SRJC Course Outlines

8/11/2022 4:59:27 AMANTHRO 70D Course Outline as of Fall 2016

Inactive Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ANTHRO 70DTitle:  ARCHAEOLOGY INTERPRET  
Full Title:  Archaeological Interpretation: Conclusions and Reporting
Last Reviewed:11/23/2015

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum4.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum2.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR3.00 Contact DHR52.50
 Contact Total6.00 Contact Total105.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 210.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course will focus on the reporting and interpretation of the data recovered through the excavation and analysis of specimens recovered during field excavations, especially as these finds concern the public and descendant populations of Native Americans. Students will learn various techniques for conveying information about archaeology to the general interested public, possibly via grade schools, the SRJC Anthropology Forum, and the free public lecture series of the Archaeological Institute of America on campus.  

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of ANTHRO 70C


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course will focus on the reporting and interpretation of the data recovered through the excavation and analysis of specimens recovered during field excavations, especially as these finds concern the public and descendant populations of Native Americans. Students will learn various techniques for conveying information about archaeology to the general interested public, possibly via grade schools, the SRJC Anthropology Forum, and the free public lecture series of the Archaeological Institute of America on campus.  
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of ANTHRO 70C
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1.  Properly handle and evaluate human remains.
2.  Perform preliminary forensic analysis of human remains.
3.  Complete all forms for the proper documentation of lithic and faunal remains.
4.  Complete all forms for the proper documentation and analysis of recovered archaeological specimens.
5.  Approach and converse knowledgeably and respectfully with the public and descendant populations of Native  Americans.  

Topics and Scope
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1.  Interaction with Native American representatives and other descendant community liaisons: how we build a bridge from the past to the living present.
2.  Explanation of archaeology for the interested public.
3.  Unassisted excavation, recording, and interpretation of archaeological remains.
4.  Human remains: respectful collection and analysis.
5.  Writing ability: preparation of a plausible scenario explaining the cultural remains recovered at the  site according to the professional standards set by the Society for California Archaeology's "MATRIX" guidelines.
6.  How to report and interpret the materials recovered from a site.
7.  Preparation of a public presentation, including but not limited to, a grade school, the SRJC Anthro Forum, the Archaeological Institute of America Archaeology series on campus, or a professional archaeology conference.  

Assignments:
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1. Regular reading assignments from assigned texts and supplementary material. Typical reading assignments will be 150-300 pages per semester.
2.  In-class discussion of regular assignments.
3.  Quizzes will cover the assigned readings. Quizzes may be either multiple choice, short answer, true/false, specimen identification, short essay or any combination of the above.
4.  Midterm examinations: students will answer a combination of essay questions and quiz style questions including but not limited to, multiple choice, short answer, true/false, and or specimen identification.
5.  Final examination: students will answer a combination of essay questions and quiz style questions including but not limited to, multiple choice, short answer, true/false, and or specimen identification.
6.  Writing requirements may be satisfied by a descriptive and analytic paper addressing an issue raised in class or in the field (typical papers will be 5-10 pages). Writing requirements may also be satisfied by journal entries from the field portion of the class.
7.  On-site observation by instructor in the field where students would be expected to demonstrate the application of both field techniques and the reasoning behind them.
8.  In-class quizzes on specimen identification and lithic and faunal analysis.  

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 20%
Written homework, Lab reports, Term papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
20 - 40%
Field work and Lab reports
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
20 - 40%
Field work, Performance exams
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
10 - 20%
Quizzes and Exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Archaeologists' Toolkit. Zimmerman, Larry and Green, William, Eds. Alta Mira Press: 2003
 
Forensic Anthropology: Laboratory Manual. 2nd Edition. Byers, Steven N.  Allyn and Bacon, Publishers: 2007
 
Introduction to Forensic Anthropology. 3rd Edition. Byers, Steven N. Prentice Hall: 2007

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