SRJC Course Outlines

5/19/2024 2:33:49 PMARCH 50B Course Outline as of Fall 2024

Reinstated Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ARCH 50BTitle:  DESIGN STUDIO 2  
Full Title:  Architectural Design Studio 2
Last Reviewed:5/14/2024

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled3.0017.5 min.Lab Scheduled52.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  ARCH 25B

Catalog Description:
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Students will create and define architectural space through the use of design elements and properties such as form, order, scale, color, and volumes. This project-based course will also explore principles used in site analysis, navigation, circulation, and wayfinding.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of ARCH 50A ( or ARCH 25A or ARCH 61A) and Course Completion or Current Enrollment in ARCH 52B ( or ARCH 26B or ARCH 62B)


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Students will create and define architectural space through the use of design elements and properties such as form, order, scale, color, and volumes. This project-based course will also explore principles used in site analysis, navigation, circulation, and wayfinding.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of ARCH 50A ( or ARCH 25A or ARCH 61A) and Course Completion or Current Enrollment in ARCH 52B ( or ARCH 26B or ARCH 62B)
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2024Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Not Certificate/Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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1. Develop architectural programming identifying primary goals and objectives for design.
2. Identify horizontal and vertical circulation requirements within a building including entrance, egress, and wayfinding.
3. Utilize design principles to create unique spatial qualities such as lighting, texture, color, volume, scale, and proportion.
4. Perform a basic site analysis identifying such things as views, drainage, sun, shadows, wind, access, circulation, flora, and fauna patterns.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
1. Create bubble or other simple diagrams exploring space adjacencies, separations, ordering principles, and circulation patterns of a simple building.
2. Utilize diagrammatic practices to illustrate plan adjacencies and circulation patterns.
3. Construct study models for architectural form and order.
4. Develop goals and criteria for an architectural program.
5. Research and understand the relationship of site components and issues that affect design decisions.
6. Create graphical design elements such as floor plans, elevations, sections, diagrams, perspectives, and vignettes to adequately depict design intent.

Topics and Scope
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I. Spatial Quality
     A. Physical qualities such as lighting, permeance, color, temperature, acoustical, and environmental
     B. Scalar qualities such as width, depth, and height
     C. Static and dynamic space implications
     D. Activities: user adaptability, participation
     E. Emotive: possibilities, anticipation, capturing human emotions, and frozen music
II. Spatial Access and Circulation
     A. Path definition
          1. Connections between elements
          2. Sequence and promenade  
          3. Intersections, nodes, terminus, and focal points
     B. Wayfinding and navigational cues
III. Design Criteria Based on Problem Statement
     A. Problem statement development based on investigation
     B. Development of design criteria and goals
IV. Program Development
     A. User profile
     B. Spatial requirements based on activity
     C. Adjacencies and separations  
     D. Public versus private spaces
V. Basic Site Analysis Principles and Considerations
    A. Site topography
         1. Slope
         2. Drainage
    B. Environmental conditions
         1. Views
         2. Wind
         3. Solar
    C. Existing conditions and other factors
         1. Flora and fauna
         2. Site access
         3. Existing site elements
VI. Process of Making Space
     A. Adjacencies and bubble diagramming
    B. Study models, combining form, playing with objects to make space, and creating space from simple objects
    C. External influences and relationship of context and site
     D. Explicit versus implicit space
VII. Models
     A. Physical models versus digital models
     B. Study models versus presentation models
VIII. Supplemental Design Presentations
     A. Perspectives
     B. Floor plans, elevations, and sections
     C. Diagrams, such as parti, circulation, and programming
 
The above Topics and Scope apply to both lecture and lab course components in an integrated format.

Assignments:
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Lecture- and Lab-related Assignments:
1. Project-based design exercise(s) (1-4)
2. Project-based design presentations (5-10)
3. Design theory investigation vignettes (3-6)
4. Midterm critical analysis and written reflection (1)
5. Final design project (1)
6. Final project jury presentation, critical analysis, and written reflection (1)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 20%
Critical analysis and reflections, design theory investigation vignettes
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
40 - 60%
Design exercise(s) and final design project
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
10 - 30%
Project presentations and critical analyses
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 15%
Critical analyses and participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction. Alexandar, Christopher and Ishikawa, Sara and Silverstein, Murray. Oxford University Press. 1977. (classic).
Instructor prepared materials

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