SRJC Course Outlines

9/28/2020 8:45:08 PMANTHRO 32 Course Outline as of Fall 2017

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ANTHRO 32Title:  NATIVE CULTURES N.AMER  
Full Title:  Native Cultures of North America
Last Reviewed:5/8/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An ethnographic survey of the Native cultures of North America, including the Native responses to European, Euro-American and other culture contacts. Emphasis will be on indigenous cultural adaptations from the 16th century to the present, although prehistoric lifeways will also be covered.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An ethnographic survey of the Native cultures of North America, including the Native responses to European, Euro-American and other culture contacts. Emphasis will be on indigenous cultural adaptations from the 16th century to the present, although prehistoric lifeways will also be covered.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
G
Social and Behavioral Sciences
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2011
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 DSocial ScienceFall 2010Fall 2011
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 D5Geography  
 D7Interdisc Social or Behavioral Science  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981Fall 2010
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D5Geography  
 D7Interdisc Social or Behavioral Science  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 2010
 4AAnthropology and Archeology  
 4CEthnic Studies  
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981Fall 2010
 4AAnthropology and Archeology  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Analyze the basic concepts, terms, and theories used in the anthropological study of
     culture and apply them to the Native North American groups.
2.  Compare and contrast socio-political systems, kinship structure, gender relations, technology,
    subsistence patterns, arts, and ritual among various Native North American groups.
3.  Evaluate the effects of European and Euro-American colonization on traditional
     Native North American cultures.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
 
1. Identify appropriate terms and concepts used in the study of Native North American cultures.
2. Integrate data from archaeology, physical anthropology, linguistics, and Native North
     American oral history to explain the origin of Native North Americans.
3. Locate on a map and describe the Native North American culture areas, as well as the
     traditional territories of various Native groups.
4. Reconstruct the time-line of European colonization.
5. Analyze the cultural transformations that occurred within Native societies as a result of
     colonization.

Topics and Scope
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I. Overview of Anthropological Concepts and Terms
    A. Anthropological concepts of culture, culture area, ritual, and kinship
    B. Theoretical perspectives used in the study of Native American cultures
II. Origins of Native Americans and the Peopling of the Americas
    A. Biological and archaeological data and hypotheses
    B. Ethnographic and linguistic data and hypotheses
    C. Native oral histories
III. The Native North American Culture Areas and the Varying Cultural Adaptations of
      Native Peoples
    A. Peoples of the Arctic
    B. Peoples of the Subarctic
    C. Peoples of the Northwest Coast
    D. Peoples of the Plateau
    E. Peoples of the Great Basin
    F. Peoples of California
    G. Peoples of the Southwest
    H. Peoples of the Great Plains
    I. Peoples of the Northeast and Great Lakes
    J. Peoples of the Southeast
IV. Topics and Issues Relative to the Study of Traditional Native North American Cultures
    A. Ethnicity and identity
    B. Gender roles and sexual orientation
    C. Religions and world views
    D. Environmental ethics and subsistence forms
V. European Contact and Colonization
    A. Time-line
         1. Spanish contact and colonization
         2. English contact and colonization
         3. French contact and colonization
         4. Russian contact and colonization
         5. Euro-American contact and colonization
    B. Cultural change and assimilation within Native North American groups as a result
          of European and Euro-American contact and colonization
VI. Current issues, challenges, and cultural trends within contemporary Native
     North American populations, including sovereignty, indigenous epistemologies,
     law and policy, comparative global indigenous studies, women and gender studies,
     queer studies, subaltern studies, immigrant and refugee histories, and transnational
     and diasporic studies.

Assignments:
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1. Students will read approximately 10-25 pages weekly in required textbooks.
2. Students will complete 2 to 3 exams and a final.
3. One to three  written assignments  (750  to 1250 word total) and/or presentation
4. Optional assignments may include:  
     a. Map quizzes
    b. In-class participation projects

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 25%
Written assignments
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
75 - 90%
Multiple choice, True/false, Matching, Essay exams, Quizzes, Final
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Museum assignments.


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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An Introduction to Native North America. 5th ed. Sutton, Mark Q. Routlege. 2016
The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America. King, Thomas. University of Minnesota Press. 2013
The Native Americans. Spencer, Robert and Jennings, Jesse. HarperCollins. 1976 (classic)
 
Ethnohistorical Textbooks:
This Land Was Theirs: A Study of Native North Americans. 9th ed. Oswalt, Wendell.  Oxford University Press. 2009 (classic)
The People: A History of Native America. Edmunds, David and Hoxie, Frederick and Salisbury, Neal. Cengage. 2006 (classic)
North American Indians: A Comprehensive Account. 3rd ed.  Kehoe, Alice. Routledge. 2005  (Ethnohistorical Textbook) (classic)

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