.  Locating and configuring parking and human and vehicular circulation
elements
7.  Setting grades
 a. for building floors
 b. for foundations
 c. parking and other surfaces
 d. determining cut-and-fill requirements for grades
8.  Determining site drainage requirements
9.  Introduction to the architectural programming process
 a. activity-based programming
 b. adjacency diagrams
10. Elements of activity-based programming
 a. activity
 b. users
 c. indoor and outdoor relationships
 d. equipment and furniture needs
 e. client identified characteristics
     1. orientation
     2. color
     3. light quality
     4. other
 f. area and volume needs
11. Potential activity categories for residential use and attributes to be
considered for each activity
 a. getting programming information from a client
 b. preparing a programming chart
12. Preparing adjacency diagrams
13. How to use programming information and adjacency diagrams in planning
a building
14. Internal circulation patterns
 a. types
 b. use
15. Understanding and documenting building planning information for
specific activities and spaces
 a. entry
 b. public spaces
 c. kitchen
 d. sleeping
 e. working
 f. playing
 g. bathroom
 h. indoor/outdoor relationships
 i. outdoor space
16. Preparing building planning documentation
17. Requirements for light wood frame, and light steel frame building
systems
18. Preliminary floor plan drawing requirements
19. Preliminary section drawing requirements
20. Preliminary elevation drawing requirements

Assignments:
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Representative assignments:
1.  Reading handouts and assigned textbook readings, 15-30 pages per week.
2.  Written assignments involving research, analysis and synthesis of
course material, such as 2-3 page research paper.
3.  Graphic assignments involving research, analysis and synthesis of
course material including:
 a. Perform research and prepare graphic site analysis document.
 b. Research grading requirements and preparing preliminary grading
design for specified foundation types and site drainage.
 c. Perform research and prepare preliminary site access design solutions
for specified building uses.
 d. Perform research and prepare preliminary entry access design for
specified building uses.
 e. Prepare a preliminary site design document.
 f. Prepare an activity-based programming document for a residential
building.
 g. Prepare sketches to document spatial arrangements for residential
activities.
 h. Produce preliminary designs for a residential building.
4. Midterm and final exam.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
20 - 40%
Written homework
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
20 - 40%
Graphic assignments.
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
20 - 40%
Multiple choice, True/false, Matching items, Completion
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Attendance and participation.


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Building Construction Illustrated. Ching and Adams, 3rd edition, Wiley,
2001.
The Professional Practice of Architectural Working Drawings. Wakita, Osamu
and Linde, Richard. Wiley, 3rd edition, 2002.

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